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Thread: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

  1. #1
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Last Night's Dinner Etc.


  2. #2
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On 2011-04-02, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > Now that's Italian:


    I notice you hid the Ragu jar.

    > My lunch today, chow mein:


    The whole concept behind "crispy noodles" is to consume they while
    they're still crispy. Duh!

    nb

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 17:16:15 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Now that's Italian:
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg


    That is not Italian. Italians don't gloop on the sauce like that.
    And they don't hide vienna sausages underneath the sauce.

    BTW: That wasn't last night's dinner. That's was Thursday night's
    midnight snack or Friday's early breakfast.

    > My lunch today, chow mein:
    > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg


    Now that is classic TIAD if I've ever seen it. That is stewed onions,
    canned mushrooms, and soggy dry noodles slopped into a bowl with
    sawdust sprinkled on top (at 4 o'clock). Chow mein my ASS!

    -sw

  4. #4
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On 2 Apr 2011 21:21:53 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2011-04-02, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >> Now that's Italian:

    >
    >I notice you hid the Ragu jar.
    >
    >> My lunch today, chow mein:

    >
    >The whole concept behind "crispy noodles" is to consume they while
    >they're still crispy. Duh!
    >
    >nb


    Love the deer photos! but may I ask why one is titled: Mooching for
    two?
    aloha,
    Cea

  5. #5
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On 2011-04-03, pure kona <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Love the deer photos! but may I ask why one is titled: Mooching for
    > two?


    Shelly was jealous the dear wuz getting it all!

    nb

  6. #6
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On Apr 2, 4:16*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > Now that's Italian:http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpght...com/1ytzr9.jpg
    >
    > Mooching for two:http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    > Shoplifting birdfood:http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpghtt...om/28v4owg.jpg
    >
    > My lunch today, chow mein:http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg


    Love the deer, what a sweetie!

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Now that's Italian:
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg
    >
    > Mooching for two:
    > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    > Shoplifting birdfood:
    > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg
    >
    > My lunch today, chow mein:
    > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg



    Your Italian meal is making me hungry. And I'll take your
    moochers/shoplifters any time!

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On 4/2/2011 5:16 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Now that's Italian:
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg
    >
    > Mooching for two:
    > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    > Shoplifting birdfood:
    > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg
    >
    > My lunch today, chow mein:
    > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg


    All looks good.

  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.



    > On 4/2/2011 5:16 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > > Now that's Italian:
    > > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    > > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg


    Looks like fresh grated Parm'. :-)
    Please don't tell me those are vienna sausages! <g>

    > >
    > > Mooching for two:
    > > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    > > Shoplifting birdfood:
    > > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    > > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg


    They can use the calories about now after a long winter.

    > >
    > > My lunch today, chow mein:
    > > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg


    You used Arrowroot or Corn Starch to thicken?
    The sauce looks nice and silky.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On Mon, 04 Apr 2011 23:57:10 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >> On 4/2/2011 5:16 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> > Now that's Italian:
    >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    >> > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg

    >
    >Looks like fresh grated Parm'. :-)


    Actually fresh grated Locatelli Romano, from my last trip to Sam's
    Club, $9/lb.

    >Please don't tell me those are vienna sausages! <g>


    Hehe, if you think those guido big boys are puny viennas then you'd be
    a very difficult woman to please. And we all know which dwarf is
    hung up on viennas... the only time Impotent sees his widdle chicken
    weenie is in front of a mirror! LOL

    >> > Mooching for two:
    >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    >> > Shoplifting birdfood:
    >> > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg

    >
    >They can use the calories about now after a long winter.


    Especially in early spring when they're eating for two.

    >> > My lunch today, chow mein:
    >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg

    >
    >You used Arrowroot or Corn Starch to thicken?
    >The sauce looks nice and silky.


    Corn starch. I've tried arrowroot but see no advantage, it costs
    double plus it's very messy to work with, it's so fluffy that when you
    try to transfer some it ends up everywhere. The dish turned out much
    better than I expected considering I had no left over cooked meat to
    add. It contained onions, garlic, green cabbage (had no napa), bok
    choy, celery, canned 'shrooms, ginger, toasted sesame oil, black
    pepper, white pepper, Goya chicken cube, dill weed, oh, and chow mein
    noodles... they only had La Choy that day, things have good flavor but
    are hard like wood, not at all crispy, so when I have that brand I
    cook them, mostly as a flavoring. Only thing else I added was some
    soy sauce. I don't use any recipe as it's something I make to clean
    the fridge when it's time to restock with fresh produce, I don't wait
    for rot to set in... too many people buy a nice crisp bunch of celery,
    use one rib for a tuna salad and then ten days later all the rest is
    turning to sludge. Celery is one of the things that deer won't eat.
    This sort of dish is also a good way to use up all those onions from
    the five pound bag you bought on sale but only used a few and they're
    starting to sprout. Critters won't eat onions either, but they'll eat
    spuds past their prime... trick is to slice them in half, deer have
    trouble opening wide enough to handle a potato, gotta slice an old
    apple too or they just become frustrated. I'm sure lots of folks buy
    too much produce and then toss what they don't use, I hate to waste
    food... chow mein is a great way to clean out the fridge... I ate my
    fill of healthful veggies from that pot for two days. Coulda got a
    third day by stretching it with a pot of rice but I'm not much into
    plain rice. I could have made up for the lack of animal protein by
    fixing a side of egg foo young but no excuse, just didn't feel like
    cleaning more pots.

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > >> On 4/2/2011 5:16 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > >> > Now that's Italian:
    > >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    > >> > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg

    > >
    > >Looks like fresh grated Parm'. :-)

    >
    > Actually fresh grated Locatelli Romano, from my last trip to Sam's
    > Club, $9/lb.
    >
    > >Please don't tell me those are vienna sausages! <g>

    >
    > Hehe, if you think those guido big boys are puny viennas then you'd be
    > a very difficult woman to please.


    Okay, my perspective was off. <g>

    >
    > >> > Mooching for two:
    > >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    > >> > Shoplifting birdfood:
    > >> > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    > >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg

    > >
    > >They can use the calories about now after a long winter.

    >
    > Especially in early spring when they're eating for two.


    You'll take pics of the fawns this spring?

    >
    > >> > My lunch today, chow mein:
    > >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg

    > >
    > >You used Arrowroot or Corn Starch to thicken?
    > >The sauce looks nice and silky.

    >
    > Corn starch. I've tried arrowroot but see no advantage, it costs
    > double plus it's very messy to work with, it's so fluffy that when you
    > try to transfer some it ends up everywhere.


    I use it sometimes when I can get it in bulk for a good price.
    The texture is slightly different and it adds a mild peppery flavor.

    > The dish turned out much
    > better than I expected considering I had no left over cooked meat to
    > add. It contained onions, garlic, green cabbage (had no napa), bok
    > choy, celery, canned 'shrooms, ginger, toasted sesame oil, black
    > pepper, white pepper, Goya chicken cube, dill weed, oh, and chow mein
    > noodles... they only had La Choy that day, things have good flavor but
    > are hard like wood, not at all crispy, so when I have that brand I
    > cook them, mostly as a flavoring. Only thing else I added was some
    > soy sauce. I don't use any recipe as it's something I make to clean
    > the fridge when it's time to restock with fresh produce,


    I use stir fries for the same purpose. ;-) That and soups.

    > I don't wait
    > for rot to set in... too many people buy a nice crisp bunch of celery,
    > use one rib for a tuna salad and then ten days later all the rest is
    > turning to sludge.


    It CAN be frozen if you plan to cook with it.
    I sometimes freeze the leafy tops.

    > Celery is one of the things that deer won't eat.
    > This sort of dish is also a good way to use up all those onions from
    > the five pound bag you bought on sale but only used a few and they're
    > starting to sprout. Critters won't eat onions either, but they'll eat
    > spuds past their prime... trick is to slice them in half, deer have
    > trouble opening wide enough to handle a potato, gotta slice an old
    > apple too or they just become frustrated.


    Indeed.

    > I'm sure lots of folks buy
    > too much produce and then toss what they don't use, I hate to waste
    > food... chow mein is a great way to clean out the fridge... I ate my
    > fill of healthful veggies from that pot for two days. Coulda got a
    > third day by stretching it with a pot of rice but I'm not much into
    > plain rice. I could have made up for the lack of animal protein by
    > fixing a side of egg foo young but no excuse, just didn't feel like
    > cleaning more pots.


    Or scrambled an egg or two and just stirred it into what you made.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  12. #12
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 10:51:02 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> >> On 4/2/2011 5:16 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> >> > Now that's Italian:
    >> >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/24cfnt1.jpg
    >> >> > http://i51.tinypic.com/1ytzr9.jpg
    >> >
    >> >Looks like fresh grated Parm'. :-)

    >>
    >> Actually fresh grated Locatelli Romano, from my last trip to Sam's
    >> Club, $9/lb.
    >>
    >> >Please don't tell me those are vienna sausages! <g>

    >>
    >> Hehe, if you think those guido big boys are puny viennas then you'd be
    >> a very difficult woman to please.

    >
    >Okay, my perspective was off. <g>
    >
    >>
    >> >> > Mooching for two:
    >> >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/29q1jxe.jpg
    >> >> > Shoplifting birdfood:
    >> >> > http://i54.tinypic.com/qryvwj.jpg
    >> >> > http://i56.tinypic.com/28v4owg.jpg
    >> >
    >> >They can use the calories about now after a long winter.

    >>
    >> Especially in early spring when they're eating for two.

    >
    >You'll take pics of the fawns this spring?
    >
    >>
    >> >> > My lunch today, chow mein:
    >> >> > http://i52.tinypic.com/974d4h.jpg
    >> >
    >> >You used Arrowroot or Corn Starch to thicken?
    >> >The sauce looks nice and silky.

    >>
    >> Corn starch. I've tried arrowroot but see no advantage, it costs
    >> double plus it's very messy to work with, it's so fluffy that when you
    >> try to transfer some it ends up everywhere.

    >
    >I use it sometimes when I can get it in bulk for a good price.
    >The texture is slightly different and it adds a mild peppery flavor.
    >
    >> The dish turned out much
    >> better than I expected considering I had no left over cooked meat to
    >> add. It contained onions, garlic, green cabbage (had no napa), bok
    >> choy, celery, canned 'shrooms, ginger, toasted sesame oil, black
    >> pepper, white pepper, Goya chicken cube, dill weed, oh, and chow mein
    >> noodles... they only had La Choy that day, things have good flavor but
    >> are hard like wood, not at all crispy, so when I have that brand I
    >> cook them, mostly as a flavoring. Only thing else I added was some
    >> soy sauce. I don't use any recipe as it's something I make to clean
    >> the fridge when it's time to restock with fresh produce,

    >
    >I use stir fries for the same purpose. ;-) That and soups.
    >
    >> I don't wait
    >> for rot to set in... too many people buy a nice crisp bunch of celery,
    >> use one rib for a tuna salad and then ten days later all the rest is
    >> turning to sludge.

    >
    >It CAN be frozen if you plan to cook with it.
    >I sometimes freeze the leafy tops.
    >
    >> Celery is one of the things that deer won't eat.
    >> This sort of dish is also a good way to use up all those onions from
    >> the five pound bag you bought on sale but only used a few and they're
    >> starting to sprout. Critters won't eat onions either, but they'll eat
    >> spuds past their prime... trick is to slice them in half, deer have
    >> trouble opening wide enough to handle a potato, gotta slice an old
    >> apple too or they just become frustrated.

    >
    >Indeed.
    >
    >> I'm sure lots of folks buy
    >> too much produce and then toss what they don't use, I hate to waste
    >> food... chow mein is a great way to clean out the fridge... I ate my
    >> fill of healthful veggies from that pot for two days. Coulda got a
    >> third day by stretching it with a pot of rice but I'm not much into
    >> plain rice. I could have made up for the lack of animal protein by
    >> fixing a side of egg foo young but no excuse, just didn't feel like
    >> cleaning more pots.

    >
    >Or scrambled an egg or two and just stirred it into what you made.


    Woulda meant cleaning the pan, plus the dish was a bit too liquidy for
    that. I thought about making it an egg drop by stirring in a couple
    beaten eggs... for soups I often beat the eggs in the empty 'shroom
    tin to save cleaning a bowl. I'm extremely efficient in the kitchen,
    no wasted motion... this time I mixed the cornstarch slurry in the
    tin, usually then followed by the egg. When I see other peoples
    kitchens while they're cooking I become so disgusted I can't eat
    there... one gigantic mess with everything they own dirtied and strewn
    all over, including the entire kitchen itself all slopped on, the
    stove, the counters, especially the floor, and you can't even find
    their sink. I clean as I go, at any given time during my food prep my
    kitchen is as pristine as though it were never used for cooking... all
    it takes is a little planning ahead and not letting anyone "help".
    Btw, in soups/stews there is no difference whatsoever between fresh
    button and canned 'shrooms... if I really wanted an improvement I'd
    use dehys. Even the finast Chinese restaurants use canned mushrooms
    because for their cooking style they are equally appropriate but
    tinned requires less labor and there's far less spoilage, whether
    stewed in the tin or in the pot they're still stewed the same. I
    think it's the height of culinary stupidity to pay good money for
    fresh 'shrooms that belong on the grill whole but instead chop them up
    and boil them. And as far as the salt, use yer noggin, don't add salt
    to the dish till you taste it... would yoose salt mac 'n cheese.. yet
    there are kitchen kooks who salt the pasta water for a dish that's
    mostly cheese... dago cooks do that all the time and then wonder why
    their pisghetti joints fail... when the food is too salty very few
    complain, instead they vote with their feet... complaining to the
    typical thick headed guinea wouldn't do any good anyway. In the past
    three years the 'talian restaurant here in town has changed owners
    three times, it's now been empty for over a year... I happen to know
    that folks went once, just like me, and never again, too salty. When
    restaurant food is overly salty that's a good indication that the salt
    is being used as a preservative... salty tomato sauce can keep in the
    fridge for at least twice as long. Didja ever think about why cheese
    contains so much salt... MOLD! But we expect cheese to be salty, I've
    never seen anyone salt a grilled cheese, certainly not a ham n'
    cheese... but there are likely TIADers who do. Did yoose ever wonder
    why there are those huge salt shakers right next to the parm shaker on
    on every table of a pizzaria... dago mold retardant. hehe

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Last Night's Dinner Etc.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > >Or scrambled an egg or two and just stirred it into what you made.

    >
    > Woulda meant cleaning the pan, plus the dish was a bit too liquidy for
    > that. I thought about making it an egg drop by stirring in a couple
    > beaten eggs... for soups I often beat the eggs in the empty 'shroom
    > tin to save cleaning a bowl.


    That's an idea I'd not thought of! Except I do give my cans a quick
    rinse to keep my recycling bucket from smelling. <g> Even tho' it gets
    bagged, I don't want anything that attracts flies.

    > I'm extremely efficient in the kitchen,
    > no wasted motion... this time I mixed the cornstarch slurry in the
    > tin, usually then followed by the egg. When I see other peoples
    > kitchens while they're cooking I become so disgusted I can't eat
    > there... one gigantic mess with everything they own dirtied and strewn
    > all over, including the entire kitchen itself all slopped on, the
    > stove, the counters, especially the floor, and you can't even find
    > their sink. I clean as I go, at any given time during my food prep my
    > kitchen is as pristine as though it were never used for cooking...


    I cook the same way. I use cleaning as a time killer when timing the
    cooking is needed. When I am done, the only thing that needs washing is
    the serving pot, dishes and utensils. I've seen people that use every
    pot and pan they own and the kitchen is a disaster when they are
    finished! Argh! I use a knife, it gets a quick wash in hot soapy water,
    a quick dry wipe, and back into the drawer. Same for my whisk. It get
    hung right back up on it's hook to dry. I wash it immediately so nothing
    will dry on it. Just takes a few seconds! Mixing bowl? Same same.
    Takes maybe 3 seconds to swoosh it out with hot soapy water and a
    scrubby, quick rinse and into the dish drainer. Ok, the dish drainer can
    get filled up, but at least the stuff is clean. <g>

    It's all put away before I start cooking again!

    > all
    > it takes is a little planning ahead and not letting anyone "help".
    > Btw, in soups/stews there is no difference whatsoever between fresh
    > button and canned 'shrooms... if I really wanted an improvement I'd
    > use dehys. Even the finast Chinese restaurants use canned mushrooms
    > because for their cooking style they are equally appropriate but
    > tinned requires less labor and there's far less spoilage, whether
    > stewed in the tin or in the pot they're still stewed the same. I
    > think it's the height of culinary stupidity to pay good money for
    > fresh 'shrooms that belong on the grill whole but instead chop them up
    > and boil them.


    I dunno... While I agree that using dried is fine, to me, canned shrooms
    still have that "canned" taste and texture. Most other veggies work
    canned for me tho' so long as I can get the "no salt added" canned
    goods. The flavor and texture is much "fresher", imo as good as fresh
    frozen or better.

    I guess cooked long enough in a soup, that "canned" taste might cook
    out...

    > And as far as the salt, use yer noggin, don't add salt
    > to the dish till you taste it... would yoose salt mac 'n cheese.. yet
    > there are kitchen kooks who salt the pasta water for a dish that's
    > mostly cheese... when the food is too salty very few
    > complain, instead they vote with their feet... complaining to the
    > typical thick headed guinea wouldn't do any good anyway. In the past
    > three years the 'talian restaurant here in town has changed owners
    > three times, it's now been empty for over a year... I happen to know
    > that folks went once, just like me, and never again, too salty. When
    > restaurant food is overly salty that's a good indication that the salt
    > is being used as a preservative... salty tomato sauce can keep in the
    > fridge for at least twice as long. Didja ever think about why cheese
    > contains so much salt... MOLD! But we expect cheese to be salty, I've
    > never seen anyone salt a grilled cheese, certainly not a ham n'
    > cheese... but there are likely TIADers who do. Did yoose ever wonder
    > why there are those huge salt shakers right next to the parm shaker on
    > on every table of a pizzaria... mold retardant. hehe


    I've seen people put salt on Pizza!!! Makes me want to gag. I always
    taste before salting but soooo many people, first thing they do when the
    meal is served is grab the damned salt shaker. Must be habitual or
    something. No wonder so many are "salt-a-holics".

    Never realized just how much salt I tended to use until I went cold
    turkey "low sodium" and tracked it. Food tasted a bit bland for 2
    weeks. That was it.

    Then a whole new world of taste opened up. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

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