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Thread: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?

  1. #21
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    >cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    >smoothed out somehow.


    I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  2. #22
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On 2/15/2012 8:37 PM, Christine Dabney wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    >> cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    >> smoothed out somehow.

    >
    > I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    > opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >
    > Christine


    How would I find good ricotta? It all looks the same to me.

  3. #23
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:09:49 -0800, Bob Terwilliger
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > dsi1 wrote:
    >
    > > Ricotta cheese - I just don't get it. It is a most unpleasant material
    > > to put into a dish and seem more suitable as raw material for a
    > > casin-based plastic or maybe some kind of explosive. I wish they could
    > > find a better use for ricotta than as a bulking agent for lasgana. I bet
    > > they can make air hockey pucks from that stuff.

    >
    > You can use ricotta to make a pretty good cheesecake. If you purée it
    > with cooked spinach and add some nutmeg, you've got a pretty good
    > filling for ravioli or an omelet.
    >

    I like ricotta too. One of these days, I'll try making it myself - it
    looks pretty easy to do.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  4. #24
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    > >cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    > >smoothed out somehow.

    >
    > I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    > opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >

    Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.

    Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  5. #25
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    >> <ds[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it
    >> >into a cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots
    >> >need to be smoothed out somehow.

    >>
    >> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    >> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >>

    > Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    >
    > Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/
    >
    >



    Yep, easy as to make.
    Our favourite cheesemaker knocked some up in not time flat from some
    leftover whey when we were making blue cheese.

    Put some in a saucepan heated it up, added some vinegar, and hey presto!!

    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  6. #26
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    dsi1 wrote:

    >>> Ricotta cheese - I just don't get it. It is a most unpleasant material
    >>> to put into a dish and seem more suitable as raw material for a
    >>> casin-based plastic or maybe some kind of explosive. I wish they could
    >>> find a better use for ricotta than as a bulking agent for lasgana. I bet
    >>> they can make air hockey pucks from that stuff.

    >>
    >> You can use ricotta to make a pretty good cheesecake. If you purée it
    >> with cooked spinach and add some nutmeg, you've got a pretty good
    >> filling for ravioli or an omelet.
    >>

    >
    > You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    > cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    > smoothed out somehow.
    >
    > I was making some Japan-style hamburger steak the other day. The funny
    > thing about this dish is that the main spice used is nutmeg. I opted out
    > of nutmeg but added some sriracha and mustard.


    Oh, that reminds me: If you mix ground turkey with a little red miso, a
    bit of worcestershire sauce, and some ricotta, the mixture is a big
    improvement on standard turkey burgers.

    Bob

  7. #27
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    sf wrote:

    >>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    >>> cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    >>> smoothed out somehow.

    >>
    >> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    >> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >>

    > Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    >
    > Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/


    While that stuff is good, it's not ricotta. Ricotta is made by
    re-cooking whey which has been used to make some other cheese. It
    doesn't start out with milk and cream.

    Bob

  8. #28
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 03:17:52 -0800, Bob Terwilliger
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > >>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it into a
    > >>> cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots need to be
    > >>> smoothed out somehow.
    > >>
    > >> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    > >> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    > >>

    > > Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    > >
    > > Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > > http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/

    >
    > While that stuff is good, it's not ricotta. Ricotta is made by
    > re-cooking whey which has been used to make some other cheese. It
    > doesn't start out with milk and cream.
    >

    I don't know about you, but I don't run a cheese making company - so
    milk and cream it is.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  9. #29
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    sf wrote:

    >>> Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    >>> http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/

    >>
    >> While that stuff is good, it's not ricotta. Ricotta is made by
    >> re-cooking whey which has been used to make some other cheese. It
    >> doesn't start out with milk and cream.
    >>

    > I don't know about you, but I don't run a cheese making company - so
    > milk and cream it is.


    That's fine. That homemade cheese is good stuff. But it's not ricotta.
    It doesn't meet the definition of what ricotta is. Calling it ricotta is
    simply a falsehood, although it's often perpetrated by people who are
    just ignorant; in those cases it's not a CONSCIOUS falsehood.

    Bob

  10. #30
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:46:33 -0800, Bob Terwilliger
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > >>> Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > >>> http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/
    > >>
    > >> While that stuff is good, it's not ricotta. Ricotta is made by
    > >> re-cooking whey which has been used to make some other cheese. It
    > >> doesn't start out with milk and cream.
    > >>

    > > I don't know about you, but I don't run a cheese making company - so
    > > milk and cream it is.

    >
    > That's fine. That homemade cheese is good stuff. But it's not ricotta.
    > It doesn't meet the definition of what ricotta is. Calling it ricotta is
    > simply a falsehood, although it's often perpetrated by people who are
    > just ignorant; in those cases it's not a CONSCIOUS falsehood.
    >

    Tell it to Gourmet magazine.
    Fresh Ricotta
    http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2006/04/ricotta


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #31
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?


    dsi1 wrote:

    >Ricotta cheese - I just don't get it. It is a
    > most unpleasant material to put into a
    >dish and seem more suitable as raw
    > material for a casin-based plastic or
    > maybe some kind of explosive. I wish
    > they could find a better use for ricotta
    > than as a bulking agent for lasgana. I
    > bet they can make air hockey pucks
    > from that stuff.


    I think it's a staple ingredients for a good lasagna personally. It's
    not so much the taste, but for the texture it gives, as it adds
    creaminess. Much the same can be said for cream cheese...by itself, it
    doesn't have that much flavor, but it so important to a cheesecake and
    many other recipes, because of the perfect texture.

    However, my hubby does NOT care for cottage cheese OR Ricotta in
    lasagna, so I never use it, but I much prefer it, as just doesn't seem
    like 'good' lasagna without it, and I always do half and half...cottage
    cheese & ricotta.

    Judy


  12. #32
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?


    Bob wrote:

    >Fresh pasta makes a HUGE difference. I
    > like a lot of vegetables in lasagna:
    > salted-and-drained zucchini, roasted red
    > onions, sliced artichokes, sliced
    > portobello mushrooms, fennel bulb
    > (sometimes), and a tomato sauce with
    > garlic, carrots and thyme. If I want it to
    > be non-vegetarian I'll add chicken
    > sausage or I'll use pancetta in the
    > sauce.


    I've been cooking for 63 years and have never made my own pasta, and to
    my knowledge I've only tasted homemade noodles once.....in soup, and can
    honestly say I didn't think they were anything outstanding, and tasted
    every bit as good as the ones I buy, but....maybe it was the way they
    were made. I have no idea.

    I like veggies fine, but wouldn't want a vegetarian lasagna, as just
    doesn't appeal to me without meat. I've always had it with ground beef,
    but know I'd like it with Italian sausage, and may add some next time I
    make it. I don't mind spinach in lasagna, although I don't use it in
    mine, and of course, I like onion in it and a tomato product, but will
    pass on the zucchini, artichokes and carrots especially. I like
    mushrooms, but would pass on those too, in lasagna. I always use twice
    as much garlic as a recipe calls for. I suppose I shouldn't knock
    something until I try it, but just thinking about it, doesn't appeal to
    me. If you make it like that, and want to invite us over, I won't turn
    your invitation down! LOL

    Judy


  13. #33
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it
    >>> into a cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots
    >>> need to be smoothed out somehow.

    >>
    >> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    >> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >>

    > Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    >
    > Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/


    Shouldn't step 5 include reducing the heat or, more likely, turning it off?

    How much ricotta do you think this recipe makes? Yield is not given.

    MartyB



  14. #34
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Feb 16, 8:55*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:46:33 -0800, Bob Terwilliger
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > > sf wrote:

    >
    > > >>> Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > > >>>http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/

    >
    > > >> While that stuff is good, it's not ricotta. Ricotta is made by
    > > >> re-cooking whey which has been used to make some other cheese. It
    > > >> doesn't start out with milk and cream.

    >
    > > > I don't know about you, but I don't run a cheese making company - so
    > > > milk and cream it is.

    >
    > > That's fine. That homemade cheese is good stuff. But it's not ricotta.
    > > It doesn't meet the definition of what ricotta is. Calling it ricotta is
    > > simply a falsehood, although it's often perpetrated by people who are
    > > just ignorant; in those cases it's not a CONSCIOUS falsehood.

    >
    > Tell it to Gourmet magazine.
    > Fresh Ricottahttp://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2006/04/ricotta


    You can't. They went belly up, although conde nast retains the
    trademark.

    Perhaps calling a high fat homemade cheese "ricotta" led to their
    downfall. You might as well call it "nonfat yogurt," and as in the
    famous Seinfeld episode, it would be the best tasting nonfat yogurt
    you ever had.

  15. #35
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?

    Judy Haffner wrote:
    >
    > I've been cooking for 63 years and have never made my own pasta, and to
    > my knowledge I've only tasted homemade noodles once.....in soup, and can
    > honestly say I didn't think they were anything outstanding, and tasted
    > every bit as good as the ones I buy, but....maybe it was the way they
    > were made. I have no idea.


    Judy! If you only tasted them in soup, you wouldn't notice a difference.
    Try making them yourself sometime and use for spaghetti or something with a
    sauce. Homemade noodles are SO much better than the dried stuff you buy at a
    grocery store. I still settle for the store dried pasta but only when I'm
    too lazy to make my own.

    Gary

  16. #36
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?

    Polly Esther <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "news" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jhhj4m$gs7$[email protected]..
    >> On 02/15/2012 12:43 PM, Judy Haffner wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I've tasted many different lasagnas over the years, and none seem to
    >>> ever be alike. They have been fairly similar in the ingredients,
    >>> but the flavor varies quite a bit, so I think everyone adds their
    >>> own "touch" to it. What all do you use when you make lasagna?

    >>
    >>
    >> I started with the recipe on the back of the pasta box, and
    >> improvised from there.

    >
    > Whatever you put into your lasagna, the tricks are to bake it covered
    > for a while, uncovered for another little while and then to let it
    > 'set' for another while. Nearly impossible if you're feeding wolves.
    > Polly


    But the resting is important unless you don't care about it sliding apart
    and leaking goo all over the place.



  17. #37
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 11:09:05 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it
    > >>> into a cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery, clots
    > >>> need to be smoothed out somehow.
    > >>
    > >> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    > >> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    > >>

    > > Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    > >
    > > Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > > http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/

    >
    > Shouldn't step 5 include reducing the heat or, more likely, turning it off?


    No idea. If you've actually done it before, then you should know.
    >
    > How much ricotta do you think this recipe makes? Yield is not given.
    >

    You could estimate it using the gourmet recipe which does give an
    amount.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  18. #38
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Lasagna - Do You Have A Favorite Recipe?


    Paul wrote:

    >But the resting is important unless you
    > don't care about it sliding apart and
    > leaking goo all over the place.


    I always allow 10 minutes for the lasagna to sit, after coming out of
    the oven and before serving, as otherwise it would look sloppy on the
    plate and presentation is an important aspect of any good meal.

    Judy


  19. #39
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 11:09:05 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it
    >>>>> into a cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery,
    >>>>> clots need to be smoothed out somehow.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    >>>> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    >>>>
    >>> Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    >>>
    >>> Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    >>> http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/

    >>
    >> Shouldn't step 5 include reducing the heat or, more likely, turning
    >> it off?

    >
    > No idea. If you've actually done it before, then you should know.


    And if not, don't you think that would be helpful information? Kinda basic,
    whether to be heating something or not.

    >> How much ricotta do you think this recipe makes? Yield is not given.
    >>

    > You could estimate it using the gourmet recipe which does give an
    > amount.


    I'll just find a better written recipe. I have some Musgovian buttermilk in
    the fridge and I never buy gallons of milk so I need to figure out if it's
    worthwhile doing it with what I have on hand.

    MartyB



  20. #40
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ricotta

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 13:05:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 11:09:05 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 22:37:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    > >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 20:31:32 -1000, dsi1
    > >>>> <dsi1@eternal-s[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>> You could be right that processing it in a blender and making it
    > >>>>> into a cheesecake could work. As it goes, the funky, rubbery,
    > >>>>> clots need to be smoothed out somehow.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> I think you must be getting really bad ricotta, if that is your
    > >>>> opinion on it. The good stuff is nothing like that.
    > >>>>
    > >>> Agreed. Maybe he should try making it and bypass the middle man.
    > >>>
    > >>> Homemade Ricotta Cheese
    > >>> http://www.gatehousegourmet.com/2010...icotta-cheese/
    > >>
    > >> Shouldn't step 5 include reducing the heat or, more likely, turning
    > >> it off?

    > >
    > > No idea. If you've actually done it before, then you should know.

    >
    > And if not, don't you think that would be helpful information? Kinda basic,
    > whether to be heating something or not.


    I don't usually do anything new without reading more than one recipe
    and I usually end up combining them. You can do what you wish.
    >
    > >> How much ricotta do you think this recipe makes? Yield is not given.
    > >>

    > > You could estimate it using the gourmet recipe which does give an
    > > amount.

    >
    > I'll just find a better written recipe. I have some Musgovian buttermilk in
    > the fridge and I never buy gallons of milk so I need to figure out if it's
    > worthwhile doing it with what I have on hand.
    >

    Use your calculator and divide.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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