Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Lamb shoulder chops

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Lamb shoulder chops

    I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    couple of pounds for $5.49US. They look very meaty. There are some
    bones but minimal. I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so I'll
    have to freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the fridge
    until I marinate them.

    I plan to grill them along with veggies. What's a good marinade? Or
    would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? I'll do the indirect heat
    thing.

  2. #2
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On 21/06/2011 10:20 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    > couple of pounds for $5.49US. They look very meaty. There are some bones
    > but minimal. I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so I'll have to
    > freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the fridge until I
    > marinate them.
    >
    > I plan to grill them along with veggies. What's a good marinade? Or
    > would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? I'll do the indirect heat
    > thing.


    Shoulder chops are better than no lamb chops at all. They are usually
    more bone and fat than meat, but the flavour is still good. I usually
    treat them the same s I would loin chops. Rub them with garlic and then
    smear some mint sauce on them. Let them sit for a while before cooking
    and do them on direct heat.

  3. #3
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Jun 21, 9:20*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    > couple of pounds for $5.49US. *They look very meaty. *There are some
    > bones but minimal. *I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so I'll
    > have to freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the fridge
    > until I marinate them.
    >
    > I plan to grill them along with veggies. *What's a good marinade? *Or
    > would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? *I'll do the indirect heat
    > thing.


    Olive oil, lemon juice, oregano, black pepper and a tiny bit of
    garlic. Go easy on the lemon juice. I cut it with water so as not to
    acid damage the meat. You could use water to rehydrate the dried
    oregano, and add that to the marinade for the extra water. That's
    what I do, and lamb is the only meat I ever marinate.

    I like it cooked with quartered new potatoes.

    --Bryan

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 19:40:48 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Olive oil, lemon juice, oregano, black pepper and a tiny bit of
    > garlic. Go easy on the lemon juice. I cut it with water so as not to
    > acid damage the meat. You could use water to rehydrate the dried
    > oregano, and add that to the marinade for the extra water. That's
    > what I do, and lamb is the only meat I ever marinate.


    That combo (minus the water) is good although I don't go easy on
    anything, including lemon and garlic. An alternative is to substitute
    chopped fresh rosemary for the oregano. Either way is good.

    I wouldn't use indirect heat unless the fire was too hot. Indirect is
    better for roasting a thicker piece of meat like a butterflied leg of
    lamb.
    >
    > I like it cooked with quartered new potatoes.


    New potatoes love to be roasted with olive oil and rosemary too, or
    just use OO to roast and finish with some chopped parsley.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > New potatoes love to be roasted with olive oil and rosemary too, or
    > just use OO to roast and finish with some chopped parsley.


    Or roast buried in coarse salt which can be re-used endlessly. Brush off
    the salt when done. Serve alone and they are delicious or serve with soft
    goat's cheese and they are a course on their own.



  6. #6
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 07:17:17 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> New potatoes love to be roasted with olive oil and rosemary too, or
    >> just use OO to roast and finish with some chopped parsley.

    >
    >Or roast buried in coarse salt which can be re-used endlessly. Brush off
    >the salt when done. Serve alone and they are delicious or serve with soft
    >goat's cheese and they are a course on their own.
    >


    Or roasted with whole garlic cloves, salt and pepper. Wonderful.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    In article <4e014c4c$0$14687$[email protected]>,
    Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    > couple of pounds for $5.49US.


    Total, or per pound? We pay about $12/kg ($6/pound) for them.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  8. #8
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    Re: 4e014c4c$0$14687$[email protected]
    Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    > couple of pounds for $5.49US. They look very meaty. There are some
    > bones but minimal. I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so
    > I'll have to freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the
    > fridge until I marinate them.
    >
    > I plan to grill them along with veggies. What's a good marinade? Or
    > would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? I'll do the indirect
    > heat thing.


    I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor. I cook them to a
    higher temp than I would chops in order to break down the extra connective
    tissues. Otherwise any of the seasoing ideas in this thread work for me, but
    I especially favor garlic and rosemary with lamb.

    MartyB



  9. #9
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Jun 22, 6:13*am, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > Re: 4e014c4c$0$14687$882e7...@usenet-news.net
    >
    > I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor. I cook them to a
    > higher temp than I would chops in order to break down the extra connective
    > tissues. Otherwise any of the seasoing ideas in this thread work for me, but
    > I especially favor garlic and rosemary with lamb.
    >
    > MartyB


    To effectively break down the connective tissue you should cook longer
    on a lower heat. (compare beef chuck).

  10. #10
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Jun 21, 7:20*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    > couple of pounds for $5.49US. *They look very meaty. *There are some
    > bones but minimal. *I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so I'll
    > have to freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the fridge
    > until I marinate them.
    >
    > I plan to grill them along with veggies. *What's a good marinade? *Or
    > would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? *I'll do the indirect heat
    > thing.


    I like marinades based on yoghurt (for lamb). Add various spices that
    you like such as garlic/ginger or cumin/coriander/cayenne. Make sure
    you remove all the marinade before cooking so that it doesn't burn.

  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    Re: 2ba993fb-c288-4fd3-922e-fe0cdbce8118...oglegroups.com
    Helpful person <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 22, 6:13 am, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    > september.invalid> wrote:
    >> Re: 4e014c4c$0$14687$882e7...@usenet-news.net
    >>
    >> I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor. I cook
    >> them to a higher temp than I would chops in order to break down the
    >> extra connective tissues. Otherwise any of the seasoing ideas in
    >> this thread work for me, but I especially favor garlic and rosemary
    >> with lamb.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > To effectively break down the connective tissue you should cook longer
    > on a lower heat. (compare beef chuck).


    Well that's what I meant, I just wasn't specific enough. By "cook them to a
    higher temp" I meant internal temp, and definitely would not cook them over
    high heat like a rib chop or rack, which I would pull at just 140F or so.

    Lamb sirloin chops cooked slow to a higher temp are nearly as flavorful and
    tender as other cuts of lamb IMO, with just a little bit of bone and gristle
    to work around. And the bonus is that they yield some really nice pan
    drippings.

    MartyB



  12. #12
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On 6/22/2011 7:17 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Lamb sirloin chops cooked slow to a higher temp are nearly as flavorful and
    > tender as other cuts of lamb IMO, with just a little bit of bone and gristle
    > to work around. And the bonus is that they yield some really nice pan
    > drippings.


    That's why I thought I'd cook them on indirect heat to be able to cook
    them longer.

    Thanks for the ideas, everyone. Turns out I can't do a family cookout at
    my house because I have to go to my brother's for his daughter's grad
    party. I'm grilling one of the chops tonight with garlic and rosemary.
    Onions and peppers grilled for side along with some grilled potatoes.
    All that should be good for a couple of meals.

  13. #13
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On 6/22/2011 6:48 PM, Helpful person wrote:

    > I like marinades based on yoghurt (for lamb). Add various spices that
    > you like such as garlic/ginger or cumin/coriander/cayenne. Make sure
    > you remove all the marinade before cooking so that it doesn't burn.


    Neat idea! Might try that next time. Thanks!

  14. #14
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On 6/22/2011 2:04 AM, Miche wrote:
    > Total, or per pound? We pay about $12/kg ($6/pound) for them.
    >


    Per pound. About $1.50 off per pound.

  15. #15
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On 6/22/2011 12:17 AM, sf wrote:
    > New potatoes love to be roasted with olive oil and rosemary too, or
    > just use OO to roast and finish with some chopped parsley.


    I will buy new potatoes for the dinner I cook my mom. Sounds good, thanks.

  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    Marty wrote:

    > I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor. I cook them to
    > a higher temp than I would chops in order to break down the extra
    > connective tissues.


    This jibes with a Cook's Illustrated article about lamb shoulder chops; the
    test kitchen found that when the chops were cooked to medium-well, they were
    much more tender and flavorful than medium-rare.

    Bob



  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:41:01 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Marty wrote:
    >
    > > I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor. I cook them to
    > > a higher temp than I would chops in order to break down the extra
    > > connective tissues.

    >
    > This jibes with a Cook's Illustrated article about lamb shoulder chops; the
    > test kitchen found that when the chops were cooked to medium-well, they were
    > much more tender and flavorful than medium-rare.
    >

    I don't worry about "connective tissues" and just cook them. They're
    usually thin, maybe half an inch, so they are always cooked through
    and at best - barely pink and I've never thought of them as a tough
    piece of meat. <shrug> Looks like the butcher knows best and cuts
    them for maximum eating pleasure.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  18. #18
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops


    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newswcMp.59821$[email protected]..
    > On 21/06/2011 10:20 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    >> I don't know what you guys around the world pay for these, but I got a
    >> couple of pounds for $5.49US. They look very meaty. There are some bones
    >> but minimal. I've invited my mom for dinner this weekend so I'll have to
    >> freeze them until Friday unless they'll be ok in the fridge until I
    >> marinate them.
    >>
    >> I plan to grill them along with veggies. What's a good marinade? Or
    >> would you just add a rub, or nothing at all? I'll do the indirect heat
    >> thing.

    >
    > Shoulder chops are better than no lamb chops at all. They are usually more
    > bone and fat than meat, but the flavour is still good. I usually treat
    > them the same s I would loin chops. Rub them with garlic and then smear
    > some mint sauce on them. Let them sit for a while before cooking and do
    > them on direct heat.


    I agree, loin chops are the better bargain. More meat. I avoid mint sauce.
    I prefer lots of garlic, some olive oil and crushed rosemary. S&P, of
    course.

    Jill


  19. #19
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    try buttermilk as it does same as the yogurt but xomes off easier. Lee
    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e027dce$0$4769$[email protected] m...
    > On 6/22/2011 6:48 PM, Helpful person wrote:
    >
    >> I like marinades based on yoghurt (for lamb). Add various spices that
    >> you like such as garlic/ginger or cumin/coriander/cayenne. Make sure
    >> you remove all the marinade before cooking so that it doesn't burn.

    >
    > Neat idea! Might try that next time. Thanks!




  20. #20
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder chops

    Helpful person wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> I like the shoulder of lamb because it has a lot of flavor.

    >
    > To effectively break down the connective tissue you should cook longer
    > on a lower heat. (compare beef chuck).


    I like lamb shoulder for stew or braise. When I was single I used to
    get New Zealand shoulder sliced into chop-like-pieces that I reduced
    until the bone bits would fall off then added assorted root veggies to
    finish the stew. My wife doesn't like the stronger flavor of NZ lamb so
    now it's only US domestic.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32