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Thread: Lamb shoulder?

  1. #1
    Michael Horowitz Guest

    Default Lamb shoulder?

    Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    On Mar 6, 9:42*am, Michael Horowitz <mhoro...@cox.net> wrote:
    > Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    > resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    > spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    > I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    > showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    > Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    > and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike


    Maybe you had lamb shank......like an osso bucco.

  3. #3
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    Michael Horowitz wrote:
    > Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    > resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    > spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    > I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    > showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    > Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    > and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike



    From my experience in Greek restaurants, it was probably a rolled
    shoulder roast. Unlike leg of lamb, it tends to have a lot more fat on
    it. While legs usually have some fat on the outside, the shoulders tend
    to have thick veins of fat within. ImStillMags suggested that it might
    have been shanks, but you didn't mention anything about bones, and again
    from my experience, Greek restaurants are more into roasting than braising.

  4. #4
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    On Sat, 6 Mar 2010 09:54:27 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mar 6, 9:42*am, Michael Horowitz <mhoro...@cox.net> wrote:
    >> Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    >> resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    >> spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    >> I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    >> showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    >> Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    >> and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike

    >
    >Maybe you had lamb shank......like an osso bucco.



    If it was lamb shank, the video of the week is lamb shank curry, have
    a look and see if you might like.

  5. #5
    Michael Horowitz Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2010 13:29:08 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael Horowitz wrote:
    >> Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    >> resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    >> spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    >> I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    >> showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    >> Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    >> and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike

    >
    >
    > From my experience in Greek restaurants, it was probably a rolled
    >shoulder roast. Unlike leg of lamb, it tends to have a lot more fat on
    >it. While legs usually have some fat on the outside, the shoulders tend
    >to have thick veins of fat within. ImStillMags suggested that it might
    >have been shanks, but you didn't mention anything about bones, and again
    >from my experience, Greek restaurants are more into roasting than braising.



    I'd like to follow up on that. Is that a shoulder deboned and
    rolled/trussed? - Mike


  6. #6
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    The message <vp45p5[email protected]>
    from Michael Horowitz <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    > resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    > spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    > I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    > showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    > Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    > and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike


    In the UK its usual to ask the butcher to bone the lamb shoulder,
    and roll and tie it into a joint as you describe.
    I sometimes ask the butcher to stuff it before he ties it.

    Janet


  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    Michael Horowitz wrote:

    >> From my experience in Greek restaurants, it was probably a rolled
    >> shoulder roast. Unlike leg of lamb, it tends to have a lot more fat on
    >> it. While legs usually have some fat on the outside, the shoulders tend
    >> to have thick veins of fat within. ImStillMags suggested that it might
    >> have been shanks, but you didn't mention anything about bones, and again
    >>from my experience, Greek restaurants are more into roasting than braising.

    >
    >
    > I'd like to follow up on that. Is that a shoulder deboned and
    > rolled/trussed? - Mike


    I usually buy them deboned and rolled.

  8. #8
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Lamb shoulder?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Michael Horowitz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Many years ago I had what I believe was lamb shoulder at a Greek
    > resturant; I'm trying to duplicate what I had. I recall it was
    > spherical shaped, about3" in diameter.
    > I went to a local butcher and asked to see a lamb shoulder and he
    > showed me something that looked like a leg of lamb.
    > Can someone suggest where the descrepency between what I was expecting
    > and what the butcher showed me might have been? - Mike


    I don't know what you ate at the restaurant or how it was prepared, but
    the lamb shoulders I cook consist of the shoulder blade, top of the
    front leg and some ribs.

    Miche

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