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Thread: LA Times' Crack Pie

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default LA Times' Crack Pie

    This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    hot:

    http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story

    Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Momofuku's Crack Pie

    desserts

    cookie for crust
    2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (3 ounces) flour
    1/8 teaspoon baking soda; scant
    1/8 teaspoon Baking Powder; scant
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter
    1/3 cup (2 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    3 tablespoons (1 1/4 sugar
    1 egg
    1 cup rolled oats
    crust
    crumbled cookie for crust
    1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
    1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    filling
    1 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounce sugar
    3/4 cup plus 3 T light brown sugar
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon milk powder
    1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
    3/4 cup plus a scant 2 T heavy cream
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    8 egg yolks
    2 prepared crusts
    powdered sugar, garnish

    This pie calls for 2 (10-inch) pie tins. You can substitute 9-inch pie
    tins, but note that the pies will require additional baking time,
    about 5 minutes, due to the increased thickness of the filling.

    1. Heat the oven to 375°F degrees.

    2. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking
    soda and salt.

    3. In the bowl of a stand mixer using the paddle attachment, or in a
    large bowl using an electric mixer, beat the butter, brown sugar and
    sugar until light and fluffy.

    4. Whisk the egg into the butter mixture until fully incorporated.

    5. With the mixer running, beat in the flour mixture, a little at a
    time, until fully combined. Stir in the oats until incorporated.

    6. Spread the mixture onto a 9-inch-by-13-inch baking sheet and bake
    until golden brown and set, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and
    cool to the touch on a rack. Crumble the cooled cookie to use in the
    crust.

    Combine the crumbled cookie, butter, brown sugar and salt in a food
    processor and pulse until evenly combined and blended (a little of the
    mixture clumped between your fingers should hold together). Divide the
    crust between 2 (10-inch) pie tins. Press the crust into each shell to
    form a thin, even layer along the bottom and sides of the tins. Set
    the prepared crusts aside while you prepare the filling.

    1. Heat the oven to 350°F degrees.

    2. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, brown sugar, salt and
    milk powder. Whisk in the melted butter, then whisk in the heavy cream
    and vanilla.

    3. Gently whisk in the egg yolks, being careful not to add too much
    air.

    4. Divide the filling evenly between the 2 prepared pie shells.

    5. Bake the pies, one at a time, for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat
    to 325°F degrees and bake until the filling is slightly jiggly and
    golden brown (similar to a pecan pie), about 10 minutes. Remove the
    pies and cool on a rack.

    6. Refrigerate the cooled pies until well chilled. The pies are meant
    to be served cold, and the filling will be gooey. Dust with powdered
    sugar before serving.

    Notes: LA Times

    Yield: 2 pies

    Preparation Time: 1 1/2 hours plus chilling time

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    ---

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

  2. #2
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Feb 10, 11:05*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com> wrote:
    > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > hot:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/food...010feb11,0,335...
    >
    > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.
    >
    > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >
    > Momofuku's Crack Pie
    >
    > desserts
    >
    > * cookie for crust
    > 2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (3 ounces) flour
    > 1/8 teaspoon baking soda; scant
    > 1/8 teaspoon Baking Powder; scant
    > 1/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter
    > 1/3 cup (2 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    > 3 tablespoons (1 1/4 sugar
    > 1 *egg
    > 1 cup rolled oats
    > * crust
    > * crumbled cookie for crust
    > 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
    > 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
    > 1/8 teaspoon salt
    > * filling
    > 1 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounce sugar
    > 3/4 cup plus 3 T light brown sugar
    > 1/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon milk powder
    > 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
    > 3/4 cup plus a scant 2 T heavy cream
    > 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    > 8 egg yolks
    > 2 prepared crusts
    > * powdered sugar, garnish
    >
    > This pie calls for 2 (10-inch) pie tins. You can substitute 9-inch pie
    > tins, but note that the pies will require additional baking time,
    > about 5 minutes, due to the increased thickness of the filling.
    >
    > 1. Heat the oven to 375 F degrees.
    >
    > 2. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking
    > soda and salt.
    >
    > 3. In the bowl of a stand mixer using the paddle attachment, or in a
    > large bowl using an electric mixer, beat the butter, brown sugar and
    > sugar until light and fluffy.
    >
    > 4. Whisk the egg into the butter mixture until fully incorporated.
    >
    > 5. With the mixer running, beat in the flour mixture, a little at a
    > time, until fully combined. Stir in the oats until incorporated.
    >
    > 6. Spread the mixture onto a 9-inch-by-13-inch baking sheet and bake
    > until golden brown and set, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and
    > cool to the touch on a rack. Crumble the cooled cookie to use in the
    > crust.
    >
    > Combine the crumbled cookie, butter, brown sugar and salt in a food
    > processor and pulse until evenly combined and blended (a little of the
    > mixture clumped between your fingers should hold together). Divide the
    > crust between 2 (10-inch) pie tins. Press the crust into each shell to
    > form a thin, even layer along the bottom and sides of the tins. Set
    > the prepared crusts aside while you prepare the filling.
    >
    > 1. Heat the oven to 350 F degrees.
    >
    > 2. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, brown sugar, salt and
    > milk powder. Whisk in the melted butter, then whisk in the heavy cream
    > and vanilla.
    >
    > 3. Gently whisk in the egg yolks, being careful not to add too much
    > air.
    >
    > 4. Divide the filling evenly between the 2 prepared pie shells.
    >
    > 5. Bake the pies, one at a time, for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat
    > to 325 F degrees and bake until the filling is slightly jiggly and
    > golden brown (similar to a pecan pie), about 10 minutes. Remove the
    > pies and cool on a rack.
    >
    > 6. Refrigerate the cooled pies until well chilled. The pies are meant
    > to be served cold, and the filling will be gooey. Dust with powdered
    > sugar before serving.
    >
    > Notes: *LA Times
    >
    > Yield: 2 pies
    >
    > Preparation Time: *1 1/2 hours plus chilling time
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > ---
    >
    > "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    > if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    > and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    > it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    Sounds good!

    I wonder if there's a reason to bake them one at a time? I do multiple
    pecan pies at Thanksgiving.

    Kris

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 20:05:02 -0800, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    >Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    >for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    >article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    >hot:
    >
    >http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story
    >
    >Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    >enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    >but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.


    I looked at that, and wondered about it. Looks a lot sweeter than a
    Chess pie...
    Let us know what it is like...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news[email protected]:

    > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > hot:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-crackpie11-

    2010feb11,0,3355019
    > .story
    >
    > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.


    >
    > 6. Refrigerate the cooled pies until well chilled. The pies are meant
    > to be served cold, and the filling will be gooey. Dust with powdered
    > sugar before serving.
    >




    It sounds like a version of custard tart.



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  5. #5
    lil abner Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > hot:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story
    >
    > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.
    >
    > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >
    > Momofuku's Crack Pie
    >
    > desserts
    >
    > cookie for crust
    > 2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (3 ounces) flour
    > 1/8 teaspoon baking soda; scant
    > 1/8 teaspoon Baking Powder; scant
    > 1/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter
    > 1/3 cup (2 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    > 3 tablespoons (1 1/4 sugar
    > 1 egg
    > 1 cup rolled oats
    > crust
    > crumbled cookie for crust
    > 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
    > 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
    > 1/8 teaspoon salt
    > filling
    > 1 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounce sugar
    > 3/4 cup plus 3 T light brown sugar
    > 1/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon milk powder
    > 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
    > 3/4 cup plus a scant 2 T heavy cream
    > 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    > 8 egg yolks
    > 2 prepared crusts
    > powdered sugar, garnish
    >
    > This pie calls for 2 (10-inch) pie tins. You can substitute 9-inch pie
    > tins, but note that the pies will require additional baking time,
    > about 5 minutes, due to the increased thickness of the filling.
    >
    > 1. Heat the oven to 375°F degrees.
    >
    > 2. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking
    > soda and salt.
    >
    > 3. In the bowl of a stand mixer using the paddle attachment, or in a
    > large bowl using an electric mixer, beat the butter, brown sugar and
    > sugar until light and fluffy.
    >
    > 4. Whisk the egg into the butter mixture until fully incorporated.
    >
    > 5. With the mixer running, beat in the flour mixture, a little at a
    > time, until fully combined. Stir in the oats until incorporated.
    >
    > 6. Spread the mixture onto a 9-inch-by-13-inch baking sheet and bake
    > until golden brown and set, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and
    > cool to the touch on a rack. Crumble the cooled cookie to use in the
    > crust.
    >
    > Combine the crumbled cookie, butter, brown sugar and salt in a food
    > processor and pulse until evenly combined and blended (a little of the
    > mixture clumped between your fingers should hold together). Divide the
    > crust between 2 (10-inch) pie tins. Press the crust into each shell to
    > form a thin, even layer along the bottom and sides of the tins. Set
    > the prepared crusts aside while you prepare the filling.
    >
    > 1. Heat the oven to 350°F degrees.
    >
    > 2. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, brown sugar, salt and
    > milk powder. Whisk in the melted butter, then whisk in the heavy cream
    > and vanilla.
    >
    > 3. Gently whisk in the egg yolks, being careful not to add too much
    > air.
    >
    > 4. Divide the filling evenly between the 2 prepared pie shells.
    >
    > 5. Bake the pies, one at a time, for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat
    > to 325°F degrees and bake until the filling is slightly jiggly and
    > golden brown (similar to a pecan pie), about 10 minutes. Remove the
    > pies and cool on a rack.
    >
    > 6. Refrigerate the cooled pies until well chilled. The pies are meant
    > to be served cold, and the filling will be gooey. Dust with powdered
    > sugar before serving.
    >
    > Notes: LA Times
    >
    > Yield: 2 pies
    >
    > Preparation Time: 1 1/2 hours plus chilling time
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > ---
    >
    > "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    > if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    > and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    > it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

    Grand Ma use to make pies, like this, because she didn't have anything
    else. 44.00? People are nuts.

  6. #6
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 00:22:07 -0500, lil abner <@daisey.mae> wrote:

    >Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    >> Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    >> for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    >> article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    >> hot:
    >>
    >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story
    >>
    >> Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    >> enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    >> but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.
    >>
    >> @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >>
    >> Momofuku's Crack Pie
    >>
    >> desserts
    >>
    >> cookie for crust
    >> 2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (3 ounces) flour
    >> 1/8 teaspoon baking soda; scant
    >> 1/8 teaspoon Baking Powder; scant
    >> 1/4 teaspoon salt
    >> 1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter
    >> 1/3 cup (2 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    >> 3 tablespoons (1 1/4 sugar
    >> 1 egg
    >> 1 cup rolled oats
    >> crust
    >> crumbled cookie for crust
    >> 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
    >> 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
    >> 1/8 teaspoon salt
    >> filling
    >> 1 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounce sugar
    >> 3/4 cup plus 3 T light brown sugar
    >> 1/4 teaspoon salt
    >> 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon milk powder
    >> 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
    >> 3/4 cup plus a scant 2 T heavy cream
    >> 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    >> 8 egg yolks
    >> 2 prepared crusts
    >> powdered sugar, garnish
    >>
    >> This pie calls for 2 (10-inch) pie tins. You can substitute 9-inch pie
    >> tins, but note that the pies will require additional baking time,
    >> about 5 minutes, due to the increased thickness of the filling.
    >>
    >> 1. Heat the oven to 375°F degrees.
    >>
    >> 2. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking
    >> soda and salt.
    >>
    >> 3. In the bowl of a stand mixer using the paddle attachment, or in a
    >> large bowl using an electric mixer, beat the butter, brown sugar and
    >> sugar until light and fluffy.
    >>
    >> 4. Whisk the egg into the butter mixture until fully incorporated.
    >>
    >> 5. With the mixer running, beat in the flour mixture, a little at a
    >> time, until fully combined. Stir in the oats until incorporated.
    >>
    >> 6. Spread the mixture onto a 9-inch-by-13-inch baking sheet and bake
    >> until golden brown and set, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and
    >> cool to the touch on a rack. Crumble the cooled cookie to use in the
    >> crust.
    >>
    >> Combine the crumbled cookie, butter, brown sugar and salt in a food
    >> processor and pulse until evenly combined and blended (a little of the
    >> mixture clumped between your fingers should hold together). Divide the
    >> crust between 2 (10-inch) pie tins. Press the crust into each shell to
    >> form a thin, even layer along the bottom and sides of the tins. Set
    >> the prepared crusts aside while you prepare the filling.
    >>
    >> 1. Heat the oven to 350°F degrees.
    >>
    >> 2. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, brown sugar, salt and
    >> milk powder. Whisk in the melted butter, then whisk in the heavy cream
    >> and vanilla.
    >>
    >> 3. Gently whisk in the egg yolks, being careful not to add too much
    >> air.
    >>
    >> 4. Divide the filling evenly between the 2 prepared pie shells.
    >>
    >> 5. Bake the pies, one at a time, for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat
    >> to 325°F degrees and bake until the filling is slightly jiggly and
    >> golden brown (similar to a pecan pie), about 10 minutes. Remove the
    >> pies and cool on a rack.
    >>
    >> 6. Refrigerate the cooled pies until well chilled. The pies are meant
    >> to be served cold, and the filling will be gooey. Dust with powdered
    >> sugar before serving.
    >>
    >> Notes: LA Times
    >>
    >> Yield: 2 pies
    >>
    >> Preparation Time: 1 1/2 hours plus chilling time
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >>
    >> ---
    >>
    >> "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    >> if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    >> and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    >> it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

    >Grand Ma use to make pies, like this, because she didn't have anything
    >else. 44.00? People are nuts.


    My wifes mother who's 87 yrs. has been making something like this for
    the last 65 yrs. See below.


    Grandma's Gruau Pie

    Mix together in a bowl:

    1 ½ cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup of rolled oats
    1/2-cup milk or light cream or 35% cream
    1 Tbsp butter (size of walnut)
    1tsp of vanilla and
    Pinch of salt

    Pour into a prepared pie shell.
    Cover with another crust; make hole design for steam to escape.
    This freezes well at this point or bake pie on cookie sheet in 350
    oven until crust is golden and inside looks bubbly.

    This is a recipe shared with the family only at Christmas.
    It is a very rich pie and only a small piece should be served.
    Really good with Fresh cream or Ice Cream.

    Note:
    If using the 35% cream, there is no need to use the butter.
    Cookie sheet is only needed when using the foil pie plates. This helps
    the pie cook more evenly.




    Stu

    More than your average recipe website .. http://foodforu.ca

  7. #7
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>
    news[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > hot:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/food...0feb11,0,33550
    > 19.story
    >
    > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.


    <recipe snipped and saved>

    Sounds interesting. Maybe I'll dream up a "Meth Pie" and make a fortune
    selling it in the great state of Missouri. Seriously, I think it would be a
    huge hit in this neck of the woods.

    Michael

    --
    "Like all great divas, I owe everything to the kindness of gay men."
    ~Margaret Cho

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  8. #8
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > hot:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story
    >

    snip

    sounds almost like a shoo-fly pie made with a cookie crust instead of a
    regular pie crust (shoo fly is made with molasses instead of brown sugar).
    -ginny



  9. #9
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    Virginia wrote on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 10:49:23 -0500:


    > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    >>
    >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,3355019.story
    >>

    > snip


    >sounds almost like a shoo-fly pie made with a cookie crust instead of a
    >regular pie crust (shoo fly is made with molasses instead of brown
    >sugar).
    >-ginny


    From the quoted price, I thought the pie might really involve crack tho'
    I don't know if that would survive the cooking process. Am I
    disappointed!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  10. #10
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    In article <hl1a73$d6t$1@news.eternal-septembe[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Virginia wrote on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 10:49:23 -0500:
    >
    >
    > > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news[email protected]..
    > >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    > >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    > >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    > >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    > >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    > >>
    > >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...11,0,3355019.s
    > >> tory
    > >>

    > > snip

    >
    > >sounds almost like a shoo-fly pie made with a cookie crust instead of a
    > >regular pie crust (shoo fly is made with molasses instead of brown
    > >sugar).
    > >-ginny

    >
    > From the quoted price, I thought the pie might really involve crack tho'
    > I don't know if that would survive the cooking process. Am I
    > disappointed!


    I can't believe that anyone would spend that much on any pie if it
    weren't some sort of charity auction.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Ranée at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news[email protected]..
    > > >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    > > >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    > > >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    > > >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    > > >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    > > >>
    > > >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...eb11,0,3355019
    > > >> .s


    > I can't believe that anyone would spend that much on any pie if it
    > weren't some sort of charity auction.


    My daughter's good friend and ex-roommate is a baker. She worked at a
    fancy bakery last time they were roommates:

    http://www.crixacakes.com/archives/pies_and_tarts/

    Note that their second item is a large pie for US$44! Many of their
    cakes are over US$100. They do a booming business.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  12. #12
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie


    Terry Pulliam Burd gave us a fantastic recipe for this, but

    Stu offered:

    > My wifes mother who's 87 yrs. has been making something like this for
    > the last 65 yrs. See below.
    >
    > Grandma's Gruau Pie
    >
    > Mix together in a bowl:
    > 1 ½ cup brown sugar
    > 1/2 cup of rolled oats
    > 1/2-cup milk or light cream or 35% cream
    > 1 Tbsp butter (size of walnut)
    > 1tsp of vanilla and
    > Pinch of salt
    >
    > Pour into a prepared pie shell.
    > Cover with another crust; make hole design for steam to escape.
    > This freezes well at this point or bake pie on cookie sheet in 350
    > oven until crust is golden and inside looks bubbly.
    >
    > This is a recipe shared with the family only at Christmas.
    > It is a very rich pie and only a small piece should be served.
    > Really good with Fresh cream or Ice Cream.
    >
    > Note:
    > If using the 35% cream, there is no need to use the butter.
    > Cookie sheet is only needed when using the foil pie plates. This helps
    > the pie cook more evenly.


    With all due respect to Terry, I think I'll have a go at Grandma's recipe.
    But if I use 35% cream (and I will, I will) do I HAVE to leave out the
    butter? And do I REALLY have to serve only small pieces?

    Felice



  13. #13
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 13:32:21 -0500, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Terry Pulliam Burd gave us a fantastic recipe for this, but
    >
    >Stu offered:
    >
    >> My wifes mother who's 87 yrs. has been making something like this for
    >> the last 65 yrs. See below.
    >>
    >> Grandma's Gruau Pie
    >>
    >> Mix together in a bowl:
    >> 1 ½ cup brown sugar
    >> 1/2 cup of rolled oats
    >> 1/2-cup milk or light cream or 35% cream
    >> 1 Tbsp butter (size of walnut)
    >> 1tsp of vanilla and
    >> Pinch of salt
    >>
    >> Pour into a prepared pie shell.
    >> Cover with another crust; make hole design for steam to escape.
    >> This freezes well at this point or bake pie on cookie sheet in 350
    >> oven until crust is golden and inside looks bubbly.
    >>
    >> This is a recipe shared with the family only at Christmas.
    >> It is a very rich pie and only a small piece should be served.
    >> Really good with Fresh cream or Ice Cream.
    >>
    >> Note:
    >> If using the 35% cream, there is no need to use the butter.
    >> Cookie sheet is only needed when using the foil pie plates. This helps
    >> the pie cook more evenly.

    >
    >With all due respect to Terry, I think I'll have a go at Grandma's recipe.
    >But if I use 35% cream (and I will, I will) do I HAVE to leave out the
    >butter? And do I REALLY have to serve only small pieces?
    >
    >Felice
    >


    .... as per your question ...no and no.
    It is quite good with homemade ice cream or a large dollup of creme
    fraiche. It's quite sweet.

    Stu

    More than your average recipe website .. http://foodforu.ca

  14. #14
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Ranée at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > > > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news[email protected]..
    > > > >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    > > > >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    > > > >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    > > > >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    > > > >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...0feb11,0,33550
    > > > >> 19
    > > > >> .s

    >
    > > I can't believe that anyone would spend that much on any pie if it
    > > weren't some sort of charity auction.

    >
    > My daughter's good friend and ex-roommate is a baker. She worked at a
    > fancy bakery last time they were roommates:
    >
    > http://www.crixacakes.com/archives/pies_and_tarts/
    >
    > Note that their second item is a large pie for US$44! Many of their
    > cakes are over US$100. They do a booming business.


    Our wedding cake bakery (which is sadly gone, a pity since it was so
    good and reasonably priced) charged about $2 a piece for a chocolate
    marble cake with raspberry filling, whipped cream frosting, all
    decorated quite amazingly. Now, that was over 13 years ago, but I just
    can't see paying more than $3 a piece for a whole pie or cake. Maybe it
    is because I know how to bake, maybe it is because no matter how good a
    bakery is, it is rare, IME, to get something better than can be made at
    home. For a glorified chess pie, though? I don't think so.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  15. #15
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On 11 Feb 2010 15:43:42 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\""
    <don'[email protected]> wrote:

    > Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>
    > news[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    > > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > > hot:
    > >
    > > http://www.latimes.com/features/food...0feb11,0,33550
    > > 19.story
    > >
    > > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.

    >
    > <recipe snipped and saved>
    >
    > Sounds interesting. Maybe I'll dream up a "Meth Pie" and make a fortune
    > selling it in the great state of Missouri. Seriously, I think it would be a
    > huge hit in this neck of the woods.


    Not if you tack a $44 price tag on it. ;-) I think even the local
    "real" meth is cheaper than that. I'll ask my neighbor. :-D


  16. #16
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 11:25:23 -0800, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Ranée at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > > > > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > > news[email protected]..
    > > > > >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    > > > > >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    > > > > >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    > > > > >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    > > > > >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...0feb11,0,33550
    > > > > >> 19
    > > > > >> .s

    > >
    > > > I can't believe that anyone would spend that much on any pie if it
    > > > weren't some sort of charity auction.

    > >
    > > My daughter's good friend and ex-roommate is a baker. She worked at a
    > > fancy bakery last time they were roommates:
    > >
    > > http://www.crixacakes.com/archives/pies_and_tarts/
    > >
    > > Note that their second item is a large pie for US$44! Many of their
    > > cakes are over US$100. They do a booming business.

    >
    > Our wedding cake bakery (which is sadly gone, a pity since it was so
    > good and reasonably priced) charged about $2 a piece for a chocolate
    > marble cake with raspberry filling, whipped cream frosting, all
    > decorated quite amazingly. Now, that was over 13 years ago, but I just
    > can't see paying more than $3 a piece for a whole pie or cake. Maybe it
    > is because I know how to bake, maybe it is because no matter how good a
    > bakery is, it is rare, IME, to get something better than can be made at
    > home. For a glorified chess pie, though? I don't think so.


    NYC taxes were horrific (and California, too, for that matter) last
    time I was there ten years ago. I'm sure it's only gotten worse since
    then. I wonder how much they're actually clearing at that price?

  17. #17
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Feb 11, 11:47*am, Kris <m...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    > On 11 Feb 2010 15:43:42 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\""
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <don't...@donttell.huh> wrote:
    > > Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com>
    > >news[email protected]:in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > > > This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku Bakery &
    > > > Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that sells these pies
    > > > for $44 a piece and is a twist on old fashioned chess pie. From the
    > > > article, the pie is flying off the shelves and internet orders are
    > > > hot:

    >
    > > >http://www.latimes.com/features/food...0feb11,0,33550
    > > > 19.story

    >
    > > > Although, you'd have to be strung out on the street stuff to be nuts
    > > > enough to pay $44 for one of 'em. I'm going to try it this weekend,
    > > > but if anyone wants to try it and report back, be my guest.

    >
    > > <recipe snipped and saved>

    >
    > > Sounds interesting. *Maybe I'll dream up a "Meth Pie" and make a fortune
    > > selling it in the great state of Missouri. Seriously, I think it would be a
    > > huge hit in this neck of the woods.

    >
    > Not if you tack a $44 price tag on it. *;-) *I think even the local
    > "real" meth is cheaper than that. *I'll ask my neighbor. *:-D *


    I read the story about the crack pie in the elay times yesterday.
    Brings to mind an old saying..."more money than good sense." $44.00
    for a pie is way over my pay grade.

    Harriet & critter in azusa

  18. #18
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    In article <csn8n5h48iv1s95l8irp5lng[email protected]>,
    Kris <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 11:25:23 -0800, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article
    > > > <[email protected]>,
    > > > Ranée at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > > > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > > > news[email protected]..
    > > > > > >> This had just a weird enough name to interest me. Momofuku
    > > > > > >> Bakery & Milk Bar is reported to be a place in Manhattan that
    > > > > > >> sells these pies for $44 a piece and is a twist on old
    > > > > > >> fashioned chess pie. From the article, the pie is flying off the
    > > > > > >> shelves and internet orders are hot:
    > > > > > >>
    > > > > > >> http://www.latimes.com/features/food...-2010feb11,0,3
    > > > > > >> 3550
    > > > > > >> 19
    > > > > > >> .s
    > > >
    > > > > I can't believe that anyone would spend that much on any pie if it
    > > > > weren't some sort of charity auction.
    > > >
    > > > My daughter's good friend and ex-roommate is a baker. She worked at a
    > > > fancy bakery last time they were roommates:
    > > >
    > > > http://www.crixacakes.com/archives/pies_and_tarts/
    > > >
    > > > Note that their second item is a large pie for US$44! Many of their
    > > > cakes are over US$100. They do a booming business.

    > >
    > > Our wedding cake bakery (which is sadly gone, a pity since it was so
    > > good and reasonably priced) charged about $2 a piece for a chocolate
    > > marble cake with raspberry filling, whipped cream frosting, all
    > > decorated quite amazingly. Now, that was over 13 years ago, but I just
    > > can't see paying more than $3 a piece for a whole pie or cake. Maybe it
    > > is because I know how to bake, maybe it is because no matter how good a
    > > bakery is, it is rare, IME, to get something better than can be made at
    > > home. For a glorified chess pie, though? I don't think so.

    >
    > NYC taxes were horrific (and California, too, for that matter) last
    > time I was there ten years ago. I'm sure it's only gotten worse since
    > then. I wonder how much they're actually clearing at that price?


    I don't know. I was under the impression that was the cost before
    taxes. Or do you mean business taxes, etc?

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  19. #19
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:24:26 -0800, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Kris <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > NYC taxes were horrific (and California, too, for that matter) last
    > > time I was there ten years ago. I'm sure it's only gotten worse since
    > > then. I wonder how much they're actually clearing at that price?

    >
    > I don't know. I was under the impression that was the cost before
    > taxes. Or do you mean business taxes, etc?


    Yes, I was thinking of the taxes (and fees) that the businesses have
    to pay. We stopped at one little place that actually had an
    announcement on their menu sign to the effect that they knew their
    prices here high, and so were their taxes. I guess they just got
    tired of hearing about it. And their prices *were* high (and, like I
    said, this was about ten years ago). We got a small snack to stave
    off the hungries and high-tailed it out of New York. :-)

  20. #20
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: LA Times' Crack Pie

    On Feb 11, 2:25*pm, Ranée at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    > * *Our wedding cake bakery (which is sadly gone, a pity since it was so
    > good and reasonably priced) charged about $2 a piece for a chocolate
    > marble cake with raspberry filling, whipped cream frosting, all
    > decorated quite amazingly. *Now, that was over 13 years ago, but I just
    > can't see paying more than $3 a piece for a whole pie or cake. *Maybe it
    > is because I know how to bake, maybe it is because no matter how good a
    > bakery is, it is rare, IME, to get something better than can be made at
    > home. *For a glorified chess pie, though? *I don't think so.


    I have the money. I don't enjoy baking. I'll buy a pie or a cake.
    My limit is about
    $20 for a pie, though.

    Usually I limit myself to a $3 chocolate chip cookie, or as much as $6
    or $7
    for a piece of pie or cake. I do much less damage that way. The
    bakery
    I shop at uses the same ingredients I would use at home. No
    shortening. It's
    probably better than I could make at home, since they are expert
    bakers.
    (Although I prefer my husband's chocolate chip cookies, because he has
    the
    luxury of underbaking them slightly.)

    Cindy Hamilton

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