Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 100

Thread: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

  1. #1
    Stu Guest

    Default Kraft to cut salt in its foods


    PORTLAND, Ore. Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    consumers.

    The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    than 1,000 products and eliminate more than 10 million pounds of salt
    each year, the company said.

    Kraft and other food makers have cut their use of sodium in recent
    years. Among other cuts, the company said this latest move will cut
    the salt in Oscar Mayer Bologna by 17 percent, Easy Mac Cups by 20
    percent and Velveeta by 10 percent.

    "We are reducing sodium because it's good for consumers and, if done
    properly, it's good for business," Rhonda Jordan, president of health
    & wellness at Kraft Foods, said in a statement. "A growing number of
    consumers are concerned about their sodium intake, and we want to help
    them translate their intentions into actions."

    Health experts generally agree Americans eat too much salt and the
    vast majority of it comes from processed food. The excess is dangerous
    because salt contributes to high blood pressure, which can lead to
    stroke, kidney disease, heart disease or heart failure.

    Many health leaders have urged food makers to reformulate their
    products to reduce salt.

    Dietary guidelines generally limit healthy adults to about a teaspoon,
    or 2,300 milligrams of sodium, a day. People who are most sensitive to
    salt African Americans, people with high blood pressure and others
    should limit their daily intake to 1500 milligrams, according to the
    Food and Drug Administration.

    Kraft, which is based in Northfield, Ill., offers more than 100
    products with no sodium or what it calls low or reduced levels. But a
    2.05-ounce, single-serving Easy Mac Cup, for example, has 700
    milligrams of sodium about 30 percent of the recommended average
    daily intake.

    Kraft said it also is reformulating some items for international
    markets, including cheese products in the UK. But the bulk of the
    company's business is in North America.

    Among other companies aiming to cut sodium is ConAgra Foods Inc., the
    maker of Chef Boyardee and Hebrew National. ConAgra announced in
    October that it would will cut sodium 20 percent in the next five
    years.

    Campbell Soup Co. has cut the sodium in more than 100 of its products
    including V8 juices, Prego sauces, Pepperidge Farm breads and some
    of its namesake soups by 25 percent to 50 percent over the past four
    years. Campbell announced in December that it would cut the sodium in
    its SpaghettiOs canned pasta by up to 35 percent

    Associated Press March 17, 2010

  2. #2
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    Stu wrote:
    > PORTLAND, Ore. Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    > in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    > percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    > consumers.
    >
    > The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    > than 1,000 products...
    >

    snip....
    > Among other companies aiming to cut sodium is ConAgra Foods Inc., the
    > maker of Chef Boyardee and Hebrew National. ConAgra announced in
    > October that it would will cut sodium 20 percent in the next five
    > years.
    >
    > Campbell Soup Co. has cut the sodium in more than 100 of its products
    > including V8 juices, Prego sauces, Pepperidge Farm breads and some
    > of its namesake soups by 25 percent to 50 percent over the past four
    > years. Campbell announced in December that it would cut the sodium in
    > its SpaghettiOs canned pasta by up to 35 percent
    >
    > Associated Press March 17, 2010
    >


    Stu, I have been reducing my salt intake, so this is wonderful news.
    Salt can be added, but you can not remove it. I bought potato chips last
    week and they are too salty.


    Becca

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Mar 18, 12:49*pm, Becca <be...@hal-pc.org> wrote:
    > Stu wrote:
    > > PORTLAND, Ore. Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    > > in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    > > percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    > > consumers.

    >
    > > The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    > > than 1,000 products...

    >
    > snip....
    > > Among other companies aiming to cut sodium is ConAgra Foods Inc., the
    > > maker of Chef Boyardee and Hebrew National. ConAgra announced in
    > > October that it would will cut sodium 20 percent in the next five
    > > years.

    >
    > > Campbell Soup Co. has cut the sodium in more than 100 of its products
    > > including V8 juices, Prego sauces, Pepperidge Farm breads and some
    > > of its namesake soups by 25 percent to 50 percent over the past four
    > > years. Campbell announced in December that it would cut the sodium in
    > > its SpaghettiOs canned pasta by up to 35 percent

    >
    > > Associated Press *March 17, 2010

    >
    > Stu, I have been reducing my salt intake, so this is wonderful news.
    > Salt can be added, but you can not remove it. I bought potato chips last
    > week and they are too salty.
    >
    > Becca- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.

  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On 2010-03-18, Steve B <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Another thing is the serving size. I just bought a jar of large pimento
    > stuffed green olives. A serving has 7% of the RDA. Guess what one serving
    > is: one olive. It helps to read the label.


    You actually need to read the label of pimento olives to know they are
    very salty?

    nb

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods


    "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Mar 18, 12:49 pm, Becca <be...@hal-pc.org> wrote:
    > Stu wrote:
    > > PORTLAND, Ore. Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    > > in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    > > percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    > > consumers.

    >
    > > The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    > > than 1,000 products...

    >
    > snip....
    > > Among other companies aiming to cut sodium is ConAgra Foods Inc., the
    > > maker of Chef Boyardee and Hebrew National. ConAgra announced in
    > > October that it would will cut sodium 20 percent in the next five
    > > years.

    >
    > > Campbell Soup Co. has cut the sodium in more than 100 of its products
    > > including V8 juices, Prego sauces, Pepperidge Farm breads and some
    > > of its namesake soups by 25 percent to 50 percent over the past four
    > > years. Campbell announced in December that it would cut the sodium in
    > > its SpaghettiOs canned pasta by up to 35 percent

    >
    > > Associated Press March 17, 2010

    >
    > Stu, I have been reducing my salt intake, so this is wonderful news.
    > Salt can be added, but you can not remove it. I bought potato chips last
    > week and they are too salty.
    >
    > Becca- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.

    If you read the article, you'll find that many companies have already been
    lowering the salt but don't say anything. If they say something, public
    opinion says the product must taste bad. If they say nothing, sales go on
    as before.
    Janet



  6. #6
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods


    "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > PORTLAND, Ore. - Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    > in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    > percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    > consumers.
    >
    > The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    > than 1,000 products and eliminate more than 10 million pounds of salt
    > each year, the company said.


    Being a close follower of this, I applaud their decision. There is way too
    much salt in foods today, mainly because of its preservative qualities, and
    also because of its addictive nature. It is very difficult to get away from
    any prepared food with salt in it.

    Another thing is the serving size. I just bought a jar of large pimento
    stuffed green olives. A serving has 7% of the RDA. Guess what one serving
    is: one olive. It helps to read the label.

    Salt is a killer.

    Steve



  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > Every time I buy olives, I run several changes
    > of water through the can over a period of maybe
    > an hour to lower the salt content.



    Why are you buying them in cans? I never used to like olives, but that
    was back int he days when they were available only in cans and bottles.
    I always by olives from an olive bar. They are so much better than
    canned olives that they are not even the same product.

  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    > I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    > the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.


    It might become a food safety issue if they
    cut too much. Processed foods must have
    a very long shelf life, and salt helps
    with that.

  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2010-03-18, Steve B <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Another thing is the serving size. I just bought a jar of large pimento
    > > stuffed green olives. A serving has 7% of the RDA. Guess what one serving
    > > is: one olive. It helps to read the label.

    >
    > You actually need to read the label of pimento olives to know they are
    > very salty?


    Every time I buy olives, I run several changes
    of water through the can over a period of maybe
    an hour to lower the salt content.

  10. #10
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 13:49:33 -0700 (PDT) in rec.food.cooking,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote,
    >
    >I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    >the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.


    The taste of most Kraft products would be IMPROVED by less salt, so
    that's not the problem. I can't figure what salt does for them that
    makes it so difficult for them to get rid of. I guess they rely on it
    as a preservative.




  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 16:03:15 -0700, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 13:49:33 -0700 (PDT) in rec.food.cooking,
    > ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote,
    > >
    > >I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    > >the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.

    >
    > The taste of most Kraft products would be IMPROVED by less salt, so
    > that's not the problem. I can't figure what salt does for them that
    > makes it so difficult for them to get rid of. I guess they rely on it
    > as a preservative.
    >

    It's cheap and they can skimp on real flavorings if they overdo salt.

    --
    http://picasaweb.google.com/sf.usenet

  12. #12
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >> I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    >> the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.
    >>

    >
    > It might become a food safety issue if they
    > cut too much. Processed foods must have
    > a very long shelf life, and salt helps
    > with that.


    My oldest son worked on finding a preservative for large bags of Frito's
    so they would keep fresh longer. The small bags have corn, oil and salt
    as ingredients, there are no added preservatives, other than the salt.
    The large bags have the same ingredients, but they are not single-use
    servings, so people keep them longer. I will have to ask what they did,
    if anything.


    Becca

  13. #13
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Mar 18, 1:45*pm, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > PORTLAND, Ore. Kraft Foods Inc. said today that it will cut the salt
    > in its products that are sold in North America by an average of 10
    > percent over the next two years to appeal to health-conscious
    > consumers.
    >
    > The changes at Kraft, the largest U.S. food maker, will affect more
    > than 1,000 products and eliminate more than 10 million pounds of salt
    > each year, the company said.
    >
    > Kraft and other food makers have cut their use of sodium in recent
    > years. Among other cuts, the company said this latest move will cut
    > the salt in Oscar Mayer Bologna by 17 percent, Easy Mac Cups by 20
    > percent and Velveeta by 10 percent.
    >
    > "We are reducing sodium because it's good for consumers and, if done
    > properly, it's good for business," Rhonda Jordan, president of health
    > & wellness at Kraft Foods, said in a statement. "A growing number of
    > consumers are concerned about their sodium intake, and we want to help
    > them translate their intentions into actions."
    >
    > Health experts generally agree Americans eat too much salt and the
    > vast majority of it comes from processed food. The excess is dangerous
    > because salt contributes to high blood pressure, which can lead to
    > stroke, kidney disease, heart disease or heart failure.
    >
    > Many health leaders have urged food makers to reformulate their
    > products to reduce salt.
    >
    > Dietary guidelines generally limit healthy adults to about a teaspoon,
    > or 2,300 milligrams of sodium, a day. People who are most sensitive to
    > salt African Americans, people with high blood pressure and others
    > should limit their daily intake to 1500 milligrams, according to the
    > Food and Drug Administration.
    >
    > Kraft, which is based in Northfield, Ill., offers more than 100
    > products with no sodium or what it calls low or reduced levels. But a
    > 2.05-ounce, single-serving Easy Mac Cup, for example, has 700
    > milligrams of sodium about 30 percent of the recommended average
    > daily intake.
    >
    > Kraft said it also is reformulating some items for international
    > markets, including cheese products in the UK. But the bulk of the
    > company's business is in North America.
    >
    > Among other companies aiming to cut sodium is ConAgra Foods Inc., the
    > maker of Chef Boyardee and Hebrew National. ConAgra announced in
    > October that it would will cut sodium 20 percent in the next five
    > years.
    >
    > Campbell Soup Co. has cut the sodium in more than 100 of its products
    > including V8 juices, Prego sauces, Pepperidge Farm breads and some
    > of its namesake soups by 25 percent to 50 percent over the past four
    > years. Campbell announced in December that it would cut the sodium in
    > its SpaghettiOs canned pasta by up to 35 percent
    >
    > Associated Press *March 17, 2010


    Personally I''d rather have the salt. They always say you can't tell
    the difference but I always can.

  14. #14
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > >
    > > Every time I buy olives, I run several changes
    > > of water through the can over a period of maybe
    > > an hour to lower the salt content.

    >
    > Why are you buying them in cans? I never used to like olives, but that
    > was back int he days when they were available only in cans and bottles.
    > I always by olives from an olive bar. They are so much better than
    > canned olives that they are not even the same product.


    It's true that the French salt-cured olives I can
    buy at Whole Foods are a completely different thing.
    And you can learn to recognize the really good ones,
    which are more delicate, and only pick out those ones
    when buying from their olive bar. They are very
    salty, but I'd never soak them.

    But the canned are a very convenient component of
    salads and wraps. I don't go to Whole Foods every
    day, and when I do, I usually don't buy olives.

    You didn't like olives until you had them from an
    olive bar. I've always liked olives, even from cans.

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    >
    > It's true that the French salt-cured olives I can
    > buy at Whole Foods are a completely different thing.
    > And you can learn to recognize the really good ones,
    > which are more delicate, and only pick out those ones
    > when buying from their olive bar. They are very
    > salty, but I'd never soak them.
    >
    > But the canned are a very convenient component of
    > salads and wraps. I don't go to Whole Foods every
    > day, and when I do, I usually don't buy olives.
    >
    > You didn't like olives until you had them from an
    > olive bar. I've always liked olives, even from cans.



    Not exactly. For a long time olives never appealed to me. I probably
    never tried one. One day in my mid 20s <?> I had the munchies and tried
    one and decided they weren't so bad. Then I discovered that the olives
    sold at a local deli were incredible. I got hooked on them and have been
    buying and eating them ever since, but I buy them only at olive bars or
    in delis. I never buy canned or bottled olives. They are IMO a very poor
    substitute.

  16. #16
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 19:24:11 -0500, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> ImStillMags wrote:
    >>
    >>> I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    >>> the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.
    >>>

    >>
    >> It might become a food safety issue if they
    >> cut too much. Processed foods must have
    >> a very long shelf life, and salt helps
    >> with that.

    >
    >My oldest son worked on finding a preservative for large bags of Frito's
    >so they would keep fresh longer. The small bags have corn, oil and salt
    >as ingredients, there are no added preservatives, other than the salt.
    >The large bags have the same ingredients, but they are not single-use
    >servings, so people keep them longer. I will have to ask what they did,
    >if anything.


    People who buy chips in larger bags eat larger servings... bet ya
    can't eat just one. All prepared foods contain added salt... if you
    buy canned/jarred soups/sauces they will probably contain more salt
    than if you made your own. But even when you make your own you will
    add substantial salt or why bother... soup without salt is pretty
    unsatisfying, most folks won't eat it... it's like does anyone
    actually eat fat free cheese? blech. It's easy to cut back on salt,
    eat more fresh fruit and raw vegetables. I think this salt issue is a
    lot of crap, there are always alarmists seeking issues, remember the
    butter police, now it's the salt police. Unless your doctor informs
    you that you have a condition where cutting back on salt is indicated
    you will harm yourself more from worry about salt than if you simply
    consume salt sensibly... eating pizza, chips, and tube steak
    practically every day is not wise on many levels, not just salt.
    Remember, the healthy human body is remarkable at regulating itself,
    excess salt is eliminated quickly, provided one engages in moderate
    exercise and is sufficiently hydrated with plain water. If you sit at
    a pc 8 hours a day while sucking down soda and think a 1 pound bag of
    potato chips is your 5-a-Day of fresh produce then sooner rather than
    later you will be in trouble. You really cannot overdose on fresh
    produce, and there are many ways to dress a salad without briney
    dressings.

  17. #17
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 17:04:08 -0700 in rec.food.cooking, sf
    <[email protected]> wrote,
    >On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 16:03:15 -0700, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 13:49:33 -0700 (PDT) in rec.food.cooking,
    >> ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote,
    >> >
    >> >I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    >> >the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.

    >>
    >> The taste of most Kraft products would be IMPROVED by less salt, so
    >> that's not the problem. I can't figure what salt does for them that
    >> makes it so difficult for them to get rid of. I guess they rely on it
    >> as a preservative.
    >>

    >It's cheap and they can skimp on real flavorings if they overdo salt.


    {Smacking head} Yeah, I guess that one should have pretty obvious.



  18. #18
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Stu <[email protected]> posted on Thu, 18 Mar
    2010 12:45:09 -0500 the following:

    > "We are reducing sodium because it's good for consumers and, if done
    > properly, it's good for business," Rhonda Jordan, president of health
    > & wellness at Kraft Foods, said in a statement.


    Some people think it's good for you to drink your own urine, too. Is
    Kraft going to pee in our food, too? I'd much rather see them leave in
    the salt and take out the hydrogenated oils, the MSG, and all the goofy
    chemical additives. I've bought plenty of foods that don't contain
    strange additives and they tasted better than the mainstream brands.

    > Kraft, which is based in Northfield, Ill., offers more than 100
    > products with no sodium or what it calls low or reduced levels. But a
    > 2.05-ounce, single-serving Easy Mac Cup, for example, has 700
    > milligrams of sodium +IBQ- about 30 percent of the recommended average
    > daily intake.


    I wonder if they're going to start including potassium chloride instead. I
    think that'd be worse than just using plain old salt.

    Damaeus

  19. #19
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    In news:rec.food.cooking, "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> posted on
    Thu, 18 Mar 2010 15:22:30 -0600 the following:

    > I wonder how much a company can reduce the sodium before the taste of
    > the item is affected? I'lll bet it's more than we think.
    >
    > If you read the article, you'll find that many companies have already been
    > lowering the salt but don't say anything. If they say something, public
    > opinion says the product must taste bad. If they say nothing, sales go on
    > as before.


    I don't mind them removing salt. I just don't want them to replace salt
    with something strange that tastes similar to salt, just to preserve its
    flavor. I'd rather get something with no salt at all in it, and no
    potassium chloride, either, then add my own when I cook it or heat it up.

    Damaeus

  20. #20
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: Kraft to cut salt in its foods

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Becca <[email protected]> posted on Thu, 18 Mar
    2010 19:24:11 -0500 the following:

    > My oldest son worked on finding a preservative for large bags of Frito's
    > so they would keep fresh longer. The small bags have corn, oil and salt
    > as ingredients, there are no added preservatives, other than the salt.
    > The large bags have the same ingredients, but they are not single-use
    > servings, so people keep them longer. I will have to ask what they did,
    > if anything.


    My favorite tortilla chips, El Milagro Mexican Kitchen Style chips, have
    no salt on them, and they are delicious with or without dip, far better
    than any other corn chip, salted or unsalted. They do seem to go stale a
    little faster than some other brands of chips, but sometimes I think
    that's because of the rather thin plastic bag they come in. But it's
    really no problem. The staleness is only because the chips have absorbed
    some atmospheric moisture. When I put the chips in the oven for a few
    minutes, all the moisture is removed, and they're crispier than they were
    when I first bought them.

    Damaeus

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32