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Thread: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    nobody would eat U.S. beef.


    Quoting from:
    http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php

    Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    U.S. beef imports.

    The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.

  2. #2
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    So then can eat rice, bugs and dirt. Big deal.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se


  3. #3
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    So then can eat rice, bugs and dirt. Big deal.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se


  4. #4
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    On May 31, 3:02*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. *If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. *If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.


    There's a better explanation for the USDA's stubbornness. If one
    started doing it, they'd all have to eventually follow suit, and the
    cattle producers' lobby will have none of that. Very little BSE.
    Lots of campaign contributions.

    I disagree with USDA policy because it is an unjustfied intrusion into
    the marketplace.

    --Bryan

  5. #5
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    On May 31, 3:02*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. *If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. *If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.


    There's a better explanation for the USDA's stubbornness. If one
    started doing it, they'd all have to eventually follow suit, and the
    cattle producers' lobby will have none of that. Very little BSE.
    Lots of campaign contributions.

    I disagree with USDA policy because it is an unjustfied intrusion into
    the marketplace.

    --Bryan

  6. #6
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef


    Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    More for me... Urp!

  7. #7
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef


    Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    More for me... Urp!

  8. #8
    none Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked to mad cow
    disease. None were in America.
    All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when taken to
    slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.
    American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle, which was the
    primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.

    If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly and
    passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true, that does not
    make it true.

    That includes the media.

  9. #9
    none Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >
    >
    > Quoting from:
    > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >
    > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > U.S. beef imports.
    >
    > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked to mad cow
    disease. None were in America.
    All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when taken to
    slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.
    American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle, which was the
    primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.

    If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly and
    passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true, that does not
    make it true.

    That includes the media.

  10. #10
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    none wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    > >
    > >
    > > Quoting from:
    > > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    > >
    > > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > > U.S. beef imports.
    > >
    > > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.

    >
    > By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    > In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked
    > to mad cow disease. None were in America.


    Not true. According to the CDC, there's been at least 200
    confirmed cases, 3 in the U.S.

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/vcjd/factsheet_nvcjd.htm

    The actual number may be much higher, due to political
    interference preventing more tests from being done.

    > All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when
    > taken to slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.


    Not true. There was an attempt to do that during the
    "enhanced surveillance" program which began in 2004
    and ended in 2006, but even during that period not
    all downer cattle were tested.

    http://www.cidrapsummit.net/cidrap/c...ly1404bse.html

    In 2006, USDA transitioned to the "ongoing
    surveillance" program, which has sharply curtailed
    the number of tests (about 759,000 animals tested
    during 2004-2006, to about 40,000 per year since
    then).

    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicatio...ongoing_vs.pdf

    USDA admits that even the enhanced surveillance program
    was not a food safety program. It was a research program
    to evaluate the prevalence of BSE, not a screening program
    to prevent BSE-infected cattle from being slaughtered.

    > American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle,
    > which was the primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.


    But there are loopholes. Cellulosic sausage
    casings which contain beef residues may be fed to
    cattle. (This is waste from making hot dogs --
    the hot dogs are cooked in the casings, which are
    then removed and disposed by feeding to cattle.)

    Also, "chicken litter" -- the spilled chicken feed
    and other material shoveled out of chicken feeding
    operations -- may be fed to cattle. Downer cattle
    may be processed into non-ruminant protein supplements,
    which may be fed to chickens. So, it is not true
    to say that downer cattle are not being fed to other
    cattle.

    http://berkeley.edu/news/media/relea...1/26_moo.shtml

    > If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly
    > and passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true,
    > that does not make it true.
    >
    > That includes the media.


    All of your "facts" are wrong. I've backed up my
    corrections with links to primary sources. I know
    much more about this issue than you do, and much
    of what you "know" ain't true.

    The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.

  11. #11
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    none wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > > I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    > > and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    > > the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    > > testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    > > were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    > > all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    > > Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    > > nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    > >
    > >
    > > Quoting from:
    > > http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    > >
    > > Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    > > young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    > > on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    > > U.S. beef imports.
    > >
    > > The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    > > faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    > > took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    > > reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    > > failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    > > media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.

    >
    > By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    > In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked
    > to mad cow disease. None were in America.


    Not true. According to the CDC, there's been at least 200
    confirmed cases, 3 in the U.S.

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/vcjd/factsheet_nvcjd.htm

    The actual number may be much higher, due to political
    interference preventing more tests from being done.

    > All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when
    > taken to slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.


    Not true. There was an attempt to do that during the
    "enhanced surveillance" program which began in 2004
    and ended in 2006, but even during that period not
    all downer cattle were tested.

    http://www.cidrapsummit.net/cidrap/c...ly1404bse.html

    In 2006, USDA transitioned to the "ongoing
    surveillance" program, which has sharply curtailed
    the number of tests (about 759,000 animals tested
    during 2004-2006, to about 40,000 per year since
    then).

    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicatio...ongoing_vs.pdf

    USDA admits that even the enhanced surveillance program
    was not a food safety program. It was a research program
    to evaluate the prevalence of BSE, not a screening program
    to prevent BSE-infected cattle from being slaughtered.

    > American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle,
    > which was the primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.


    But there are loopholes. Cellulosic sausage
    casings which contain beef residues may be fed to
    cattle. (This is waste from making hot dogs --
    the hot dogs are cooked in the casings, which are
    then removed and disposed by feeding to cattle.)

    Also, "chicken litter" -- the spilled chicken feed
    and other material shoveled out of chicken feeding
    operations -- may be fed to cattle. Downer cattle
    may be processed into non-ruminant protein supplements,
    which may be fed to chickens. So, it is not true
    to say that downer cattle are not being fed to other
    cattle.

    http://berkeley.edu/news/media/relea...1/26_moo.shtml

    > If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly
    > and passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true,
    > that does not make it true.
    >
    > That includes the media.


    All of your "facts" are wrong. I've backed up my
    corrections with links to primary sources. I know
    much more about this issue than you do, and much
    of what you "know" ain't true.

    The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.

  12. #12
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef


    > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.



    Americans foolishly believe the USDA still exists in a form that is meant to
    protect public health. They no longer monitor meat packing plants at all
    unless invited. The packers have to pay the USDA to inspect their operation
    so as to get a "USDA Inspected" sticker. It is all advertising. The most
    egregious violations ever in the meat packing industry happened not 12 miles
    from where I live. Over 150 million pounds of "downer" meat - all of it
    untested - ALL - was recalled. The problem was it had all been eaten by
    that time - sold to the school system for children's lunches. Does that
    give anyone an idea of just what we are dealing with here?

    The USDA now is run by corporate special interests. It exists only to
    protect the meat industry from the public. A complete reversal of its
    original charter.

    Paul



  13. #13
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef


    > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.



    Americans foolishly believe the USDA still exists in a form that is meant to
    protect public health. They no longer monitor meat packing plants at all
    unless invited. The packers have to pay the USDA to inspect their operation
    so as to get a "USDA Inspected" sticker. It is all advertising. The most
    egregious violations ever in the meat packing industry happened not 12 miles
    from where I live. Over 150 million pounds of "downer" meat - all of it
    untested - ALL - was recalled. The problem was it had all been eaten by
    that time - sold to the school system for children's lunches. Does that
    give anyone an idea of just what we are dealing with here?

    The USDA now is run by corporate special interests. It exists only to
    protect the meat industry from the public. A complete reversal of its
    original charter.

    Paul



  14. #14
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    On May 31, 5:50*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.

    >
    > Americans foolishly believe the USDA still exists in a form that is meant to
    > protect public health. *They no longer monitor meat packing plants at all
    > unless invited. *The packers have to pay the USDA to inspect their operation
    > so as to get a "USDA Inspected" sticker. *It is all advertising. *The most
    > egregious violations ever in the meat packing industry happened not 12 miles
    > from where I live. *Over 150 million pounds of "downer" meat - all of it
    > untested - ALL - was recalled. *The problem was it had all been eaten by
    > that time - sold to the school system for children's lunches. *Does that
    > give anyone an idea of just what we are dealing with here?
    >
    > The USDA now is run by corporate special interests. *It exists only to
    > protect the meat industry from the public. *A complete reversal of its
    > original charter.


    Imagine if a US president got elected who agreed wholeheartedly with
    the above paragraph. Imagine a president who believed in those
    "original charter[s]."
    Imagine a president who doesn't have contempt for the New Deal,
    Keynesian economics, and the goal of eliminating poverty in America,
    as expressed in LBJ's Great Society initiatives.

    Imagine America moving away from a profit worshipping system to a
    balanced economy where tax monies are allocated to apolitical civil
    service workers, instead of parasitic private contractors. Imagine
    shysterism relegated to the gray economy, and under threat even there
    as we pursue justice for the poor. No more Halliburton style thievery
    from the US Treasury.

    Of course individuals and voting blocks project their own idealistic
    dreams upon their preferred canidates. I'm hopeful.
    >
    > Paul


    --Bryan

  15. #15
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    On May 31, 5:50*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.

    >
    > Americans foolishly believe the USDA still exists in a form that is meant to
    > protect public health. *They no longer monitor meat packing plants at all
    > unless invited. *The packers have to pay the USDA to inspect their operation
    > so as to get a "USDA Inspected" sticker. *It is all advertising. *The most
    > egregious violations ever in the meat packing industry happened not 12 miles
    > from where I live. *Over 150 million pounds of "downer" meat - all of it
    > untested - ALL - was recalled. *The problem was it had all been eaten by
    > that time - sold to the school system for children's lunches. *Does that
    > give anyone an idea of just what we are dealing with here?
    >
    > The USDA now is run by corporate special interests. *It exists only to
    > protect the meat industry from the public. *A complete reversal of its
    > original charter.


    Imagine if a US president got elected who agreed wholeheartedly with
    the above paragraph. Imagine a president who believed in those
    "original charter[s]."
    Imagine a president who doesn't have contempt for the New Deal,
    Keynesian economics, and the goal of eliminating poverty in America,
    as expressed in LBJ's Great Society initiatives.

    Imagine America moving away from a profit worshipping system to a
    balanced economy where tax monies are allocated to apolitical civil
    service workers, instead of parasitic private contractors. Imagine
    shysterism relegated to the gray economy, and under threat even there
    as we pursue justice for the poor. No more Halliburton style thievery
    from the US Treasury.

    Of course individuals and voting blocks project their own idealistic
    dreams upon their preferred canidates. I'm hopeful.
    >
    > Paul


    --Bryan

  16. #16
    none Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > none wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    >>> and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    >>> the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    >>> testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    >>> were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    >>> all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    >>> Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    >>> nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Quoting from:
    >>> http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >>>
    >>> Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    >>> young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    >>> on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    >>> U.S. beef imports.
    >>>
    >>> The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    >>> faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    >>> took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    >>> reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    >>> failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    >>> media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.

    >> By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    >> In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked
    >> to mad cow disease. None were in America.

    >
    > Not true. According to the CDC, there's been at least 200
    > confirmed cases, 3 in the U.S.
    >
    > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/vcjd/factsheet_nvcjd.htm
    >
    > The actual number may be much higher, due to political
    > interference preventing more tests from being done.
    >
    >> All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when
    >> taken to slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.

    >
    > Not true. There was an attempt to do that during the
    > "enhanced surveillance" program which began in 2004
    > and ended in 2006, but even during that period not
    > all downer cattle were tested.
    >
    > http://www.cidrapsummit.net/cidrap/c...ly1404bse.html
    >
    > In 2006, USDA transitioned to the "ongoing
    > surveillance" program, which has sharply curtailed
    > the number of tests (about 759,000 animals tested
    > during 2004-2006, to about 40,000 per year since
    > then).
    >
    > http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicatio...ongoing_vs.pdf
    >
    > USDA admits that even the enhanced surveillance program
    > was not a food safety program. It was a research program
    > to evaluate the prevalence of BSE, not a screening program
    > to prevent BSE-infected cattle from being slaughtered.
    >
    >> American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle,
    >> which was the primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.

    >
    > But there are loopholes. Cellulosic sausage
    > casings which contain beef residues may be fed to
    > cattle. (This is waste from making hot dogs --
    > the hot dogs are cooked in the casings, which are
    > then removed and disposed by feeding to cattle.)
    >
    > Also, "chicken litter" -- the spilled chicken feed
    > and other material shoveled out of chicken feeding
    > operations -- may be fed to cattle. Downer cattle
    > may be processed into non-ruminant protein supplements,
    > which may be fed to chickens. So, it is not true
    > to say that downer cattle are not being fed to other
    > cattle.
    >
    > http://berkeley.edu/news/media/relea...1/26_moo.shtml
    >
    >> If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly
    >> and passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true,
    >> that does not make it true.
    >>
    >> That includes the media.

    >
    > All of your "facts" are wrong. I've backed up my
    > corrections with links to primary sources. I know
    > much more about this issue than you do, and much
    > of what you "know" ain't true.
    >
    > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.


    Yes indeed, three in the US now. Sorry, the information I quoted was
    slightly out of date. However, all three of those cases were people who
    were exposed to the disease while they were NOT in the US.
    Since nobody is or has been infected with vCJD in the US, I suspect our
    beef is fairly safe.
    I hope you don't mind that I've removed the cross-posting. I don't post
    to usenet groups that I don't read.


  17. #17
    none Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > none wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    >>> and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    >>> the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    >>> testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    >>> were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    >>> all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    >>> Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    >>> nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Quoting from:
    >>> http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >>>
    >>> Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    >>> young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    >>> on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    >>> U.S. beef imports.
    >>>
    >>> The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    >>> faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    >>> took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    >>> reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    >>> failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    >>> media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.

    >> By all means, let them buy their beef elsewhere.
    >> In all of the world, there have been 153 human deaths linked
    >> to mad cow disease. None were in America.

    >
    > Not true. According to the CDC, there's been at least 200
    > confirmed cases, 3 in the U.S.
    >
    > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/vcjd/factsheet_nvcjd.htm
    >
    > The actual number may be much higher, due to political
    > interference preventing more tests from being done.
    >
    >> All American "downer" cattle (those appearing ill when
    >> taken to slaughter) are tested for Mad Cow Disease.

    >
    > Not true. There was an attempt to do that during the
    > "enhanced surveillance" program which began in 2004
    > and ended in 2006, but even during that period not
    > all downer cattle were tested.
    >
    > http://www.cidrapsummit.net/cidrap/c...ly1404bse.html
    >
    > In 2006, USDA transitioned to the "ongoing
    > surveillance" program, which has sharply curtailed
    > the number of tests (about 759,000 animals tested
    > during 2004-2006, to about 40,000 per year since
    > then).
    >
    > http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicatio...ongoing_vs.pdf
    >
    > USDA admits that even the enhanced surveillance program
    > was not a food safety program. It was a research program
    > to evaluate the prevalence of BSE, not a screening program
    > to prevent BSE-infected cattle from being slaughtered.
    >
    >> American cattle are not fed offal from slaughtered cattle,
    >> which was the primary vector for Mad Cow Disease.

    >
    > But there are loopholes. Cellulosic sausage
    > casings which contain beef residues may be fed to
    > cattle. (This is waste from making hot dogs --
    > the hot dogs are cooked in the casings, which are
    > then removed and disposed by feeding to cattle.)
    >
    > Also, "chicken litter" -- the spilled chicken feed
    > and other material shoveled out of chicken feeding
    > operations -- may be fed to cattle. Downer cattle
    > may be processed into non-ruminant protein supplements,
    > which may be fed to chickens. So, it is not true
    > to say that downer cattle are not being fed to other
    > cattle.
    >
    > http://berkeley.edu/news/media/relea...1/26_moo.shtml
    >
    >> If one person, or a million people, or all people, strongly
    >> and passionately believe an unsupported accusation is true,
    >> that does not make it true.
    >>
    >> That includes the media.

    >
    > All of your "facts" are wrong. I've backed up my
    > corrections with links to primary sources. I know
    > much more about this issue than you do, and much
    > of what you "know" ain't true.
    >
    > The Koreans are right to oppose imports of U.S. beef.


    Yes indeed, three in the US now. Sorry, the information I quoted was
    slightly out of date. However, all three of those cases were people who
    were exposed to the disease while they were NOT in the US.
    Since nobody is or has been infected with vCJD in the US, I suspect our
    beef is fairly safe.
    I hope you don't mind that I've removed the cross-posting. I don't post
    to usenet groups that I don't read.


  18. #18
    Jongseon SHIN Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson 쓴 글:
    > none wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    >>> and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    >>> the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    >>> testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    >>> were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    >>> all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    >>> Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    >>> nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Quoting from:
    >>> http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >>>
    >>> Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    >>> young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    >>> on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    >>> U.S. beef imports.
    >>>
    >>> The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    >>> faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    >>> took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    >>> reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    >>> failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    >>> media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    [...]

    Let me add some details about how all these daily rally was formed and
    reproduced. Most conventional media is quite mute about the situation on
    the street. However, most young Koreans , including me, are quite well
    informed about the situation.

    The real information is spread through the Internet.

    Bloggers are writing from their notebook on the street, or from nearby
    PC bangs. A blogger is writing throughout the night every incident,
    gathered via sms and blog comments system. I could only press F5 every
    30 minutes to see what happened on GwangHwaMun, where the demonstrators
    were rallying against the police force.

    There is also already famous Ohmynews ( http://www.ohmynews.com )
    equipped with live independent internet-tv. On its site, I could watch
    literally every moment of the demonstration. There's also another team
    to live-broadcast the street. A professor, named JungGwon Jin, was
    interviewing people there. While watching untidy interviews, I could
    chat with other views live. Some participants were doing propaganda for
    and against the rally, some were re-articulating the live broadcast,
    some were giving information and misinformation. It's like a real good
    virtual demonstration. I could feel how I should feel.

    It's new kind of solidarity emerging from new technology. It's very
    interesting.

    --
    SHIN

  19. #19
    Jongseon SHIN Guest

    Default Re: Koreans Revolt Against U.S. Beef

    Mark Thorson 쓴 글:
    > none wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> I won't eat U.S. beef because the risk is too high,
    >>> and neither will the Koreans. If there were no risk,
    >>> the USDA would not be preventing Creekstone Farms from
    >>> testing their own beef for Mad Cow Disease. If testing
    >>> were being done at the same level as in Japan, where
    >>> all slaughtered cattle are tested, the true extent of
    >>> Mad Cow Disease in U.S. herds would be revealed, and
    >>> nobody would eat U.S. beef.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Quoting from:
    >>> http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/...Beef-Rally.php
    >>>
    >>> Thousands of South Koreans, mostly students and other
    >>> young people, have held similar vigils and street rallies
    >>> on a near daily basis against the April 18 deal to resume
    >>> U.S. beef imports.
    >>>
    >>> The protests are one of the biggest domestic challenges
    >>> faced so far by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who
    >>> took office three months ago. Lee last week sought to
    >>> reassure the country over the safety of U.S. beef, but
    >>> failed to ease public anger, which has been fanned by
    >>> media reports questioning the safety of U.S. beef.


    [...]

    Let me add some details about how all these daily rally was formed and
    reproduced. Most conventional media is quite mute about the situation on
    the street. However, most young Koreans , including me, are quite well
    informed about the situation.

    The real information is spread through the Internet.

    Bloggers are writing from their notebook on the street, or from nearby
    PC bangs. A blogger is writing throughout the night every incident,
    gathered via sms and blog comments system. I could only press F5 every
    30 minutes to see what happened on GwangHwaMun, where the demonstrators
    were rallying against the police force.

    There is also already famous Ohmynews ( http://www.ohmynews.com )
    equipped with live independent internet-tv. On its site, I could watch
    literally every moment of the demonstration. There's also another team
    to live-broadcast the street. A professor, named JungGwon Jin, was
    interviewing people there. While watching untidy interviews, I could
    chat with other views live. Some participants were doing propaganda for
    and against the rally, some were re-articulating the live broadcast,
    some were giving information and misinformation. It's like a real good
    virtual demonstration. I could feel how I should feel.

    It's new kind of solidarity emerging from new technology. It's very
    interesting.

    --
    SHIN

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