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Thread: Kohlrabi Redux

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Kohlrabi Redux

    I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    them in the pot at the same time.

    I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    I'm willing to invest.

  2. #2
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    > experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    > do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    > a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    > soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    > and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    > them in the pot at the same time.
    >
    > I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    > pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    > I'm willing to invest.


    Any interest in a stuffed kohlrabi recipe?
    --
    JL

  3. #3
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux



    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    > experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    > do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    > a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    > soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    > and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    > them in the pot at the same time.
    >
    > I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    > pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    > I'm willing to invest.


    It is very good roasted. I peel and cut them into 1/2 - 1 inch cubes (ish)
    along with small onion, carrots and parsnips.

    I have some in a bowl atm with olive oil, seasoning and herbs and garlic.

    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    On Wed, 15 Dec 2010 03:04:00 -0800, Joseph Littleshoes
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    >> I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    >> experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    >> do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    >> a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    >> soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    >> and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    >> them in the pot at the same time.
    >>
    >> I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    >> pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    >> I'm willing to invest.

    >
    >Any interest in a stuffed kohlrabi recipe?


    You're so full of **** I'm certain you use kohlrabi as a perptual butt
    plug.

  5. #5
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > > I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    > > experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    > > do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    > > a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    > > soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    > > and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    > > them in the pot at the same time.
    > >
    > > I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    > > pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    > > I'm willing to invest.

    >
    > Any interest in a stuffed kohlrabi recipe?


    I doubt it. To stuff a kohlrabi, you'd have
    to carve a pocket in it, right? That would
    be like stuffing a potato. More work than
    I care to do.

  6. #6
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I've bought several more kohlrabis since my first
    > experience. This is a great vegetable! It doesn't
    > do well pan-fried, but it is excellent boiled for
    > a half hour or so. I use it in the various barley
    > soups I make. Barley takes a long time to cook,
    > and kohlrabi takes about the same time, so I put
    > them in the pot at the same time.
    >
    > I suppose maybe if I boiled it first, then I could
    > pan-fry it. But that seems like more work than
    > I'm willing to invest.



    They're pretty good peeled and sliced raw. Not too much work with that.

    Bob



  7. #7
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    > They're pretty good peeled and sliced raw. Not too much work with that.


    I should give that a try. I like raw vegetables. I frequently eat turnips
    raw, and enjoy broccoli stems.


    --
    Day 679 of the "no grouchy usenet posts" project.
    Current music playing: "Night Terrors" (Laura Marling)



  8. #8
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Kohlrabi Redux

    On Wed, 15 Dec 2010 11:16:43 -0000, "Ophelia" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >


    >It is very good roasted. I peel and cut them into 1/2 - 1 inch cubes (ish)
    >along with small onion, carrots and parsnips.


    This is a truism. Those who love shredded cabbage sauteed in bacon
    drippings, served with haluski or broad noodles, should know that
    small (!) kohlrabis cut into matchsticks or thin French Fry strips,
    sautee rather easily and develop a sweet nutty flavor like sauteed
    cabbage. You can also shred them in a FP, (think potatoes for latkes),
    and sautee in bacon fat or lard w/ shredded onion, served as a side
    dish for pork chops or roasted loin.

    Caveat: Markets keep putting up the big kohlrabis, which tend to be
    tough and woody. These can be used, sure, after boiling, but the tiny
    ones are the most tender and flavorful. COnsider cutting in dices, and
    adding to mixed Southern greens (collards/mustard/turnip). If you have
    no kohlrabis, you can do this with cabbage hearts or inner brocolli
    stems (green parts trimmed off).

    I grew up peeling the brocolli stems and dipping them (the white
    parts) in salt as a snack. Ditto cabbage hearts when Mom made stuffed
    cabbage or Szekely gulyas, which normally do not use the cabbage
    hearts. Fresh young ones have a mild peppery flavor.

    Alex

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