Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

  1. #1
    Stu Guest

    Default To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    Thatís the great debate among bakers. A raft of simplified recipes is
    luring amateurs to the stove, but traditionalists find the results
    hard to swallow

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...rticle1596914/

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Wed, 09 Jun 2010 15:10:25 -0500, Stu <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thatís the great debate among bakers. A raft of simplified recipes is
    > luring amateurs to the stove, but traditionalists find the results
    > hard to swallow
    >
    > http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...rticle1596914/


    I've tried two different no knead methods and have been equally
    disappointed with both.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Jun 9, 2:44*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 09 Jun 2010 15:10:25 -0500, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > > That s the great debate among bakers. A raft of simplified recipes is
    > > luring amateurs to the stove, but traditionalists find the results
    > > hard to swallow

    >
    > >http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...ead-or-not-to-...

    >
    > I've tried two different no knead methods and have been equally
    > disappointed with both. *
    >
    > --
    > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.


    The no knead method I use works really well. I have my own sourdough
    starter and I use it in a no knead methodology and I get wonderful
    results.

    What happened when you tried those methods? What didn't work for you?


  4. #4
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Jun 9, 1:10*pm, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:


    I read the article.

    I will agree that the traditional methodology of bread making is
    wonderful and I do it when I want to lose myself in
    the contemplation of kneading.

    I don't do the no knead style that has you make a bunch and store it
    in the frig. I make one loaf at a time since
    normally it's just me or I have some friends over for dinner. Even
    at that, using my no knead method it is a two
    day deal, the first day I feed the starter (overnight) and the next
    morning I put the bread to rise and bake it off
    in the afternoon.

    I don't have a lot of judgement either way. I figure each individual
    can make bread the way it makes them happiest.

    I don't have a bread machine, mostly because I don't feel I make
    enough to warrent the purchase price. I have friends
    who swear by theirs though.




  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Wed, 9 Jun 2010 14:48:39 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > The no knead method I use works really well. I have my own sourdough
    > starter and I use it in a no knead methodology and I get wonderful
    > results.


    These were the current fad, not sourdough starter.
    >
    > What happened when you tried those methods? What didn't work for you?


    Basically they were too "heavy" when fully cooked. They looked and
    acted great until eating time. Did the knock test, sounded good but
    it wasn't. baked one batch using the covered dutch oven method and
    the other batch directly on tile. Neither one was a do over AFAIWC.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  6. #6
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Jun 9, 3:11*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 9 Jun 2010 14:48:39 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    >
    > <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > The no knead method I use works really well. *I have my own sourdough
    > > starter and I use it in a no knead methodology and I get wonderful
    > > results.

    >
    > These were the current fad, not sourdough starter.
    >
    >
    >
    > > What happened when you tried those methods? *What didn't work for you?

    >
    > Basically they were too "heavy" when fully cooked. *They looked and
    > acted great until eating time. *Did the knock test, sounded good but
    > it wasn't. *baked one batch using the covered dutch oven method and
    > the other batch directly on tile. *Neither one was a do over AFAIWC.
    >
    > --
    > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.


    When you say 'heavy' was the texture gummy or sticky or wet?

    I've experimented with the no knead a lot and I've found that the
    lightest and best interior took a longer rising time
    than what the original recipe called for. The no knead recipe
    Bittman used called for 4 hours, usually I let mine sit
    for about 6 and it is much better. But it may be because I use
    sourdough starter ...

    The covered dutch oven method works great, but I've found that instead
    of the baking time after you remove the lid being
    15 - 20 minutes, I need to let it go for about 30 to make sure the
    interior is light.

    I guess it's all in if you are willing to play with the methodology
    till you find what works for you. I'm glad I did because
    I really like being able to put bread to rise in the morning and have
    a hot fresh loaf for dinner that evening.


  7. #7
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    I had great results using Jim Lahey's no=knead method in my old
    cast-iron roaster (aka dutch oven). I've had equally good results using
    traditional methods involving kneading in a dutch oven on camping trips.
    I've never had great results in my home oven. Given this data, I can
    only assume the dutch ovens are the secret.

    D.M.

  8. #8
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Wed, 09 Jun 2010 17:39:26 -0700, Don Martinich <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I had great results using Jim Lahey's no=knead method in my old
    >cast-iron roaster (aka dutch oven). I've had equally good results using
    >traditional methods involving kneading in a dutch oven on camping trips.
    >I've never had great results in my home oven. Given this data, I can
    >only assume the dutch ovens are the secret.
    >
    >D.M.


    You are talking about two different things - not using old fashioned
    kneading, which is dough prep, and methods of baking the final dough.

    You can put a lump of traditionally kneaded and well-risen dough into
    a Dutch oven to bake and you'll have results similar to Lahey's
    recipe. You can also use no-knead methods, or the stretch and fold
    technique for just about any sort of bread you make - loaf pans,
    artisan types, etc.

    Lahey's flavor and texture are developed by a small amount of yeast
    left to ferment for a long time in a very high hydration dough. The
    Advantage of the Dutch oven is that it captures moisture (steam, at
    that point) and helps develop that terrific crust.

    I rarely do kneading. This is what can happen:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2564880...7623433991586/



    Boron


  9. #9
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: To knead or not to knead: the great bread debate

    On Jun 9, 6:39*pm, Boron Elgar <boron_el...@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > I rarely do kneading. *This is what can happen:
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/2564880...7623433991586/
    >
    > Boron


    You are as much a bread artist as breadmaker. I don't ever seem to
    be able to take the time and effort
    to do all those wonderful different types.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32