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Thread: Kitchen sponge

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Kitchen sponge

    I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.

    The reason - household sponges.

    I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    sanitize.

    You?

    Dimitri


  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    In article <i7iqlo$4vq$[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    I use a small amount of bleach in the dish water.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i7iqlo$4vq$[email protected]..
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for
    > restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?


    I started doing that after I heard it somewhere.


  4. #4
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 1:29*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    I don't use sponges in the kitchen - I use dishrags, and wash them
    regularly, adding Clorox 2 to the hot water.

    N.

  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On 9/24/2010 1:29 PM, Dimitri wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    Never use them, use wash cloths and replace them twice a day with clean
    ones. They go into the wash, get some bleach in with them and there you
    are. I do use a scrub brush as my main dish washing tool. It resides in
    a container with bleach in it and is changed daily also. As we both have
    compromised immune systems we are careful.

  6. #6
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 2:29*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    I don't own a kitchen sponge. I purchased a s--t-load of dishcloths
    and use them with abandon. I grab a fresh one for any dish washing,
    another for counter cleaning, fridge cleaning etc. They are cheap,
    wash easily and owe me nothing. Sponges get ratty looking, stained,
    wear down.....I can't think of a good reason to have one.

  7. #7
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge


    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i7iqlo$4vq$[email protected]..
    >I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?


    I keep a couple on hand and toss them in the dishwasher every evening. Same
    with scrub brushes etc.

    Felice



  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    George wrote on Fri, 24 Sep 2010 14:15:59 -0500:

    > On 9/24/2010 1:29 PM, Dimitri wrote:
    >> I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set
    >> for restaurants.
    >>
    >> The reason - household sponges.
    >>
    >> I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a
    >> boil and to sanitize.


    >Never use them, use wash cloths and replace them twice a day with clean
    >ones. They go into the wash, get some bleach in with them and there you
    >are.


    It is much easier to put the kitchen sponge into the covered compartment
    of the dishwasher when I remember or sense a smell. This does certainly
    remove odors. I don't care to collect a week's worth of smelly rags and,
    in any case, I very seldom use bleach since my bath towels are colored.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 2:29*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    No sponge. Handi-wipes and paper towels. I cut the handi-wipes
    in half, and use one (mostly for wiping counters) until it looks
    unappealing, then I throw it away. I don't tend to put food right
    on the counters, so I don't care if they're sanitized. Hell, I don't
    care if anything is sanitized; I have a fully functioning immune
    system.

    I use paper towels for what little hand dishwashing I do (sharp
    knives, anything that's too big for the dishwasher).

    Cindy Hamilton

  10. #10
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    Dimitri wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for
    > restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?


    Ugh, I have to have my green and yellow sponges, but I try to
    change them often. I know this is a failing in my kitchen
    sanitation. Heh. I'll start zapping mine as you do.

    nancy

  11. #11
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge


    On 24-Sep-2010, "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for
    > restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?


    I have not used a sponge in more than 20 years. I use tea-towels, which can
    be laundered after a few uses, or paper towels which are tossed immediately.
    For the occasional really tough cleaning jobs I use a brush, then toss it
    in the dishwasher.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  12. #12
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 11:29:10 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    >The reason - household sponges.
    >
    >I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    >sanitize.
    >
    >You?


    I use a Dobie sponge and it gets sanitized everytime I run my
    dishwasher.

  13. #13
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 12:36*pm, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    > > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for
    > > restaurants.

    >
    > > The reason - household sponges.

    >
    > > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > > sanitize.

    >
    > > You?

    >
    > Ugh, I have to have my green and yellow sponges, but I try to
    > change them often. *I know this is a failing in my kitchen
    > sanitation. *Heh. *I'll start zapping mine as you do. *
    >
    > nancy


    The microwave is the best way to sanitize a sponge, that is correct.

  14. #14
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge


    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i7iqlo$4vq$[email protected]..
    >I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >


    Little bleach in cold water, soak.

    Paul



  15. #15
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On 9/24/2010 2:27 PM, James Silverton wrote:
    > George wrote on Fri, 24 Sep 2010 14:15:59 -0500:
    >
    >> On 9/24/2010 1:29 PM, Dimitri wrote:
    >>> I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set
    >>> for restaurants.
    >>>
    >>> The reason - household sponges.
    >>>
    >>> I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a
    >>> boil and to sanitize.

    >
    >> Never use them, use wash cloths and replace them twice a day with
    >> clean ones. They go into the wash, get some bleach in with them and
    >> there you are.

    >
    > It is much easier to put the kitchen sponge into the covered compartment
    > of the dishwasher when I remember or sense a smell. This does certainly
    > remove odors. I don't care to collect a week's worth of smelly rags and,
    > in any case, I very seldom use bleach since my bath towels are colored.
    >
    >

    I don't collect a weeks worth of smelly rags James, they never smell,
    are rinsed, go into the utility room in a basket and are washed every
    few days. Our bath towels are colored too, the dish rags go in with the
    whites. Everyone does things differently, not wrongly.

  16. #16
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 11:29*am, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for restaurants.
    >
    > The reason - household sponges.
    >
    > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > sanitize.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Dimitri


    It's a wonder we every made it through childhood what with many moms
    using the same old dish rag for several days.

  17. #17
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    On Sep 24, 12:36*pm, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    > > I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set for
    > > restaurants.

    >
    > > The reason - household sponges.

    >
    > > I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a boil and to
    > > sanitize.

    >
    > > You?

    >
    > Ugh, I have to have my green and yellow sponges, but I try to
    > change them often. *I know this is a failing in my kitchen
    > sanitation. *Heh. *I'll start zapping mine as you do. *
    >
    > nancy


    If you ate enough dirt as a kid you'd have a healthy immune system.

  18. #18
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    George wrote on Fri, 24 Sep 2010 16:07:19 -0500:

    > On 9/24/2010 2:27 PM, James Silverton wrote:
    >> George wrote on Fri, 24 Sep 2010 14:15:59 -0500:
    >>
    >>> On 9/24/2010 1:29 PM, Dimitri wrote:
    >>>> I heard most homes would FAIL the sanitation standards set
    >>>> for restaurants.
    >>>>
    >>>> The reason - household sponges.
    >>>>
    >>>> I regularly zap mine in the nuker to bring any liquid to a
    >>>> boil and to sanitize.

    >>
    >>> Never use them, use wash cloths and replace them twice a day
    >>> with clean ones. They go into the wash, get some bleach in
    >>> with them and there you are.

    >>
    >> It is much easier to put the kitchen sponge into the covered
    >> compartment of the dishwasher when I remember or sense a
    >> smell. This does certainly remove odors. I don't care to
    >> collect a week's worth of smelly rags and, in any case, I
    >> very seldom use bleach since my bath towels are colored.
    >>

    >I don't collect a weeks worth of smelly rags James, they never smell,
    >are rinsed, go into the utility room in a basket and are washed every
    >few days. Our bath towels are colored too, the dish rags go in with the
    >whites. Everyone does things differently, not wrongly.


    Who said wrong? :-) I guess it depends on the size of your household.
    Most of my stuff is wash and wear but I have one full load of towels,
    athletic socks and underwear once a week.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  19. #19
    Michael O'Connor Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge


    > I don't use sponges in the kitchen - I use dishrags, and wash them
    > regularly, adding Clorox 2 to the hot water.
    >
    > N.


    After the Mythbusters episode where they were testing the amount of
    bacteria on household items, and found the kitchen sponge to be far
    and away the filthiest thing they could find, I stopped buying sponges
    and went to dishrags, which are used once and washed in the washing
    machine.

  20. #20
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Kitchen sponge

    Chemo the Clown wrote:
    > On Sep 24, 12:36 pm, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:


    >> Ugh, I have to have my green and yellow sponges, but I try to
    >> change them often. I know this is a failing in my kitchen
    >> sanitation. Heh. I'll start zapping mine as you do.


    > If you ate enough dirt as a kid you'd have a healthy immune system.


    One time we went on vacation and before leaving, I did the usual
    thing, took out the garbage so I wouldn't come back to a stinky
    house.

    Return trip wasn't a good one, 7 hour delay in the airport and
    wound up walking in the door at 2:30am. Arrived to a stench
    that would make you think a raccoon died in the house somewhere.
    The end to a perfect day. Argh.

    Nope, not a raccoon. I learned my lesson, before you leave for
    vacation, toss the sponge. It seemed fine when I left. There's
    a reason they call sponges Bacteria condos.

    nancy

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