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Thread: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

  1. #1
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.

    So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.

    I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    experiment.)

    Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but the taste of
    molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.

    Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that, it'll be back
    to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.

    -S-



  2. #2
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Jun 19, 11:18*am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > "unrefined" on the package. *It's got a light brown color to it. *(The
    > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > be described as watered-down molasses. *It's OK, but the taste of
    > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. *After that, it'll be back
    > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.
    >
    > -S-


    Uh, yeah. The "brown" in brown sugar is molasses. Your unbleached
    organic and turbinado sugars are all basically the same, which are
    sugars not refined to the point of clear or whiteness. So any simple
    syrup you make with them will be molasses-ey.

    You want pure clear simple syrup? Start with pure sugar. Yes it's
    refined, that's why"sugar" is white and not brown. No molasses! There
    is no such thing as "different kinds of better, more organic, etc."
    white sugar. The whitest purest sugar is the best.

    John Kuthe...

  3. #3
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On 2010-06-19 09:18:50 -0700, Steve Freides said:

    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but the taste of
    > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that, it'll be
    > back to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.


    I don't know the scope or intent of your quest. After having a drink
    made for me with a curious "sweet", I picked up a bottle. It's made
    from agave. It calls itself Agave Nectar. It purports to be 100% of
    same. Good luck.
    --
    If God didn't want us to eat animals, why did he make them out of meat?


  4. #4
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Jun 19, 9:18*am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > "unrefined" on the package. *It's got a light brown color to it. *(The
    > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > be described as watered-down molasses. *It's OK, but the taste of
    > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. *After that, it'll be back
    > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.
    >
    > -S-


    You just reminded me that I need to make some simple sugar.

    I make a mint simple sugar by putting a handful of mint leaves in the
    syrup after you take it off the heat. Leave
    the mint in there till the syrup cools down by about half and then
    remove it. Strain the simple sugar through a
    small sieve when you put it in your bottle or jar. This is
    wonderful in iced tea it also make a fabulous vodka
    and tonic with just a bit of the mint simple sugar and a chunk of lime
    squeezed in there. Yum.

    I'm also going to make some others for summer drinks. I've been
    thinking about a basil simple sugar.

  5. #5
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Jun 19, 11:19*am, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jun 19, 9:18*am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.

    >
    > > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.

    >
    > > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > > "unrefined" on the package. *It's got a light brown color to it. *(The
    > > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > > experiment.)

    >
    > > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > > be described as watered-down molasses. *It's OK, but the taste of
    > > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.

    >
    > > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > > next, although I'm expecting similar results. *After that, it'll be back
    > > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.

    >
    > > -S-

    >
    > You just reminded me that I need to make some simple sugar.
    >
    > I make a mint simple sugar by putting a handful of mint leaves in the
    > syrup after you take it off the heat. * Leave
    > the mint in there till the syrup cools down by about half and then
    > remove it. *Strain the simple sugar through a
    > small sieve when you put it in your bottle or jar. * * This is
    > wonderful in iced tea it also make a fabulous vodka
    > and tonic with just a bit of the mint simple sugar and a chunk of lime
    > squeezed in there. *Yum.
    >
    > I'm also going to make some others for summer drinks. * I've been
    > thinking about a basil simple sugar.


    Oh..forgot....I'm going to make one with lemon balm (mint). I think
    the lemony thing would be great.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 11:07:36 -0700 (PDT), John Kuthe
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jun 19, 11:18*am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    > >
    > > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    > >
    > > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > > "unrefined" on the package. *It's got a light brown color to it. *(The
    > > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > > experiment.)
    > >
    > > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > > be described as watered-down molasses. *It's OK, but the taste of
    > > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    > >
    > > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > > next, although I'm expecting similar results. *After that, it'll be back
    > > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.
    > >
    > > -S-

    >
    > Uh, yeah. The "brown" in brown sugar is molasses. Your unbleached
    > organic and turbinado sugars are all basically the same, which are
    > sugars not refined to the point of clear or whiteness. So any simple
    > syrup you make with them will be molasses-ey.
    >
    > You want pure clear simple syrup? Start with pure sugar. Yes it's
    > refined, that's why"sugar" is white and not brown. No molasses! There
    > is no such thing as "different kinds of better, more organic, etc."
    > white sugar. The whitest purest sugar is the best.
    >


    Some people have to find out the hard way.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 11:19:02 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You just reminded me that I need to make some simple sugar.


    Simple *syrup*.
    >
    > I make a mint simple sugar by putting a handful of mint leaves in the
    > syrup after you take it off the heat. Leave
    > the mint in there till the syrup cools down by about half and then
    > remove it. Strain the simple sugar through a
    > small sieve when you put it in your bottle or jar. This is
    > wonderful in iced tea it also make a fabulous vodka
    > and tonic with just a bit of the mint simple sugar and a chunk of lime
    > squeezed in there. Yum.


    Oh, that's right! I was going to make some for Mojito's this summer.
    Thanks for the reminder, I should try to find mint today for Mojito's
    tomorrow.
    >
    > I'm also going to make some others for summer drinks. I've been
    > thinking about a basil simple sugar.


    Try fresh sage. I had a variation of Mojito last summer made with
    sage and Junipero Gin that was absolutely killer. OH! I have lots of
    sage in the backyard. I won't have to go out and buy mint, I'll use
    that instead. Thanks for the brain nudge.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  8. #8
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    John Kuthe wrote:
    > On Jun 19, 11:18 am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    >> Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of
    >> better, more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >>
    >> So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    >> learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >>
    >> I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    >> "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    >> other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    >> experiment.)
    >>
    >> Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a
    >> traditional recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something
    >> that might best be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but
    >> the taste of molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as
    >> sweet.
    >>
    >> Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the
    >> Turbinado next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that,
    >> it'll be back to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple
    >> syrup.
    >>
    >> -S-

    >
    > Uh, yeah. The "brown" in brown sugar is molasses. Your unbleached
    > organic and turbinado sugars are all basically the same, which are
    > sugars not refined to the point of clear or whiteness. So any simple
    > syrup you make with them will be molasses-ey.
    >
    > You want pure clear simple syrup? Start with pure sugar. Yes it's
    > refined, that's why"sugar" is white and not brown. No molasses! There
    > is no such thing as "different kinds of better, more organic, etc."
    > white sugar. The whitest purest sugar is the best.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    I never claimed to be smart, just willing to experiment. No one in
    the earlier thread came out and said that using these other sugars would
    leave me with something that tasted like watered-down molasses. It's an
    experiment that cost me about $3, and the result is still usable, if not
    my first choice, so I'm glad I did it. Mind you, it doesn't taste only
    a little like molasses, it tastes a lot like molasses and, to boot, it's
    also definitely not as sweet.

    Maybe I'll try mostly refined and a little bit of one of these things
    next time ...

    -S-



  9. #9
    JL Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments



    Steve Freides wrote:
    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but the taste of
    > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that, it'll be back
    > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.
    >
    > -S-
    >
    >

    Try usaing white wine insted of water

    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  10. #10
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    In article <2010061911082555558-xxx@yyyzzz>, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I don't know the scope or intent of your quest. After having a drink
    > made for me with a curious "sweet", I picked up a bottle. It's made
    > from agave. It calls itself Agave Nectar. It purports to be 100% of
    > same. Good luck.


    Is that kind of like Kool Aid is made of 100% Kool Aid?

    Agave nectar, not to be confused with agave juice, is made from agave
    juice:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agave_nectar

    The juice is processed, sometimes in a similar way to HFCS, to convert
    the natural sugar in the juice into fructose. It is then concentrated
    to make a thin syrup.

    Some people think fructose is great, as it is sweeter than regular
    sugar, so it takes less for a given amount of sweetness. Others,
    including medical doctors, think fructose is a poison, and should be
    avoided (along with regular sugars) in any significant quantity.

    Agave nectar is one of the few things sold at those "pill" stores that
    isn't in pill form. A little bottle is about US$6.00. I've also seen
    it for sale at Costco.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    sf wrote:

    > Try fresh sage. I had a variation of Mojito last summer made with
    > sage and Junipero Gin that was absolutely killer. OH! I have lots of
    > sage in the backyard. I won't have to go out and buy mint, I'll use
    > that instead. Thanks for the brain nudge.


    That sounds intriguing. It might be interesting to use that flavor
    combination (gin and sage) in a variation of a bloody bullshot.

    Bob



  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    Steve wrote:

    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and "unrefined"
    > on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The other kind I
    > bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best be
    > described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but the taste of molasses is
    > quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that, it'll be back
    > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.


    In that original thread I mentioned both agave nectar (because you seemed to
    think that "less processed" equates to "more healthy") and glucose syrup (as
    a pure simple sugar).

    Bob



  13. #13
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments


    > sf wrote:
    >
    >> Try fresh sage. I had a variation of Mojito last summer made with
    >> sage and Junipero Gin that was absolutely killer. OH! I have lots of
    >> sage in the backyard. I won't have to go out and buy mint, I'll use
    >> that instead. Thanks for the brain nudge.

    >



    I'll take your word for it, but it doesn't sound appealing. I had
    a mojito a few years ago made with basil instead of mint. Ick. Also ugh.

    gloria p

  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 15:08:41 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <2010061911082555558-xxx@yyyzzz>, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I don't know the scope or intent of your quest. After having a drink
    >> made for me with a curious "sweet", I picked up a bottle. It's made
    >> from agave. It calls itself Agave Nectar. It purports to be 100% of
    >> same. Good luck.

    >
    > Is that kind of like Kool Aid is made of 100% Kool Aid?
    >
    > Agave nectar, not to be confused with agave juice, is made from agave
    > juice:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agave_nectar
    >
    > The juice is processed, sometimes in a similar way to HFCS, to convert
    > the natural sugar in the juice into fructose. It is then concentrated
    > to make a thin syrup.
    >
    > Some people think fructose is great, as it is sweeter than regular
    > sugar, so it takes less for a given amount of sweetness. Others,
    > including medical doctors, think fructose is a poison, and should be
    > avoided (along with regular sugars) in any significant quantity.


    shouldn't that be 'some doctors' or even 'some quack doctors'?

    your pal,
    blake

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of better,
    > more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    >
    > So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    >
    > I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    > other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > experiment.)
    >
    > Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a traditional
    > recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something that might best
    > be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but the taste of
    > molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as sweet.
    >
    > Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the Turbinado
    > next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that, it'll be back
    > to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple syrup.
    >
    > -S-


    I must have missed that post, sorry!

    Mom used Turbinado, but cut the amount used by 25%.
    It tends to be a bit stronger and richer.

    Hope this helps!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > John Kuthe wrote:
    > > On Jun 19, 11:18 am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > >> Y'all were pretty useless when I asked about different kinds of
    > >> better, more organic, etc., sugar for use in making simple syrup.
    > >>
    > >> So, I bought two different kinds and made one of them today, and am
    > >> learning first-hand why it's a bad idea.
    > >>
    > >> I used "organic whole cane sugar" which says "unbleached" and
    > >> "unrefined" on the package. It's got a light brown color to it. (The
    > >> other kind I bought was Turbinado, and that will be the next
    > >> experiment.)
    > >>
    > >> Organic, whole cane, unbleached, unrefined sugar, used in a
    > >> traditional recipe of equal parts sugar and water, yields something
    > >> that might best be described as watered-down molasses. It's OK, but
    > >> the taste of molasses is quite strong, and it's definitely _not_ as
    > >> sweet.
    > >>
    > >> Sooo, I consider this experiment a failure, and we'll try the
    > >> Turbinado next, although I'm expecting similar results. After that,
    > >> it'll be back to regular, plain, old, refined white sugar for simple
    > >> syrup.
    > >>
    > >> -S-

    > >
    > > Uh, yeah. The "brown" in brown sugar is molasses. Your unbleached
    > > organic and turbinado sugars are all basically the same, which are
    > > sugars not refined to the point of clear or whiteness. So any simple
    > > syrup you make with them will be molasses-ey.
    > >
    > > You want pure clear simple syrup? Start with pure sugar. Yes it's
    > > refined, that's why"sugar" is white and not brown. No molasses! There
    > > is no such thing as "different kinds of better, more organic, etc."
    > > white sugar. The whitest purest sugar is the best.
    > >
    > > John Kuthe...

    >
    > I never claimed to be smart, just willing to experiment. No one in
    > the earlier thread came out and said that using these other sugars would
    > leave me with something that tasted like watered-down molasses. It's an
    > experiment that cost me about $3, and the result is still usable, if not
    > my first choice, so I'm glad I did it. Mind you, it doesn't taste only
    > a little like molasses, it tastes a lot like molasses and, to boot, it's
    > also definitely not as sweet.
    >
    > Maybe I'll try mostly refined and a little bit of one of these things
    > next time ...
    >
    > -S-


    The use of raw sugar is never going to taste the same as white sugar.
    It will end up being a matter of taste preference. ;-)

    Good luck!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 10:03:16 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > > sf wrote:
    > >
    > >> Try fresh sage. I had a variation of Mojito last summer made with
    > >> sage and Junipero Gin that was absolutely killer. OH! I have lots of
    > >> sage in the backyard. I won't have to go out and buy mint, I'll use
    > >> that instead. Thanks for the brain nudge.

    > >

    >
    >
    > I'll take your word for it, but it doesn't sound appealing. I had
    > a mojito a few years ago made with basil instead of mint. Ick. Also ugh.
    >

    The flavor wasn't overpowering. My first reaction was ugh when I read
    the ingredient list, but it tasted fine.

    I made a sage simple sugar yesterday, now I need to buy some gin and
    soda water.


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  18. #18
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    In article <ol3v4tpxscec$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 15:08:41 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:


    > > Some people think fructose is great, as it is sweeter than regular
    > > sugar, so it takes less for a given amount of sweetness. Others,
    > > including medical doctors, think fructose is a poison, and should be
    > > avoided (along with regular sugars) in any significant quantity.

    >
    > shouldn't that be 'some doctors' or even 'some quack doctors'?


    Sorry, I was thinking "some", but it didn't get to my fingers. This is
    an interesting, but long (1.5 hours) video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

    "Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of
    Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues
    that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be
    cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin."

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 16:08:59 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <ol3v4tpxscec$.[email protected]>,
    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 15:08:41 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    >
    >>> Some people think fructose is great, as it is sweeter than regular
    >>> sugar, so it takes less for a given amount of sweetness. Others,
    >>> including medical doctors, think fructose is a poison, and should be
    >>> avoided (along with regular sugars) in any significant quantity.

    >>
    >> shouldn't that be 'some doctors' or even 'some quack doctors'?

    >
    > Sorry, I was thinking "some", but it didn't get to my fingers. This is
    > an interesting, but long (1.5 hours) video:
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM
    >
    > "Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of
    > Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues
    > that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be
    > cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin."


    well, i'm not going to watch his movie. it just sounded a little fringe-y
    to me.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: Kinds of sugar for simple syrup, the Experiments

    On Jun 21, 2:15*pm, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 16:08:59 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:
    > > In article <ol3v4tpxscec$.1h6bctrbrom94....@40tude.net>,
    > > *blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> On Sat, 19 Jun 2010 15:08:41 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    >
    > >>> Some people think fructose is great, as it is sweeter than regular
    > >>> sugar, so it takes less for a given amount of sweetness. *Others,
    > >>> including medical doctors, think fructose is a poison, and should be
    > >>> avoided (along with regular sugars) in any significant quantity.

    >
    > >> shouldn't that be 'some doctors' or even 'some quack doctors'?

    >
    > > Sorry, I was thinking "some", but it didn't get to my fingers. *This is
    > > an interesting, but long (1.5 hours) video:

    >
    > >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

    >
    > > "Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of
    > > Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues
    > > that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be
    > > cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin."

    >
    > well, i'm not going to watch his movie. *it just sounded a little fringe-y
    > to me.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    I've never heard a doctor call sugar poison, but the recommendation is
    to limit the amount you eat or add to your food and drink. It's
    effects on insulin production and obesity (via the calories) are
    pretty well documented by reputable research.

    maxine in ri

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