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Thread: Jujube recipes

  1. #1
    Lin Guest

    Default Jujube recipes

    Yesterday at our Friday Farmer's Market one of the stalls had jujubes.
    Last year I bought some and used them when roasting a chicken along with
    potatoes in the pan. They were very tasty. So, I bought a small basket
    of them and have been contemplating how to prepare them this time --
    it's way too hot for roasting at the moment where I am at.

    I came across this:

    Becky's Favorite Jujube Recipe
    Quick, Easy, Sweet and Filling

    6-12 Jujube fruits (2-4 oz.), sliced and pitted
    1 onion, chopped
    1/4 pound Mushrooms, sliced
    1/4 pound butter
    1/2 pound Meat (goat, lamb or chicken optional), cubed (pre-cooked to
    personal taste)

    Saute onions with butter until they begin to soften, add sliced Jujubes.
    Cook until jujubes begin to crisp on medium to low heat stirring often
    (be careful not to overcook as jujubes are delicate and burn easily).
    Add mushrooms.

    Cook mixture until mushrooms are soft. (or saute mushrooms separate and
    then add to mix.) Add precooked meat. Cook on low flame, stirring
    occasionally for 5 minutes.

    Serve over Rice or Quinoa.
    _____________________________

    I'd be using chicken in this, though I could thaw some lamb instead.
    Chicken was already out. The recipe lacks any mention of seasoning. I
    was thinking a hint of cinnamon might be good. I also have some fresh
    lavender. The rice probably could use some dressing up, too.

    Anyone here have experience with jujubes? If so, how did you use them?

    --Lin

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    On Sat 06 Sep 2008 11:56:14a, Lin told us...

    > Yesterday at our Friday Farmer's Market one of the stalls had jujubes.
    > Last year I bought some and used them when roasting a chicken along with
    > potatoes in the pan. They were very tasty. So, I bought a small basket
    > of them and have been contemplating how to prepare them this time --
    > it's way too hot for roasting at the moment where I am at.
    >
    > I came across this:
    >
    > Becky's Favorite Jujube Recipe
    > Quick, Easy, Sweet and Filling
    >
    > 6-12 Jujube fruits (2-4 oz.), sliced and pitted
    > 1 onion, chopped
    > 1/4 pound Mushrooms, sliced
    > 1/4 pound butter
    > 1/2 pound Meat (goat, lamb or chicken optional), cubed (pre-cooked to
    > personal taste)
    >
    > Saute onions with butter until they begin to soften, add sliced Jujubes.
    > Cook until jujubes begin to crisp on medium to low heat stirring often
    > (be careful not to overcook as jujubes are delicate and burn easily).
    > Add mushrooms.
    >
    > Cook mixture until mushrooms are soft. (or saute mushrooms separate and
    > then add to mix.) Add precooked meat. Cook on low flame, stirring
    > occasionally for 5 minutes.
    >
    > Serve over Rice or Quinoa.
    > _____________________________
    >
    > I'd be using chicken in this, though I could thaw some lamb instead.
    > Chicken was already out. The recipe lacks any mention of seasoning. I
    > was thinking a hint of cinnamon might be good. I also have some fresh
    > lavender. The rice probably could use some dressing up, too.
    >
    > Anyone here have experience with jujubes? If so, how did you use them?
    >
    > --Lin
    >


    Nothing I've made myself, but I've eaten them cooked and mashed to a paste
    as a filling for Chinese steamed buns. They were delicious.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Saturday, 09(IX)/06(VI)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 2dys 11hrs 59mins
    *******************************************
    You're trying to pull a clinton,
    aren't you?
    *******************************************

  3. #3
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Lin wrote:
    > Yesterday at our Friday Farmer's Market one of the stalls had jujubes.



    Chinese date
    Also called Chinese jujube and red date , this olive-sized fruit has
    a leathery skin that, depending on the variety, can be red (most
    common), off-white or almost black. The flavor of the rather dry,
    yellowish flesh is prunelike. The Chinese date is generally imported
    from China, though some are being grown on the West Coast. Some fresh
    fruit is available (mainly in the West), but those found most often
    (usually in Chinese markets) are dried and must be soaked in water
    before using. Chinese cooks use this fruit in both savory and sweet
    dishes.

    � Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.


    http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/jujube.html



    ---



  4. #4
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone here have experience with jujubes? If so, how did you use them?


    I once made Korean samgyetang chicken soup, using recipe below. I
    prefer to order it at a restaurant, though. The soup is always very
    bland, deliberately so, and always needs to be seasoned liberally, at
    least as far as I am concerned.

    From <http://www.asiafood.org/samg.cfm>.

    Victor

    Samgyetang (ginseng chicken soup)

    4 small chickens, one for each serving
    4 fresh ginseng roots
    2 cups glutinous rice
    8 cloves of garlic
    Salt
    Black pepper
    8 chestnuts
    8 dried jujubes

    1. Cut the chicken's belly lengthwise. Remove organs, head and feet --
    wing tips and neck optional, but leave the body whole.

    2. Clean chicken thoroughly and sprinkle with salt. Wash the glutinous
    rice, ginseng and jujubes, and remove the skin from the garlic cloves
    and chestnuts. Slice or leave ginseng, according to taste.

    3. Rinse chicken and stuff each chicken's body cavity with ginseng,
    rice, and garlic.

    4. Sew the body cavity shut.

    5. Put stuffed chickens in a covered pot with 15 cups of water and bring
    to a boil. Lower heat and add jujubes and chestnuts.

    6. Simmer until chicken is thoroughly stewed. Serve unseasoned; diner
    usually adds salt and black pepper to taste, but some cooks add salt
    immediately before serving.


  5. #5
    mequeenbe.nospam Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes



    Lin wrote:
    > Yesterday at our Friday Farmer's Market one of the stalls had jujubes.
    > Last year I bought some and used them when roasting a chicken along with
    > potatoes in the pan. They were very tasty. So, I bought a small basket
    > of them and have been contemplating how to prepare them this time --
    > it's way too hot for roasting at the moment where I am at.
    >
    > I came across this:
    >
    > Becky's Favorite Jujube Recipe
    > Quick, Easy, Sweet and Filling



    > Anyone here have experience with jujubes? If so, how did you use them?
    >
    > --Lin


    omg, when i first saw this i thought you were referring to the little
    round sticky, corn syrup candy, that stuck my teeth together that i
    used to buy when i went to the saturday afternoon movies, about 50
    years ago. then i saw the other posts.

    harriet & critter (j j who is sleeping on his towels)

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    "mequeenbe.nospam" wrote:
    >
    > omg, when i first saw this i thought you were referring to the little
    > round sticky, corn syrup candy, that stuck my teeth together that i
    > used to buy when i went to the saturday afternoon movies, about 50
    > years ago. then i saw the other posts.


    I've had fresh jujubes (the fruit), and it's a lot like
    apple, but without the apple flavor. It's sweet and
    firmer than apple. Not a big deal if you go your whole
    life and never eat a jujube.

    Not like missing bacon! Oy! Those poor Jews!
    One of the greatest pleasures in life, and they
    can't have it!

  7. #7
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Before I read any of the other responses, before I know if anyone else
    did this too, I'm going to fess up and tell y'all that I immediately
    thought of the jujubes candy that I used to get at movie theaters. I
    googled and saw that I was right. Jujubes ARE a sort of chewy jellied
    candy that come in several colors. It turns out that they're also a
    sort of fruit that looks to me a little like a red apple. If you go to
    google images and type "jujubes" in the search box, you get a lot more
    pictures of the candy than you do of the fruit.


    --Lia


  8. #8
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    On Sep 6, 7:07*pm, Julia Altshuler <jaltshu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Before I read any of the other responses, before I know if anyone else
    > did this too, I'm going to fess up and tell y'all that I immediately
    > thought of the jujubes candy that I used to get at movie theaters. *I
    > googled and saw that I was right. *Jujubes ARE a sort of chewy jellied
    > candy that come in several colors. *It turns out that they're also a
    > sort of fruit that looks to me a little like a red apple. *If you go to
    > google images and type "jujubes" in the search box, you get a lot more
    > pictures of the candy than you do of the fruit.
    >
    > --Lia


    You're not the only one! :-)

    Tracy

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Victor wrote:

    > I once made Korean samgyetang chicken soup, using recipe below. I
    > prefer to order it at a restaurant, though. The soup is always very
    > bland, deliberately so, and always needs to be seasoned liberally, at
    > least as far as I am concerned.


    Whenever I've seen it in a Korean restaurant, it was touted as health food,
    something along the lines of "Mom's chicken soup, good for whatever ails
    you". Bland food is what most sick people want.

    Bob


  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Lin wrote:

    > Yesterday at our Friday Farmer's Market one of the stalls had jujubes.
    > Last year I bought some and used them when roasting a chicken along with
    > potatoes in the pan. They were very tasty. So, I bought a small basket of
    > them and have been contemplating how to prepare them this time --
    > it's way too hot for roasting at the moment where I am at.
    >
    > I came across this:
    >
    > Becky's Favorite Jujube Recipe
    > Quick, Easy, Sweet and Filling
    >
    > 6-12 Jujube fruits (2-4 oz.), sliced and pitted
    > 1 onion, chopped
    > 1/4 pound Mushrooms, sliced
    > 1/4 pound butter
    > 1/2 pound Meat (goat, lamb or chicken optional), cubed (pre-cooked to
    > personal taste)
    >
    > Saute onions with butter until they begin to soften, add sliced Jujubes.
    > Cook until jujubes begin to crisp on medium to low heat stirring often (be
    > careful not to overcook as jujubes are delicate and burn easily). Add
    > mushrooms.
    >
    > Cook mixture until mushrooms are soft. (or saute mushrooms separate and
    > then add to mix.) Add precooked meat. Cook on low flame, stirring
    > occasionally for 5 minutes.
    >
    > Serve over Rice or Quinoa.
    > _____________________________
    >
    > I'd be using chicken in this, though I could thaw some lamb instead.
    > Chicken was already out. The recipe lacks any mention of seasoning. I was
    > thinking a hint of cinnamon might be good. I also have some fresh
    > lavender. The rice probably could use some dressing up, too.



    The mushrooms make it a bit trickier. Curry powder ought to work; I'd add it
    at the same time as the onions. Soy sauce and sesame oil would be a good
    alternative; I'd add soy sauce after the mushrooms are cooked and sesame oil
    just before serving. You could season with thyme, rosemary, savory,
    marjoram, or oregano, then stir in some yogurt just before serving. Or
    simply season with salt and pepper and then sprinkle with toasted almonds
    before serving.

    Bob, thinking that's a LOT of butter


  11. #11
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > The mushrooms make it a bit trickier. Curry powder ought to work; I'd
    > add it
    > at the same time as the onions. Soy sauce and sesame oil would be a good
    > alternative; I'd add soy sauce after the mushrooms are cooked and sesame
    > oil
    > just before serving. You could season with thyme, rosemary, savory,
    > marjoram, or oregano, then stir in some yogurt just before serving. Or
    > simply season with salt and pepper and then sprinkle with toasted almonds
    > before serving.


    Nice suggestions. We're out of yogurt, so I will need to get some.

    > Bob, thinking that's a LOT of butter


    Same here. Not that I have ANY intention of using that much butter!

    --Lin

  12. #12
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Jujube recipes

    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Victor wrote:
    >
    > > I once made Korean samgyetang chicken soup, using recipe below. I
    > > prefer to order it at a restaurant, though. The soup is always very
    > > bland, deliberately so, and always needs to be seasoned liberally, at
    > > least as far as I am concerned.

    >
    > Whenever I've seen it in a Korean restaurant, it was touted as health food,
    > something along the lines of "Mom's chicken soup, good for whatever ails
    > you". Bland food is what most sick people want.


    Yes, like many other foods it is considered health food. But, then,
    Koreans, like many other East Asians and Indians make little distinction
    between food and medicine. In this case, it is mostly because the soup
    contains ginseng. Also, jujubes are said to be good for the stomach.
    This soup is always served very hot and, paradoxically, is supposed to
    be eaten in hot weather. Like some other foods, it is proclaimed to be
    good for one's "stamina", this being somewhat of an euphemism,
    obviously.

    Bland food, soups especially, is very popular in Korea, alongside some
    of the most incendiary. Such soups as gomtang, ggori-gomtang,
    kalbitang, doganitang and seolleongtang are just as bland as samgyetang.

    Here in Düsseldorf, local Korean restaurants do not emphasize supposed
    health benefits of any of their dishes. Their clientele tends to be
    very heavily Korean, with some Japanese sprinkled in, and only
    relatively few Europeans, though.

    Victor

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