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Thread: Jam, jelly and jello

  1. #1
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Jam, jelly and jello

    OK. This still confuses me. I'm hoping some of the USA folks can
    'enlighten' me.

    In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread, scones,
    between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from fruit (and sometimes
    veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky' i.e. it sometimes contains nice
    bits of fruit and sometimes it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).

    'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains a bunch of
    sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring that you mix with
    (boiling) water which you allow to cool and then refrigerate until it
    'sets'. It is often served with custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered
    that this what is known as 'jello' in the USA.

    So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > OK. This still confuses me. I'm hoping some of the USA folks can
    > 'enlighten' me.
    >
    > In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread, scones,
    > between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from fruit (and sometimes
    > veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky' i.e. it sometimes contains nice
    > bits of fruit and sometimes it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).
    >
    > 'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains a bunch of
    > sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring that you mix with
    > (boiling) water which you allow to cool and then refrigerate until it
    > 'sets'. It is often served with custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered
    > that this what is known as 'jello' in the USA.

    The first time I worked with Brits and Ozzies I was confused by their
    terminology for what Americans call jello. Jello is actually a brand
    name that has become the generic for a gelatin dessert over the years.
    >
    > So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    as a clear condiment.
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >

    Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    called butters here in the USA. I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH

  3. #3
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > OK. This still confuses me. I'm hoping some of the USA folks can
    > 'enlighten' me.
    >
    > In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread, scones,
    > between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from fruit (and sometimes
    > veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky' i.e. it sometimes contains nice
    > bits of fruit and sometimes it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).
    >
    > 'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains a bunch of
    > sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring that you mix with
    > (boiling) water which you allow to cool and then refrigerate until it
    > 'sets'. It is often served with custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered
    > that this what is known as 'jello' in the USA.

    The first time I worked with Brits and Ozzies I was confused by their
    terminology for what Americans call jello. Jello is actually a brand
    name that has become the generic for a gelatin dessert over the years.
    >
    > So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    as a clear condiment.
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >

    Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    called butters here in the USA. I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH

  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:BaP3k.285> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes
    call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    > ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    Jam has the whole fruit in it and jelly is made from the extracted juice.
    It usually filters from a sack of cloth so as to leave behind all solids
    that could make it less than jewel clear.

    Apple butter spreads like butter. It is a very old product, so I imagine
    that it filled in for butter in hard times, but I don't know that.



  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:BaP3k.285> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes
    call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    > ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    Jam has the whole fruit in it and jelly is made from the extracted juice.
    It usually filters from a sack of cloth so as to leave behind all solids
    that could make it less than jewel clear.

    Apple butter spreads like butter. It is a very old product, so I imagine
    that it filled in for butter in hard times, but I don't know that.



  6. #6
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 07:18:01 -0500, George Shirley wrote:

    > ChattyCathy wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    > Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    > as a clear condiment.
    >>
    >> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >>

    > Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    > called butters here in the USA.


    Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    <grin>

    > I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    > butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    > first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH


    Thanks, George.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  7. #7
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 07:18:01 -0500, George Shirley wrote:

    > ChattyCathy wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    > Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    > as a clear condiment.
    >>
    >> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >>

    > Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    > called butters here in the USA.


    Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    <grin>

    > I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    > butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    > first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH


    Thanks, George.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  8. #8
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 14:18:35 +0200, Giusi wrote:

    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:BaP3k.285> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes
    > call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >>
    >> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    >> ;-)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Chatty Cathy

    >
    > Jam has the whole fruit in it and jelly is made from the extracted juice.
    > It usually filters from a sack of cloth so as to leave behind all solids
    > that could make it less than jewel clear.


    Ah. I see.
    >
    > Apple butter spreads like butter. It is a very old product, so I imagine
    > that it filled in for butter in hard times, but I don't know that.


    You could be right. Thanks.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  9. #9
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 14:18:35 +0200, Giusi wrote:

    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:BaP3k.285> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes
    > call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >>
    >> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    >> ;-)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Chatty Cathy

    >
    > Jam has the whole fruit in it and jelly is made from the extracted juice.
    > It usually filters from a sack of cloth so as to leave behind all solids
    > that could make it less than jewel clear.


    Ah. I see.
    >
    > Apple butter spreads like butter. It is a very old product, so I imagine
    > that it filled in for butter in hard times, but I don't know that.


    You could be right. Thanks.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  10. #10
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    > <grin>


    Fruit cheese is not cheese and lemon curd isn't curd. Life is like that.
    Full of lies, deception and disappointment.



  11. #11
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    > <grin>


    Fruit cheese is not cheese and lemon curd isn't curd. Life is like that.
    Full of lies, deception and disappointment.



  12. #12
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 14:38:53 +0200, Giusi wrote:

    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    >> <grin>

    >
    > Fruit cheese is not cheese and lemon curd isn't curd. Life is like
    > that. Full of lies, deception and disappointment.


    Heh. I usually feel like that on Mondays - but it's Wednesday, so I'm
    feeling a bit more optimistic today ;-)

    BTW, IIRC you reside in Italy? Been lucky enough to get some dried pasta
    imported from that country lately. So much better that the pasta they make
    locally. In fact, I am gonna make some spaghetti with meat sauce tonight,
    it's an old favorite.

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  13. #13
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 14:38:53 +0200, Giusi wrote:

    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    >> <grin>

    >
    > Fruit cheese is not cheese and lemon curd isn't curd. Life is like
    > that. Full of lies, deception and disappointment.


    Heh. I usually feel like that on Mondays - but it's Wednesday, so I'm
    feeling a bit more optimistic today ;-)

    BTW, IIRC you reside in Italy? Been lucky enough to get some dried pasta
    imported from that country lately. So much better that the pasta they make
    locally. In fact, I am gonna make some spaghetti with meat sauce tonight,
    it's an old favorite.

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  14. #14
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BaP3k.285$[email protected]..
    > OK. This still confuses me. I'm hoping some of the USA folks can
    > 'enlighten' me.
    >
    > In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread, scones,
    > between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from fruit (and sometimes
    > veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky' i.e. it sometimes contains nice
    > bits of fruit and sometimes it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).
    >
    > 'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains a bunch of
    > sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring that you mix with
    > (boiling) water which you allow to cool and then refrigerate until it
    > 'sets'. It is often served with custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered
    > that this what is known as 'jello' in the USA.
    >
    > So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    > ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy
    >
    > Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...



    You have to look at all 3 to be technically correct.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)



    From epicurious:

    jam
    A thick mixture of fruit, sugar (and sometimes PECTIN) that is cooked until
    the pieces of fruit are very soft and almost formless. It is used as a bread
    spread, a filling for pastries and cookies and an ingredient for various
    desserts. See also JELLY; PRESERVES.


    jelly
    1. A clear, bright mixture made from fruit juice, sugar and sometimes
    PECTIN. The texture is tender but will be firm enough to hold its shape when
    turned out of its container. Jelly is used as a bread spread and as a
    filling for some cakes and cookies. 2. In Britain, jelly is the term used
    for gelatin dessert. See also JAM; PRESERVES.

    preserves
    Fruit cooked with sugar and usually PECTIN, used as a spread for bread.
    Preserves differ from JAM in that the chunks of fruit are medium to large
    rather than the texture of thick puree. See also JELLY.


  15. #15
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BaP3k.285$[email protected]..
    > OK. This still confuses me. I'm hoping some of the USA folks can
    > 'enlighten' me.
    >
    > In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread, scones,
    > between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from fruit (and sometimes
    > veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky' i.e. it sometimes contains nice
    > bits of fruit and sometimes it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).
    >
    > 'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains a bunch of
    > sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring that you mix with
    > (boiling) water which you allow to cool and then refrigerate until it
    > 'sets'. It is often served with custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered
    > that this what is known as 'jello' in the USA.
    >
    > So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    > and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?
    >
    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO
    > ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy
    >
    > Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...



    You have to look at all 3 to be technically correct.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)



    From epicurious:

    jam
    A thick mixture of fruit, sugar (and sometimes PECTIN) that is cooked until
    the pieces of fruit are very soft and almost formless. It is used as a bread
    spread, a filling for pastries and cookies and an ingredient for various
    desserts. See also JELLY; PRESERVES.


    jelly
    1. A clear, bright mixture made from fruit juice, sugar and sometimes
    PECTIN. The texture is tender but will be firm enough to hold its shape when
    turned out of its container. Jelly is used as a bread spread and as a
    filling for some cakes and cookies. 2. In Britain, jelly is the term used
    for gelatin dessert. See also JAM; PRESERVES.

    preserves
    Fruit cooked with sugar and usually PECTIN, used as a spread for bread.
    Preserves differ from JAM in that the chunks of fruit are medium to large
    rather than the texture of thick puree. See also JELLY.


  16. #16
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 06:13:50 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?


    >
    >
    > You have to look at all 3 to be technically correct.


    I see what you mean...

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  17. #17
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 06:13:50 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?


    >
    >
    > You have to look at all 3 to be technically correct.


    I see what you mean...

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


  18. #18
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 07:18:01 -0500, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >> ChattyCathy wrote:
    >>
    >>> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >>> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    >> Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    >> as a clear condiment.
    >>> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >>>

    >> Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    >> called butters here in the USA.

    >
    > Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    > <grin>
    >
    >> I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    >> butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    >> first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH

    >
    > Thanks, George.

    You're welcome. Some of my ancestry is Pom but I have respect for my
    convict cousins. <BSEG>

  19. #19
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    ChattyCathy wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 07:18:01 -0500, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >> ChattyCathy wrote:
    >>
    >>> So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call it jam
    >>> and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?

    >> Jam is chunky with fruit or veggies whereas jelly is generally accepted
    >> as a clear condiment.
    >>> Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery' about it IMHO ;-)
    >>>

    >> Because it isn't jelly, nor jam. Pureed fruit spreads are generally
    >> called butters here in the USA.

    >
    > Yabut, it isn't 'butter' either. To me, butter is made from milk fat...
    > <grin>
    >
    >> I make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon
    >> butters and I also make apple, pear, peach, and persimmon jams. The
    >> first is finely pureed and the second has chunks of fruit in it. HTH

    >
    > Thanks, George.

    You're welcome. Some of my ancestry is Pom but I have respect for my
    convict cousins. <BSEG>

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Jam, jelly and jello

    ChattyCathy wrote on Wed, 11 Jun 2008 14:04:39 +0200:

    > In this part of the world 'jam' is what you spread on bread,
    > scones, between layers of cake etc. and is usually made from
    > fruit (and sometimes veggies). It can be smooth or 'chunky'
    > i.e. it sometimes contains nice bits of fruit and sometimes
    > it's 'pureed' (for want of a better word).


    > 'Jelly' is the stuff we usually get in a packet that contains
    > a bunch of sugar/sweetener, gelatin, and artificial flavoring
    > that you mix with (boiling) water which you allow to cool and
    > then refrigerate until it 'sets'. It is often served with
    > custard as a 'dessert'. I have gathered that this what is
    > known as 'jello' in the USA.


    > So my question is this: Why do folks from the USA sometimes call
    > it jam and sometimes jelly? What's the distinction?


    > Oh, and why is 'apple butter' named that? Nothing 'buttery'
    > about it IMHO ;-)


    What follows is IMHO! "Jam", as a spread containing fruit, is known but
    not used very frequently in my part of the world. It's a bit ambiguous
    since "preserve" should cover all such things but often means "jam".
    "Jelly" is used when the solids have been strained out and should
    actually be a gel, ie., not fluid. "Jello", once a tradename, is a clear
    fruit-flavored dessert using gelatin or sometimes things like agar to
    achieve the result. Fruit butters contain rather more of the original
    fruit than jam. Apple butter is something like thick apple sauce.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


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