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Thread: It's spargel season, bring the rice

  1. #1
    ViLco Guest

    Default It's spargel season, bring the rice

    300 grams of asparagi
    half a wine glass of arborio rice (2 servings)
    25 grams of butter
    EVO oil
    1 scallion
    1/4 glass of white wine
    vegetable broth (I used celery onion tomato carrot)
    grated aged cheese

    Put the asparagi in a tall and narrow pot and fill with enough water to
    leave the tips out of it, let the water gently boil for 5-6 minutes. Remove
    from water and chop the stems in 0.5 cm pieces, let the tips whole, then put
    some EVO oil in a skillet, when the scallion browns a little add the
    asparagi and let this all cook together for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, in a
    pot, start the risotto by melting the butter and adding the rice. Add the
    wine, let it evaporate and start the usual process: add few vegetable broth,
    let it cook, stir the minimum needed to prevent the rice from sticking to
    the pot.
    When the rice is at 2 minutes from doneness, add the content of the asparagi
    skillet, add the cheese, stir them in and let it go until done, then give it
    another quick stir and serve.
    Next time it will be butter only, also in the asparagi skillet.




  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On May 17, 12:08*am, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > 300 grams of asparagi
    > half a wine glass of arborio rice (2 servings)
    > 25 grams of butter
    > EVO oil
    > 1 scallion
    > 1/4 glass of white wine
    > vegetable broth (I used celery onion tomato carrot)
    > grated aged cheese
    >
    > Put the asparagi in a tall and narrow pot and fill with enough water to
    > leave the tips out of it, let the water gently boil for 5-6 minutes.


    > Next time it will be butter only, also in the asparagi skillet.


    After boiling/steaming, grandma used to just put them in a long bowl
    and cover with buttered breadcrumbs (melt butter, saute breadcrumbs,
    add salt/pepper, strew over the cooked spargeln in the bowl.)

    Of course, for this she always used the thicker, succulent asparagus,
    not the pencil size.

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    ViLco wrote:

    > 300 grams of asparagi
    > half a wine glass of arborio rice (2 servings)
    > 25 grams of butter
    > EVO oil
    > 1 scallion
    > 1/4 glass of white wine
    > vegetable broth (I used celery onion tomato carrot)
    > grated aged cheese
    >
    > Put the asparagi in a tall and narrow pot and fill with enough water to
    > leave the tips out of it, let the water gently boil for 5-6 minutes. Remove
    > from water and chop the stems in 0.5 cm pieces, let the tips whole, then put
    > some EVO oil in a skillet, when the scallion browns a little add the
    > asparagi and let this all cook together for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, in a
    > pot, start the risotto by melting the butter and adding the rice. Add the
    > wine, let it evaporate and start the usual process: add few vegetable broth,
    > let it cook, stir the minimum needed to prevent the rice from sticking to
    > the pot.
    > When the rice is at 2 minutes from doneness, add the content of the asparagi
    > skillet, add the cheese, stir them in and let it go until done, then give it
    > another quick stir and serve.
    > Next time it will be butter only, also in the asparagi skillet.


    Tonight I will be making an appetizer of nachos with (par-cooked)
    asparagus and olives. I don't think I've ever seen such a thing before,
    but there's no reason asparagus shouldn't go with olives, tortilla
    chips, and cheese.

    Bob

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 00:58:57 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> 300 grams of asparagi
    >> half a wine glass of arborio rice (2 servings)
    >> 25 grams of butter
    >> EVO oil
    >> 1 scallion
    >> 1/4 glass of white wine
    >> vegetable broth (I used celery onion tomato carrot)
    >> grated aged cheese
    >>
    >> Put the asparagi in a tall and narrow pot and fill with enough water to
    >> leave the tips out of it, let the water gently boil for 5-6 minutes. Remove
    >> from water and chop the stems in 0.5 cm pieces, let the tips whole, then put
    >> some EVO oil in a skillet, when the scallion browns a little add the
    >> asparagi and let this all cook together for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, in a
    >> pot, start the risotto by melting the butter and adding the rice. Add the
    >> wine, let it evaporate and start the usual process: add few vegetable broth,
    >> let it cook, stir the minimum needed to prevent the rice from sticking to
    >> the pot.
    >> When the rice is at 2 minutes from doneness, add the content of the asparagi
    >> skillet, add the cheese, stir them in and let it go until done, then give it
    >> another quick stir and serve.
    >> Next time it will be butter only, also in the asparagi skillet.

    >
    > Tonight I will be making an appetizer of nachos with (par-cooked)
    > asparagus and olives. I don't think I've ever seen such a thing before,
    > but there's no reason asparagus shouldn't go with olives, tortilla
    > chips, and cheese.


    Lemme guess.... Italian Nachos?

    Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    -sw

  5. #5
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:

    > Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    > Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.


    In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used: green
    pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a greenhouse.
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone
    Shguazza, pesce fess'

  6. #6
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Il 17/05/2012 18:43, ViLco ha scritto:

    > pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a greenhouse.


    remove that "probable", with the weather we had they *must* be growm in
    a greenhouse
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone
    Anche un maiale puo' arrampicarsi su un albero quando e' adulato

  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On 17/05/2012 12:43 PM, ViLco wrote:
    > Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:
    >
    >> Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    >> Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    >
    > In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    > Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    > varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used: green
    > pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a greenhouse.



    When I was in Europe during Spargel season I was under the impression
    that most of it was from Spain. I had green and white and they were all
    big thick stalks. I prefer them to the skinny stalks.

    FWIW... while I was out bicycling this morning I picked up a small
    bunch of fresh local asparagus.


  8. #8
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 00:58:57 -0700, Bob Terwilliger
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> 300 grams of asparagi
    >> half a wine glass of arborio rice (2 servings)
    >> 25 grams of butter
    >> EVO oil
    >> 1 scallion
    >> 1/4 glass of white wine
    >> vegetable broth (I used celery onion tomato carrot)
    >> grated aged cheese
    >>
    >> Put the asparagi in a tall and narrow pot and fill with enough water to
    >> leave the tips out of it, let the water gently boil for 5-6 minutes. Remove
    >> from water and chop the stems in 0.5 cm pieces, let the tips whole, then put
    >> some EVO oil in a skillet, when the scallion browns a little add the
    >> asparagi and let this all cook together for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, in a
    >> pot, start the risotto by melting the butter and adding the rice. Add the
    >> wine, let it evaporate and start the usual process: add few vegetable broth,
    >> let it cook, stir the minimum needed to prevent the rice from sticking to
    >> the pot.
    >> When the rice is at 2 minutes from doneness, add the content of the asparagi
    >> skillet, add the cheese, stir them in and let it go until done, then give it
    >> another quick stir and serve.
    >> Next time it will be butter only, also in the asparagi skillet.

    >
    >Tonight I will be making an appetizer of nachos with (par-cooked)
    >asparagus and olives. I don't think I've ever seen such a thing before,
    >but there's no reason asparagus shouldn't go with olives, tortilla
    >chips, and cheese.


    Asparagus would go well if made into guacamole, otherwise asparagus
    and nachos is just plain wrong, flavor wise and texture wise, even
    difficult to eat... asparagus sections would just roll about... making
    you eat like a dyslexic Mexican.
    http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Asparagus-Guacamole

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 17/05/2012 12:43 PM, ViLco wrote:
    >> Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:
    >>
    >>> Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    >>> Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    >>
    >> In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    >> Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    >> varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used:
    >> green pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a
    >> greenhouse.

    >
    >
    > When I was in Europe during Spargel season I was under the impression
    > that most of it was from Spain. I had green and white and they were
    > all big thick stalks. I prefer them to the skinny stalks.
    >


    That's the second reference in this thread to thick asparagus stalks. I
    don't get it. The thick stalks are tough and woody and must be trimmed down
    severely. The thin ones are nice and tender by comparison.

    MartyB



  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >> Tonight I will be making an appetizer of nachos with (par-cooked)
    >> asparagus and olives. I don't think I've ever seen such a thing before,
    >> but there's no reason asparagus shouldn't go with olives, tortilla
    >> chips, and cheese.

    >
    > Lemme guess.... Italian Nachos?


    More like California nachos. There's nothing particularly Italian about it.

    Bob

  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz blathered:

    > Asparagus would go well if made into guacamole, otherwise asparagus
    > and nachos is just plain wrong, flavor wise and texture wise,


    You're wrong and stupid.


    > even difficult to eat... asparagus sections would just roll about...
    > making you eat like a dyslexic Mexican.


    That might be a concern if I had Parkinson's Disease or brachial palsy,
    but since I do not, I'll be able to eat them with no problem at all.

    Bob

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    > Asparagus would go well if made into guacamole,

    Impossible.

    > http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Asparagus-Guacamole


    Yeesh. No wonder the author's family loves it. They probably hate avocados.



  13. #13
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On May 17, 11:38*am, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > > On 17/05/2012 12:43 PM, ViLco wrote:
    > >> Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:

    >
    > >>> Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    > >>> Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    >
    > >> In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    > >> Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    > >> varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used:
    > >> green pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a
    > >> greenhouse.

    >
    > > When I was in Europe during Spargel season I was under the impression
    > > that most of it was from Spain. I had green and white and they were
    > > all big thick stalks. I prefer them to the skinny stalks.

    >
    > That's the second reference in this thread to thick asparagus stalks. I
    > don't get it. The thick stalks are tough and woody and must be trimmed down
    > severely. The thin ones are nice and tender by comparison.
    >


    Asparagus stalks are thick and not woody if

    1. They're the first shoots of the year
    2. They come from older plants
    3. They come from male plants.

    http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/asparagus.cfm

    Male plants produce thicker, larger spears because they put no energy
    into seeds and have no weedy seedling problem. A line that produces
    only male plants was discovered and has been incorporated into some
    truly amazing varieties.

    Pencil thin or thick stems can be equally delicious. Contrary to
    popular belief, thinner stems are not an indication of tenderness.
    Thick stems are already thick when they poke their heads out of the
    soil and thin stems do not get thicker with age. Tenderness is related
    to maturity and freshness.


  14. #14
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 13:16:22 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On May 17, 11:38*am, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    >september.invalid> wrote:
    >> Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >> > On 17/05/2012 12:43 PM, ViLco wrote:
    >> >> Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:

    >>
    >> >>> Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    >> >>> Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    >>
    >> >> In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    >> >> Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    >> >> varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used:
    >> >> green pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a
    >> >> greenhouse.

    >>
    >> > When I was in Europe during Spargel season I was under the impression
    >> > that most of it was from Spain. I had green and white and they were
    >> > all big thick stalks. I prefer them to the skinny stalks.

    >>
    >> That's the second reference in this thread to thick asparagus stalks. I
    >> don't get it. The thick stalks are tough and woody and must be trimmed down
    >> severely. The thin ones are nice and tender by comparison.
    >>

    >
    >Asparagus stalks are thick and not woody if
    >
    >1. They're the first shoots of the year
    >2. They come from older plants
    >3. They come from male plants.
    >
    >http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/asparagus.cfm
    >
    >Male plants produce thicker, larger spears because they put no energy
    >into seeds and have no weedy seedling problem. A line that produces
    >only male plants was discovered and has been incorporated into some
    >truly amazing varieties.
    >
    >Pencil thin or thick stems can be equally delicious. Contrary to
    >popular belief, thinner stems are not an indication of tenderness.
    >Thick stems are already thick when they poke their heads out of the
    >soil and thin stems do not get thicker with age. Tenderness is related
    >to maturity and freshness.


    My complaint regarding thin asparagus is that typically they are cut
    much closer to the ground when harvested (the rip off plan starts way
    early, in the field) and since asparagus are sold by weight it's been
    my experience that more than half the thin asparagus I purchase (by
    weight) are inedible. With the thick asparagus only about 1/4 (by
    weight) is inedible. Taste wise I find no difference, it's just a
    matter of economics. Sometimes I get really annoyed at how asparagus
    are presented (cut way too low) so I break off the tough ends and
    leave them (I don't steal them) before heading to the check out
    scale... they tried to rip me off and I prevented their criminal act
    from succeeding, they tried to outsmart me but I outsmarted them.
    Years ago the mom n' pop green grocers would trim asparagus before
    weighing... they'd even insist cutomers taste produce before buying
    because they wanted you to come back, they appreciated your
    business... nowadays stores couldn't care less, the customer is just a
    POS to be used and abused. How asparagus are sold is a scam; if with
    the thin ones the produce department trimmed them properly no one
    would buy any because they would look like practically nothing, a
    handful of pencils whittled down to nubs, so instead they don't trim
    and sell half trash, that's definitely a scam. Stupid foodtv shows
    actually rationalize and promote the scam by instructing folks how to
    trim away the trash they paid for by snapping off the ends, and making
    them feel good about it by telling them to use the tough inedible ends
    to make stock, which of course hardly anyone does because WTF likes
    asparagus stock. I follow the foodtv advice but leave the tough ends
    for the store to make stock or shove them up their ass! LOL-LOL

  15. #15
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 13:38:20 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    -snip-
    >
    >That's the second reference in this thread to thick asparagus stalks. I
    >don't get it. The thick stalks are tough and woody and must be trimmed down
    >severely. The thin ones are nice and tender by comparison.


    Not in my garden. My thick ones are over an inch in diameter and
    if I cut them before they are 8" tall or so, they are as tender at the
    base as the tip.

    Most of the skinny ones in my garden are new plants that shoot up a
    foot overnight. The top 2-3 inches are tender, but the base is tough
    as leather.

    Jim

  16. #16
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 14:06:44 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Asparagus would go well if made into guacamole,

    >
    >Impossible.
    >
    >> http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Asparagus-Guacamole

    >
    >Yeesh. No wonder the author's family loves it. They probably hate avocados.
    >


    I hate avocadoes, but I wouldn't ruin good asparagus.

    Jim

  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 18:43:00 +0200, ViLco wrote:

    > Il 17/05/2012 17:47, Sqwertz ha scritto:
    >
    >> Note that Vilco is probably referring to white asparagus. Only
    >> Westerners eat that yucky green stuff.

    >
    > In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    > Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    > varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used: green
    > pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a greenhouse.


    OK, Good. Italy = Green. I really don't see what's the big deal
    about the whites. They don't even make your pee stink.

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 18:44:03 +0200, ViLco wrote:

    > Il 17/05/2012 18:43, ViLco ha scritto:
    >
    >> pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a greenhouse.

    >
    > remove that "probable", with the weather we had they *must* be growm in
    > a greenhouse


    Or in South America. That's where most of our non-seasonal asparagus
    comes from. And pretty darn cheap, too (as low as $1/lb last month,
    $1.49 this month).

    -sw

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    On Thu, 17 May 2012 11:48:29 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >>> Tonight I will be making an appetizer of nachos with (par-cooked)
    >>> asparagus and olives. I don't think I've ever seen such a thing before,
    >>> but there's no reason asparagus shouldn't go with olives, tortilla
    >>> chips, and cheese.

    >>
    >> Lemme guess.... Italian Nachos?

    >
    > More like California nachos. There's nothing particularly Italian about it.


    These are a hell of a lot more "Italian" than the "Italian Nachos" in
    the previous "Italian Nachos" thread! :-)

    -sw

    -sw

  20. #20
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: It's spargel season, bring the rice

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >> In my area, Emilia, white asparagus is less common than in areas like
    >> Bologna and southern Veneto, where they also grow many premium white
    >> varietes. Here asparagi are almost all green, as the ones I used:
    >> green pencil sized asparagi from Modena county, probably grown in a
    >> greenhouse.


    > OK, Good. Italy = Green. I really don't see what's the big deal
    > about the whites. They don't even make your pee stink.


    Not always, look better: Bologna and southern Veneto areas are full of white
    asparagi. Bassano del grappa, Vicenza and Cimadolmo are very renowned for
    their local whites. Cimadolmo obtained the european IGP labeling for its
    asparagi, while Bassano del grappa obtained the top labeling, the DOP.
    Badoere has a name for both white and green asparagi and both have obtained
    the IGP labeling.
    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asparag...ano_del_Grappa
    http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/ne...dolmo-Igp.html

    Every place has its way to grow white asparagi: some cover them with
    blankets, some plant them intentionally too deep so that the edible part
    grows covered by the soil, the goal is to keep a good part of the asparagus
    covered so the sunlight doesn't activate the photosynthesis.




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