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Thread: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession

  1. #1
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession

    Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession
    Tom Kington
    The Guardian

    Leftovers and offal -- from stale bread to pig's lung -- return to the
    dinner table as traditional recipes are rediscovered

    Italians facing a long, hard winter with less cash to spend in the
    supermarket owing to the economic crisis are being encouraged to
    rediscover the cheap, traditional recipes of their ancestors.

    Soups made with old bread and even pig's lungs are unlikely to appear on
    the menu of Michelin-starred Italian restaurants in London, New York or
    even Rome, but they are being touted as the nation's real cooking, made
    at a fraction of the price of many modern dishes.

    "Old recipes are a richness that Italy boasts, that were perfected
    during periods of poverty and are a way to come through the crisis
    eating well," said Carlo Petrini, the head of the slow food movement,
    which campaigns for traditional, sustainable foods.

    Petrini said the secret of Italy's low cost, old-style cuisine was the
    use of leftovers, from Tuscany's ribollita vegetable soup, made with
    stale bread, to le virtù -- the virtues -- a soup made in the town of
    Teramo with every winter vegetable left in the cupboard.

    "Nothing got wasted and the name of the soup is no coincidence. Young
    women once had to know how to make it before they got married," said
    Petrini. "Today food is a commodity. It needs its value back and to
    achieve that you cannot throw it away. Thanks to the crisis the young
    are rediscovering this and luckily their parents and grandparents are
    still around to teach them."

    In a roundup of nearly forgotten dishes, La Repubblica listed sbira
    soup, a Genoese speciality made with tripe, mushrooms, lard, bread, pine
    nuts and meat sauce that was favoured by policemen and prison guards and
    served as the traditional last meal to prisoners sentenced to death.

    Any talk of cutting out waste in Italian cooking inevitably revolves
    around making better use of the lesser known parts of animals including
    offal, which was a peasant staple for centuries, notably in Rome where
    prime cuts were reserved for the rich, leaving tripe as the city's
    signature dish.

    Arneo Nizzoli, 76, who runs a renowned restaurant in northern Italy near
    Mantua, said busloads of cookery students were now showing up to eat his
    maialata meals, where he uses as much of the pig as possible, from pig's
    lung soup to cotechino -- a type of sausage -- made with tongue, to
    pig's lard set with garlic, parsley and onion and spread over browned
    slices of polenta.

    "In this cold weather the TV is telling people to eat vegetables and
    fruit to resist. What is that about? What about lard?" he said.

    Pig's noses, cheek and feet, which all find use in Nizzoli's kitchen,
    cost half a euro a kilo, compared with over EUR 20 for cured pig's ham
    or prosciutto.

    "Sometimes I feel like a culinary archaeologist, but doing it my way
    means spending less and raising fewer pigs," he said. "These dishes take
    hours to cook, but if people are out of work they may have that time."

    Nizzoli said children raised on plain plates of pasta with parmesan
    cheese were agog at his meals, particularly his risotto made with
    salami, although his son Dario admitted that sometimes diners were told
    they had eaten lung soup only after they had finished.

    Horsemeat was once fed to children as a key source of iron by Italian
    mothers but young customers were now reluctant to try his horse stew,
    which is slow cooked for hours, said Nizzoli. "Horses were traditionally
    eaten here when they died but kids today just aren't interested," he
    said.

    Recipes from Il Ristorante Nizzoli

    Horse stew

    Three kg horse shoulder, two carrots, two onions, two celery stalks,
    four garlic segments, two spoonfuls of tomato paste, red wine, salt and
    pepper.

    Bind the meat with string or a roasting net, roll it in white flour and
    seal in oil until it browns. Finely chop and saute the vegetables in a
    separate pan, then add the meat, red wine, salt and pepper and cook for
    about three hours, adding water or stock when the liquid reduces. Blend
    the liquid and the vegetables, serve with the sliced meat and polenta or
    potato puree.

    Lung soup

    One pig's lung, a complete celery, one onion, grated Grana cheese,
    butter, oil, salt, pepper, 'Grattoni' type small pasta.

    Saute the onion with oil and butter, add the celery cut in large pieces
    with water, salt and pepper and some stock if wanted. Cook for half an
    hour. Separately wash then boil the lung in slightly salted water, mince
    when cooked and add to the vegetables. Add the pasta, cook and serve
    with a touch of grated cheese.

  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession


    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1kfmul9.ytknogb9el1cN%[email protected]..
    > Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession
    > Tom Kington
    > The Guardian
    >
    > Leftovers and offal -- from stale bread to pig's lung -- return to the
    > dinner table as traditional recipes are rediscovered
    >
    > Italians facing a long, hard winter with less cash to spend in the
    > supermarket owing to the economic crisis are being encouraged to
    > rediscover the cheap, traditional recipes of their ancestors.
    >
    > Soups made with old bread and even pig's lungs are unlikely to appear on
    > the menu of Michelin-starred Italian restaurants in London, New York or
    > even Rome, but they are being touted as the nation's real cooking, made
    > at a fraction of the price of many modern dishes.
    >
    > "Old recipes are a richness that Italy boasts, that were perfected
    > during periods of poverty and are a way to come through the crisis
    > eating well," said Carlo Petrini, the head of the slow food movement,
    > which campaigns for traditional, sustainable foods.
    >
    > Petrini said the secret of Italy's low cost, old-style cuisine was the
    > use of leftovers, from Tuscany's ribollita vegetable soup, made with
    > stale bread, to le virtù -- the virtues -- a soup made in the town of
    > Teramo with every winter vegetable left in the cupboard.
    >
    > "Nothing got wasted and the name of the soup is no coincidence. Young
    > women once had to know how to make it before they got married," said
    > Petrini. "Today food is a commodity. It needs its value back and to
    > achieve that you cannot throw it away. Thanks to the crisis the young
    > are rediscovering this and luckily their parents and grandparents are
    > still around to teach them."
    >
    > In a roundup of nearly forgotten dishes, La Repubblica listed sbira
    > soup, a Genoese speciality made with tripe, mushrooms, lard, bread, pine
    > nuts and meat sauce that was favoured by policemen and prison guards and
    > served as the traditional last meal to prisoners sentenced to death.
    >
    > Any talk of cutting out waste in Italian cooking inevitably revolves
    > around making better use of the lesser known parts of animals including
    > offal, which was a peasant staple for centuries, notably in Rome where
    > prime cuts were reserved for the rich, leaving tripe as the city's
    > signature dish.
    >
    > Arneo Nizzoli, 76, who runs a renowned restaurant in northern Italy near
    > Mantua, said busloads of cookery students were now showing up to eat his
    > maialata meals, where he uses as much of the pig as possible, from pig's
    > lung soup to cotechino -- a type of sausage -- made with tongue, to
    > pig's lard set with garlic, parsley and onion and spread over browned
    > slices of polenta.
    >
    > "In this cold weather the TV is telling people to eat vegetables and
    > fruit to resist. What is that about? What about lard?" he said.
    >
    > Pig's noses, cheek and feet, which all find use in Nizzoli's kitchen,
    > cost half a euro a kilo, compared with over EUR 20 for cured pig's ham
    > or prosciutto.
    >
    > "Sometimes I feel like a culinary archaeologist, but doing it my way
    > means spending less and raising fewer pigs," he said. "These dishes take
    > hours to cook, but if people are out of work they may have that time."
    >
    > Nizzoli said children raised on plain plates of pasta with parmesan
    > cheese were agog at his meals, particularly his risotto made with
    > salami, although his son Dario admitted that sometimes diners were told
    > they had eaten lung soup only after they had finished.
    >
    > Horsemeat was once fed to children as a key source of iron by Italian
    > mothers but young customers were now reluctant to try his horse stew,
    > which is slow cooked for hours, said Nizzoli. "Horses were traditionally
    > eaten here when they died but kids today just aren't interested," he
    > said.
    >
    > Recipes from Il Ristorante Nizzoli
    >
    > Horse stew
    >
    > Three kg horse shoulder, two carrots, two onions, two celery stalks,
    > four garlic segments, two spoonfuls of tomato paste, red wine, salt and
    > pepper.
    >
    > Bind the meat with string or a roasting net, roll it in white flour and
    > seal in oil until it browns. Finely chop and saute the vegetables in a
    > separate pan, then add the meat, red wine, salt and pepper and cook for
    > about three hours, adding water or stock when the liquid reduces. Blend
    > the liquid and the vegetables, serve with the sliced meat and polenta or
    > potato puree.
    >
    > Lung soup
    >
    > One pig's lung, a complete celery, one onion, grated Grana cheese,
    > butter, oil, salt, pepper, 'Grattoni' type small pasta.
    >
    > Saute the onion with oil and butter, add the celery cut in large pieces
    > with water, salt and pepper and some stock if wanted. Cook for half an
    > hour. Separately wash then boil the lung in slightly salted water, mince
    > when cooked and add to the vegetables. Add the pasta, cook and serve
    > with a touch of grated cheese.


    My Italian inlaws often ate bread salad. Stale bread with some form of
    tomato product over it. Usually canned tomatoes with the juice, straight
    from the can.



  3. #3
    Jeßus Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession


  4. #4
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession


    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1kfmul9.ytknogb9el1cN%[email protected]..
    > Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession
    > Tom Kington
    > The Guardian
    >
    > Leftovers and offal -- from stale bread to pig's lung -- return to the
    > dinner table as traditional recipes are rediscovered



    RETURN to the dinner table? for some of us, this stuff never left. Too bad
    offal is so darn expensive these days, and bread soup "souppa de pan" was
    pretty common in my family. I remember eating a dish with lungs once, it
    was good. I think we got them on the sly some how; not sure what the meat
    inspectors think of that sort of thing.

    Trippa - you bet!



  5. #5
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession

    On Feb 17, 3:53*pm, "Pico Rico" <PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:
    > "Victor Sack" <azaze...@koroviev.de> wrote in message
    >
    > news:1kfmul9.ytknogb9el1cN%[email protected]..
    >
    > > * * * *Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession
    > > * * * * * * * * * * * *Tom Kington
    > > * * * * * * * * * * * *The Guardian

    >
    > > Leftovers and offal -- from stale bread to pig's lung -- return to the
    > > dinner table as traditional recipes are rediscovered

    >
    > RETURN to the dinner table? *for some of us, this stuff never left. *Too bad
    > offal is so darn expensive these days, and bread soup "souppa de pan" was
    > pretty common in my family. *I remember eating a dish with lungs once, it
    > was good. *I think we got them on the sly some how; not sure what the meat
    > inspectors think of that sort of thing.
    >
    > Trippa - you bet!


    I have to keep reminding myself that the Austrian poster here is
    Kuettner, not Sack. Organ meats never left the Viennese dinner table,
    either. Here's a recipe for stewed calves' lungs (and apparently
    heart), served with an MLB regulation size dumpling made from dinner
    rolls. My German is only so-so, but I think the recipe cautions the
    cook that the lungs inflate during cooking, so you have to keep
    stabbing them with a fork:

    http://www.wien-vienna.at/rezepte-kalbsbeuschel.php

  6. #6
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession


    > Arneo Nizzoli, 76, who runs a renowned restaurant in northern Italy near
    > Mantua, said busloads of cookery students were now showing up to eat his
    > maialata meals, where he uses as much of the pig as possible, from pig's
    > lung soup to cotechino -- a type of sausage -- made with tongue, to
    > pig's lard set with garlic, parsley and onion and spread over browned
    > slices of polenta.


    I have been to three maialate (plural of maialata) at hsis restaurant, I
    still have the t-shirt with the smioing pig somewhere at my parents'
    home. Good kitchen, familiar environment and pork over all. I once asked
    about his "pork liver with his net" (the net around the intestines or
    stomach, IIRC) and he was happy to explain, showing an uncommon passion
    for his job.

    > Horsemeat was once fed to children as a key source of iron by Italian
    > mothers but young customers were now reluctant to try his horse stew,
    > which is slow cooked for hours, said Nizzoli. "Horses were traditionally
    > eaten here when they died but kids today just aren't interested," he
    > said.


    And that's sad.

    > Recipes from Il Ristorante Nizzoli
    >
    > Horse stew


    I'm susprised he didn't give the recipe sor somarina stew, made from a
    young female donkey, it's very famous both in his restaurant and in the
    nearby Cavaler Saltini in Pomponesco (MN). They're 10 minutes by car
    from one another, and both have much to give. Saltini is famous for his
    "loadél", a kind of mildly greasy baked bread, it's a recipe which is
    disappearing and there's no recipe around the internet. All the results
    from googl epoint to Saltini or Nizzoli or generally about the area, the
    southern part of the province of Mantua, along the river Po.
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone
    Every burp of a table companion is a sign of gratitude for the cook

  7. #7
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession

    ViLco <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Arneo Nizzoli, 76, who runs a renowned restaurant in northern Italy near
    > > Mantua, said busloads of cookery students were now showing up to eat his
    > > maialata meals, where he uses as much of the pig as possible, from pig's
    > > lung soup to cotechino -- a type of sausage -- made with tongue, to
    > > pig's lard set with garlic, parsley and onion and spread over browned
    > > slices of polenta.

    >
    > I have been to three maialate (plural of maialata) at hsis restaurant, I
    > still have the t-shirt with the smioing pig somewhere at my parents'
    > home. Good kitchen, familiar environment and pork over all. I once asked
    > about his "pork liver with his net" (the net around the intestines or
    > stomach, IIRC) and he was happy to explain, showing an uncommon passion
    > for his job.


    If ever I am in those parts, I'll make sure to visit Nizzoli's
    restaurant. That "net" has a very similar name in German, "Netz"; it is
    "caul" in English and "crêpine" in French.

    > > Horsemeat was once fed to children as a key source of iron by Italian
    > > mothers but young customers were now reluctant to try his horse stew,
    > > which is slow cooked for hours, said Nizzoli. "Horses were traditionally
    > > eaten here when they died but kids today just aren't interested," he
    > > said.

    >
    > And that's sad.


    Horse meat is becoming rare in Germany, too. Still, traditional places
    still serve it, especially here in the Rhineland, where Sauerbraten is
    still often enough made with horse meat and is sometimes even sold
    canned. I can buy horse meat at a stall at the main Carlspatz market
    here in Düsseldorf.

    > > Recipes from Il Ristorante Nizzoli
    > >
    > > Horse stew

    >
    > I'm susprised he didn't give the recipe sor somarina stew, made from a
    > young female donkey, it's very famous both in his restaurant and in the
    > nearby Cavaler Saltini in Pomponesco (MN). They're 10 minutes by car
    > from one another, and both have much to give. Saltini is famous for his
    > "loadél", a kind of mildly greasy baked bread, it's a recipe which is
    > disappearing and there's no recipe around the internet. All the results
    > from googl epoint to Saltini or Nizzoli or generally about the area, the
    > southern part of the province of Mantua, along the river Po.


    For some reason, Nizzoli does not list any horse or donkey dishes on his
    current menu, either. A couple of donkey recipes are included in the
    Riccette di Osterie d'Italia (where they say that most donkey meat comes
    from Turkey or Albania nowadays) and in the Accademia Italiana della
    Cucina compilations. I posted a couple of donkey recipes over the
    years:

    <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/msg/9683d422d5c14390>
    <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/msg/82aee70087d7a612>

    Victor

  8. #8
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Italians turn back the clock to eat cheaply in recession

    Victor Sack wrote:

    >> over all. I once asked about his "pork liver with his net" (the net
    >> around the intestines or stomach, IIRC) and he was happy to explain,
    >> showing an uncommon passion for his job.


    > If ever I am in those parts, I'll make sure to visit Nizzoli's
    > restaurant. That "net" has a very similar name in German, "Netz"; it
    > is "caul" in English and "crêpine" in French.


    This side of the river Po that net gets wrapped around bits of liver and the
    dish is called "fegatini", Nizzoli instead puts it in the pan along with
    liver bits. The result is circa the same, but Nizzoli's touch gives the dish
    a zing.

    >> And that's sad.


    > Horse meat is becoming rare in Germany, too. Still, traditional
    > places still serve it, especially here in the Rhineland, where
    > Sauerbraten is still often enough made with horse meat and is
    > sometimes even sold canned. I can buy horse meat at a stall at the
    > main Carlspatz market here in Düsseldorf.


    The last two main areas of Italy where one can always find horsemeat are
    Emilia and southern Puglia. Here in Reggio as well as in Parma there are
    lots of "macelleria equina" shops and every supermarket selling meat, apart
    from the very small ones, will have some horsemeat, at least some of those
    trasnparent plastic boxes coming from a slaghterhouse. Luckily I didn't see
    a decrease in this sector, even new shopping malls have their horsemeat
    butcher. In Puglia one finds horsemeat stew even in the stalls sending
    sandwiches on the road: a couple of slices, some sauce and the sandwich is
    ready. I couldn't believe it when I saw it first

    > For some reason, Nizzoli does not list any horse or donkey dishes on
    > his current menu, either. A couple of donkey recipes are included in
    > the Riccette di Osterie d'Italia (where they say that most donkey
    > meat comes from Turkey or Albania nowadays) and in the Accademia
    > Italiana della Cucina compilations. I posted a couple of donkey
    > recipes over the years:
    >
    > <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/msg/9683d422d5c14390>
    > <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/msg/82aee70087d7a612>


    The first one is very similar to what they make in the agriturismo in
    Montebaducco, a donkey farm about 15km from here, one of the biggest in
    Europe. They breed circa 500 donkeys of many breeds there, also trying to
    save breeds who are at risk of extinction, and have a shop where they sell
    cold cuts from donkey, gooses and oysters, as well as milk and beauty
    products. Their agruiturismo restaurant serves these products and many
    dishes and the most renowned in the area, and my favorite one, is their
    stracotto di somarina. If "one of the biggest" donkey farms in Europe counts
    only 500 animals, I do understand why we have to import from foreign
    countries.
    Here's their website http://www.montebaducco.it/




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