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Thread: Inventing a dessert

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Inventing a dessert

    Our farmer's market carries a variety of Asian pear with which I'm
    unfamiliar. It's pear-shaped (not round like many other
    Asian pears), yellow without any "freckling" at all and firm like an Asian
    pear. It's got a taste slightly reminiscent of honey and isn't gritty at
    all.

    It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.

    Bob


  2. #2
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm
    > looking to dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a
    > puff-pastry shell with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and
    > honey-glazed pear slices.



    The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant sheets?
    Either might need some help in the sugar department, maybe paint the
    inside of sheets with egg yolk and sprinkle lightly with sugar. Fill
    with slices of the pear to fit. Wrap them up and on a couple, press some
    blanched almonds or pistachios into the outside pastry dough. Put the
    ginger sauce and cream on the side for spooning out for dipping.

    Or not.

    Andy

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 01:48:41 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    > dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    > with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.


    If you're looking for something completely different, I guess stuffed
    or poached pears would do the trick. Personally, I'd roast them and
    use them in a salad.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 06:13:19 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant sheets?


    Really? I didn't like that part at all. I'd make a pate sucrée
    instead of using puff pastry.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 06:13:19 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant
    >> sheets?

    >
    > Really? I didn't like that part at all. I'd make a pate sucrée
    > instead of using puff pastry.



    sf,

    Made me google that. It DOES sound like a better idea.

    Beest,

    Andy

  6. #6
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 01:48:41 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:


    Try a pear tart. Slice and arrange on a tart shell, then thicken up
    some plum juice by reduction and cornstarch, glaze the pears and allow
    to cool. Alternatively, a light glaze of thickened ruby port, with
    maybe a pinch of cinnamon or nutmeg.

    HTH

    Alex

  7. #7
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    Forgot: the pear slices need to be poached first. Sorry.

    Alex

  8. #8
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Nov 10, 9:54*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 06:13:19 -0600, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > > The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant sheets?

    >
    > Really? *I didn't like that part at all. *I'd make a pate sucr e
    > instead of using puff pastry.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Never trust a dog to watch your food.


    Me, too - a reg'lar tart shell. It sounds good. I wonder how "Pears
    Melba" would taste - add some raspberries...?

    N.

  9. #9
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Nov 10, 10:45*am, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 01:48:41 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    >
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    > Try a pear tart. Slice and arrange on a tart shell, then thicken up
    > some plum juice by reduction and cornstarch, glaze the pears and allow
    > to cool. Alternatively, a light glaze of thickened ruby port, with
    > maybe a pinch of cinnamon or nutmeg.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Alex


    Instead of messing with plum juice, one could use plum jelly or jam,
    heated, to glaze.

    N.

  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    >> dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    >> with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.

    >
    >If you're looking for something completely different, I guess stuffed
    >or poached pears would do the trick. Personally, I'd roast them and
    >use them in a salad.


    Only a keyboard kook is constantly guilding the lily. If unique, well
    ripened, and tastes good I'd not cook them at all (save cooking for
    ordinary/common varieties), arrange cored pear slices garnished with
    creme anglaise... or serve lightly drizzled with balsamico
    tradizionale. Any idiot without a pair can kook a pear... gots to
    show some class or may as well open a tin of Del Monte. Me, I'd serve
    the fruit whole in a bowl accompanied by a wheel of brie... the best
    beverage for accompanying pears (fruit) and cheese is Champagne.

  11. #11
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Nov 10, 1:48*am, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > Our farmer's market carries a variety of Asian pear with which I'm
    > unfamiliar. It's pear-shaped (not round like many other
    > Asian pears), yellow without any "freckling" at all and firm like an Asian
    > pear. It's got a taste slightly reminiscent of honey and isn't gritty at
    > all.
    >
    > It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    > dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    > with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.
    >
    > Bob


    Is it a Yali pear?

  12. #12
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 01:48:41 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> arranged random neurons and said:

    >Our farmer's market carries a variety of Asian pear with which I'm
    >unfamiliar. It's pear-shaped (not round like many other
    >Asian pears), yellow without any "freckling" at all and firm like an Asian
    >pear. It's got a taste slightly reminiscent of honey and isn't gritty at
    >all.
    >
    >It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    >dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    >with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.


    Bob, I've posted this before. It's very elegant looking and even
    tastes good

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Poached Pears In Phyllo With Chocolate Sauce

    desserts

    3 cups water
    1 cup fruity white wine
    1/4 cup sugar
    6 Comice or Bosc pears; cored and peeled,
    ; stems intact
    1 pound phyllo dough; thawed
    1/4 pound butter; melted
    chocolate syrup

    Preheat oven to 400F. In a medium saucepan, bring the water, wine and
    sugar
    to a boil. Carefully place pears upright in the water-wine-sugar
    mixture
    and boil gently, covered, for 10 mins. Remove from the liquid and set
    aside.

    Fold a sheet of phyllo to make a square. Brush with butter and add 2
    more
    layers of phyllo in the same shape and brush again with butter. Place
    a
    cooked pear in the center of the phyllo.

    Butter your hands and gather the phyllo up around the pear. The butter
    will
    act like glue and hold the phyllo together. Carefully place the pear
    packets on a cookie sheet, sides not touching, and continue with the
    remaining phyllo and pears.

    Bake for 20 mins, then set aside in the refrigerator until serving
    time.
    Just before serving, pour a pool of chocolate syrup slightly off
    center on
    each dessert plate and carefully place a pear in the center of each
    plate,
    overlapping the sauce.



    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Contributor: The Denver Post

    Yield: 1 serving

    Preparation Time: 0:00

    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000
    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000

    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.66 **



    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    Nancy wrote:

    >>> The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant sheets?

    >>
    >> Really? I didn't like that part at all. I'd make a pate sucr e instead
    >> of using puff pastry.

    >
    > Me, too - a reg'lar tart shell. It sounds good. I wonder how "Pears
    > Melba" would taste - add some raspberries...?


    Thing is, I'm already making a sweet-potato tart and a tarte Tatin. I think
    another tart would be overkill (even though the tarte Tatin isn't a "real"
    tart).

    Bob


  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    Merry wrote:

    > Is it a Yali pear?


    Yes! Thank you!

    Bob

  15. #15
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    Squeaks wrote:

    > Bob, I've posted this before. It's very elegant looking and even tastes
    > good
    >
    > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >
    > Poached Pears In Phyllo With Chocolate Sauce


    That looks like one of the recipes I considered last night, a Gascon pie
    listed in the _Pie and Pastry Bible_: It's made using a phyllo crust, and
    the top of the pie is "ruffled" phyllo. (I should have mentioned that I'm
    trying to fit this into my Thanksgiving dessert menu which already has a
    sweet-potato tart and a tarte Tatin.) This recipe looks good because it
    isn't round! I'd modify it by using honey instead of chocolate, because this
    pear variety seems to have such an affinity for honey. Thanks!

    Bob


  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 14:55:21 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Nancy wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Me, too - a reg'lar tart shell. It sounds good. I wonder how "Pears
    > > Melba" would taste - add some raspberries...?

    >
    > Thing is, I'm already making a sweet-potato tart and a tarte Tatin. I think
    > another tart would be overkill (even though the tarte Tatin isn't a "real"
    > tart).
    >


    What you described initially was very tart-like. Maybe you could make
    turnovers with that puff pastry. Here's an example.
    http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/b...turnovers.aspx

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  17. #17
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz blathered:

    > Only a keyboard kook is constantly guilding the lily. If unique, well
    > ripened, and tastes good I'd not cook them at all (save cooking for
    > ordinary/common varieties), arrange cored pear slices garnished with creme
    > anglaise... or serve lightly drizzled with balsamico tradizionale. Any
    > idiot without a pair can kook a pear... gots to show some class or may as
    > well open a tin of Del Monte. Me, I'd serve the fruit whole in a bowl
    > accompanied by a wheel of brie... the best beverage for accompanying pears
    > (fruit) and cheese is Champagne.


    Here's the thing: If *you* cooked it, you'd **** it up. Best thing for *you*
    to do would be to leave it as untouched by your filthy hands as possible.
    But I don't have the same limitations you do. The preparations you describe
    would be something I would have for lunch or a snack, not a dessert.

    Bob


  18. #18
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Nov 10, 6:13*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > > It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm
    > > looking to dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a
    > > puff-pastry shell with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and
    > > honey-glazed pear slices.

    >
    > The puff pastry sounds decent. Or the canned Pillsbury croissant sheets?


    That sounds more like Stu than Terwilliger. Maybe topped with non-
    dairy whipped topping.
    >
    > Andy


    --Bryan

  19. #19
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Inventing a dessert

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2010 01:48:41 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Our farmer's market carries a variety of Asian pear with which I'm
    >unfamiliar. It's pear-shaped (not round like many other
    >Asian pears), yellow without any "freckling" at all and firm like an Asian
    >pear. It's got a taste slightly reminiscent of honey and isn't gritty at
    >all.
    >
    >It would be great on its own with a glass of Sauternes, but I'm looking to
    >dress it up a bit. Any ideas? I'm currently considering a puff-pastry shell
    >with ginger pastry cream, toasted almonds, and honey-glazed pear slices.
    >
    >Bob


    Wow, I think that's a great idea I think I'll try it, I still have a
    couple of pears that need to be used soon.

    Perhaps you'd like to try the pear apricot tart I made the other day
    and_still_haven't posted to my blog. Hopefully I'll get it up
    tomorrow.

    Photo of finished tart.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625356825820/

    or
    http://tinyurl.com/279g47w

    Just to let you know, the crust is not real sweet but that's o.k. with
    me.
    I recommend cutting the apricots into 4ths, cutting them in half left
    them too big for my liking, also; next time I make it I will also cut
    the pears into 8ths.

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Pear and Apricot Tart

    desserts

    1/2 cup (1stick) unsalted butter; room temperature
    plus more for the pan
    1/2 cup raw almonds
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 large egg
    1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
    1 cup all purpose flour; spooned, leveled
    1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder
    1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    2 pears, such as Bosc or Bartlett; peeled, quartered, cored
    1/2 cup dried apricots; halved
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

    Heat oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-inch removable-bottom fluted tart pan.

    In a food processor, process the almonds and 1/2 cup of the sugar
    until finely ground. Add the butter, egg, and almond extract and
    process until smooth. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt and pulse
    a few times just to combine. (the dough will be soft)

    Spread the dough in the bottom of the prepared pan.

    In a small bowl, toss the pears and apricots with the lemon juice and
    the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Arrange the pears in the dough.
    Scatter the apricots over the dough, pressing them in gently.

    Bake until the pears are tender and the center is firm, 50 to 55
    minutes. Cover the edges with foil if they brown too quickly.

    In a small bowl, combine the preserves and 1 tablespoon water. Brush
    over the warm tart. Let cool in the pan before unmolding.

    Notes: November Real Simple Magazine


    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.84 **

    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 11/06/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


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