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Thread: Inspired by you folks...

  1. #1
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Inspired by you folks...

    ....I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap
    meat. I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I
    found a boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops
    for $1.49 a pound, so I bought some.

    The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    house does smell pretty good right now.

    I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    either corn or peas. What are you having?

    Serene
    --
    "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins

  2. #2
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 17:59:50 -0700, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    >sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    >fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    >house does smell pretty good right now.


    Thyme is also wonderful with pork....
    >
    >I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >either corn or peas. What are you having?


    I am fixing Zuni Stew, from the Greens Cookbook, by Deborah Madison.
    For some reason (at least to me) there is a hint of fall in the air
    here. And this stew has an autumny feel to me. It does have
    summer vegetables, like squash and corn, but it is nice and
    hearty...with beans a major ingredient in it.

    Not sure what else yet....

    Christine

  3. #3
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap
    >meat. I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I
    >found a boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops
    >for $1.49 a pound, so I bought some.
    >
    >The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    >sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    >fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    >house does smell pretty good right now.
    >
    >I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >either corn or peas. What are you having?


    I made a batch of a potato salad (no tofu in it this time), and
    while I am having cheese ravioli, K.P. will have a leftover
    brined/Weber'ed/freerange porkchop from a couple nights ago.
    Also there is some summer squash and basil.

    I've never cooked pork with sage -- that sounds intriguing.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Wed 03 Sep 2008 05:59:50p, Serene Vannoy told us...

    > ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap
    > meat. I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I
    > found a boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops
    > for $1.49 a pound, so I bought some.
    >
    > The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    > sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    > fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    > house does smell pretty good right now.
    >
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    > either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >
    > Serene


    That sounds delicious, Serene, and I love sage with pork. The meal you put
    together is a particular favorite of mine.

    Even if you're not terribly fond of sage, the next time you make spaghetti
    with meat sauce, try adding sage to it, along with your other herbs. It
    gives a je ne sais quoi to the flavor, but is really delicious. You would
    not notice it as a "sage" taste.

    For tonight, I have sauerkraut and raw German sausages in the oven in a
    covered baking dish that will cook at 325 for about 2-1/2 hours.
    Seasonings are onion, garlic, black pepper, paprika, and caraway seeds.
    I'll be serving it with mashed potatoes and sliced tomatoes.

    A local bake shop sells portion size cake squares of many types. I picked
    up two tiramisu cake squares for dessert. They're almost better than you
    can make at home.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 09(IX)/03(III)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 5dys 5hrs 51mins
    *******************************************
    What's blue and square? An orange in
    disguise...
    *******************************************

  5. #5
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...


    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap meat.
    > I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I found a
    > boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops for $1.49 a
    > pound, so I bought some.
    >
    > The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added sage
    > on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE fan of
    > sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the house does
    > smell pretty good right now.
    >
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and either
    > corn or peas. What are you having?


    Um...dinner at your house? :-D
    Actually, we had roast beef and melted swiss on garlic rolls, with aus jus
    for dipping, and fresh steamed green beans.



  6. #6
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    dejablues wrote:
    > "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap meat.
    >> I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I found a
    >> boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops for $1.49 a
    >> pound, so I bought some.
    >>
    >> The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added sage
    >> on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE fan of
    >> sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the house does
    >> smell pretty good right now.
    >>
    >> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and either
    >> corn or peas. What are you having?

    >
    > Um...dinner at your house? :-D


    Yay! Come on over. Dinner's in half an hour.

    > Actually, we had roast beef and melted swiss on garlic rolls, with aus jus
    > for dipping, and fresh steamed green beans.


    That sounds *lovely*.

    Mmmmmm, green beans. Love 'em.

    Serene

    --
    "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins

  7. #7
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord news:6i8q86FpjuhtU4
    @mid.individual.net:

    > ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap
    > meat. I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well,

    I
    > found a boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops
    > for $1.49 a pound, so I bought some.
    >
    > The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    > sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a

    HUGE
    > fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    > house does smell pretty good right now.
    >
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    > either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >
    > Serene


    I am also not a huge fan of sage, but it *does* go really well with
    pork. 'Pork fat rendering up with sage' is something they should make a
    potpourri to smell like, along with 'chicken soup simmering'. And
    'lasagna baking'.

    We had sweet Italian sausages with sauteed onion, green pepper, and
    mushroom. We had slightly too-ripe peaches for dessert. I also made
    raspberry jell-o that I sliced the rest of the peaches into, but that's
    for tomorrow

    I have an appointment after work tomorrow, so I'm cooking that bean
    thing I mentioned in another post right now, and I'll nuke some when we
    get home.

    --
    Saerah (wants some of that pickled red cabbage. maybe when it goes on
    sale I will put some up.)

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  8. #8
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 03 Sep 2008 05:59:50p, Serene Vannoy told us...
    >


    >> The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    >> sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    >> fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    >> house does smell pretty good right now.
    >>
    >> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >> either corn or peas. What are you having?


    > That sounds delicious, Serene, and I love sage with pork. The meal you put
    > together is a particular favorite of mine.


    It was really good, and the leftovers are getting slow-cooked with
    apples and the rest of the pickled cabbage tomorrow.

    > Even if you're not terribly fond of sage, the next time you make spaghetti
    > with meat sauce, try adding sage to it, along with your other herbs. It
    > gives a je ne sais quoi to the flavor, but is really delicious. You would
    > not notice it as a "sage" taste.


    It seems like that might give it a breakfast-sausage taste.

    >
    > For tonight, I have sauerkraut and raw German sausages in the oven in a
    > covered baking dish that will cook at 325 for about 2-1/2 hours.
    > Seasonings are onion, garlic, black pepper, paprika, and caraway seeds.
    > I'll be serving it with mashed potatoes and sliced tomatoes.


    Yum.

    >
    > A local bake shop sells portion size cake squares of many types. I picked
    > up two tiramisu cake squares for dessert. They're almost better than you
    > can make at home.


    You can have my share. Wet cake is not my thing.

    Serene

    --
    "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins

  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Wed 03 Sep 2008 07:29:16p, Serene Vannoy told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 03 Sep 2008 05:59:50p, Serene Vannoy told us...
    >>

    >
    >>> The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    >>> sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a
    >>> HUGE fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork,
    >>> and the house does smell pretty good right now.
    >>>
    >>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >>> either corn or peas. What are you having?

    >
    >> That sounds delicious, Serene, and I love sage with pork. The meal you
    >> put together is a particular favorite of mine.

    >
    > It was really good, and the leftovers are getting slow-cooked with
    > apples and the rest of the pickled cabbage tomorrow.


    That sounds really good, too!

    >> Even if you're not terribly fond of sage, the next time you make
    >> spaghetti with meat sauce, try adding sage to it, along with your other
    >> herbs. It gives a je ne sais quoi to the flavor, but is really
    >> delicious. You would not notice it as a "sage" taste.

    >
    > It seems like that might give it a breakfast-sausage taste.


    Trust me, it doesn't. I wouldn't like that either. I use a lot of
    different herbs in my meat sauce, usually oregano, marjoram, thyme,
    rosemary, sage, and parsley. It's a long cooking sauce, and by the time
    it's done, the flavors blend beautifully. Nothing dominates, but the
    overall taste is really good.

    >> For tonight, I have sauerkraut and raw German sausages in the oven in a
    >> covered baking dish that will cook at 325 for about 2-1/2 hours.
    >> Seasonings are onion, garlic, black pepper, paprika, and caraway seeds.
    >> I'll be serving it with mashed potatoes and sliced tomatoes.

    >
    > Yum.


    We haven't eaten yet, but it sure smells good!

    >> A local bake shop sells portion size cake squares of many types. I
    >> picked up two tiramisu cake squares for dessert. They're almost better
    >> than you can make at home.

    >
    > You can have my share. Wet cake is not my thing.


    LOL! Dry cake is not mine. I often bake cakes where the cake layers are
    sprinkled with something, sometimes liqueurs or juice-based syrups, etc. I
    guess that's why there are all kinds of cake. :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 09(IX)/03(III)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 5dys 4hrs 14mins
    *******************************************
    Who needs comedians? Journalists are
    much more laughable!
    *******************************************

  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    > either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >
    > Serene


    We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean casserole
    thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was tough.
    Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
    on "A Prairie Home Companion," <http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
    programs/2008/08/30/>

  11. #11
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >> either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean casserole
    > thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    > weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was tough.
    > Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.


    Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were "almost
    as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost as good."

    Serene

    --
    "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins

  12. #12
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    news:[email protected]:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >>> either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>
    >>> Serene

    >>
    >> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean casserole
    >> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was
    >> tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.

    >
    > Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    > "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost as
    > good."


    Isn't validation from young'ns great?

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  13. #13
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Saerah Gray wrote:
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >>>> either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>>
    >>>> Serene
    >>> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean casserole
    >>> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >>> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was
    >>> tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.

    >> Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    >> "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost as
    >> good."

    >
    > Isn't validation from young'ns great?
    >


    Yeah, but I'm lucky like you are. My kid will eat almost anything except
    for most seafood. She'll eat canned tuna and a little bit of shrimp, but
    other than that, no seafood at all.

    Serene

    --
    "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins

  14. #14
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord news:6i9615FpjuhtU12
    @mid.individual.net:

    > Saerah Gray wrote:
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >>>>> either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Serene
    >>>> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean

    casserole
    >>>> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >>>> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was
    >>>> tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.
    >>> Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    >>> "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost

    as
    >>> good."

    >>
    >> Isn't validation from young'ns great?
    >>

    >
    > Yeah, but I'm lucky like you are. My kid will eat almost anything

    except
    > for most seafood. She'll eat canned tuna and a little bit of shrimp,

    but
    > other than that, no seafood at all.
    >
    > Serene
    >


    How about canned salmon? I make a salmon pasta salad that a lot of
    people who don't like most fish will eat. (my mom;s recipe, actually)

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  15. #15
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Wed 03 Sep 2008 09:31:38p, Saerah Gray told us...

    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord news:6i9615FpjuhtU12
    > @mid.individual.net:
    >
    >> Saerah Gray wrote:
    >>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    >>> news:[email protected]:
    >>>
    >>>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    >>>>>> either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Serene
    >>>>> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean

    > casserole
    >>>>> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >>>>> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing was
    >>>>> tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.
    >>>> Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    >>>> "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost

    > as
    >>>> good."
    >>>
    >>> Isn't validation from young'ns great?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yeah, but I'm lucky like you are. My kid will eat almost anything

    > except
    >> for most seafood. She'll eat canned tuna and a little bit of shrimp,

    > but
    >> other than that, no seafood at all.
    >>
    >> Serene
    >>

    >
    > How about canned salmon? I make a salmon pasta salad that a lot of
    > people who don't like most fish will eat. (my mom;s recipe, actually)
    >


    I like to use canned red sockeye salmon to make salmon croquettes or
    patties. I usually make a medium white sauce with finely diced cucumber
    and snippped fresh dill weed to serve over them. I usually serve it with
    mashed potatoes and green peas. This was my mom's recipe, too. She would
    never by pink salmon, only red sockeye. It costs a small fortune now for a
    1 lb. can.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 09(IX)/03(III)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 5dys 2hrs 10mins
    *******************************************
    Misspelled? Impossible. My modem is
    error correcting!
    *******************************************

  16. #16
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> fnord
    news:[email protected] 5.247:

    > On Wed 03 Sep 2008 09:31:38p, Saerah Gray told us...
    >
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord news:6i9615FpjuhtU12
    >> @mid.individual.net:
    >>
    >>> Saerah Gray wrote:
    >>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    >>>> news:[email protected]:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles,
    >>>>>>> and either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Serene
    >>>>>> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean

    >> casserole
    >>>>>> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >>>>>> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing
    >>>>>> was tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.
    >>>>> Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    >>>>> "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost

    >> as
    >>>>> good."
    >>>>
    >>>> Isn't validation from young'ns great?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, but I'm lucky like you are. My kid will eat almost anything

    >> except
    >>> for most seafood. She'll eat canned tuna and a little bit of shrimp,

    >> but
    >>> other than that, no seafood at all.
    >>>
    >>> Serene
    >>>

    >>
    >> How about canned salmon? I make a salmon pasta salad that a lot of
    >> people who don't like most fish will eat. (my mom;s recipe, actually)
    >>

    >
    > I like to use canned red sockeye salmon to make salmon croquettes or
    > patties. I usually make a medium white sauce with finely diced
    > cucumber and snippped fresh dill weed to serve over them. I usually
    > serve it with mashed potatoes and green peas. This was my mom's
    > recipe, too. She would never by pink salmon, only red sockeye. It
    > costs a small fortune now for a 1 lb. can.
    >


    yeah, but for croquettes, it's worth it. the pink stuff is basically
    pink tuna with bones (yay, calcium!)

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Wed 03 Sep 2008 10:05:47p, Saerah Gray told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> fnord
    > news:[email protected] 5.247:
    >
    >> On Wed 03 Sep 2008 09:31:38p, Saerah Gray told us...
    >>
    >>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord news:6i9615FpjuhtU12
    >>> @mid.individual.net:
    >>>
    >>>> Saerah Gray wrote:
    >>>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> fnord
    >>>>> news:[email protected]:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>>>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>>>>> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles,
    >>>>>>>> and either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Serene
    >>>>>>> We had grilled hot dogs from a secret meat shop, baked bean
    >>> casserole
    >>>>>>> thang, terrific locally-grown sweet corn. I didn't care for the
    >>>>>>> weenies; too much sage, too lean (kind of dry), and the casing
    >>>>>>> was tough. Yours sounds lots better. Especially if you had peas.
    >>>>>> Buttered peas. With salt and pepper. The teenager said they were
    >>>>>> "almost as good as the meat. No, maybe better. No, probably almost
    >>> as
    >>>>>> good."
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Isn't validation from young'ns great?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Yeah, but I'm lucky like you are. My kid will eat almost anything
    >>> except
    >>>> for most seafood. She'll eat canned tuna and a little bit of shrimp,
    >>> but
    >>>> other than that, no seafood at all.
    >>>>
    >>>> Serene
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> How about canned salmon? I make a salmon pasta salad that a lot of
    >>> people who don't like most fish will eat. (my mom;s recipe, actually)
    >>>

    >>
    >> I like to use canned red sockeye salmon to make salmon croquettes or
    >> patties. I usually make a medium white sauce with finely diced
    >> cucumber and snippped fresh dill weed to serve over them. I usually
    >> serve it with mashed potatoes and green peas. This was my mom's
    >> recipe, too. She would never by pink salmon, only red sockeye. It
    >> costs a small fortune now for a 1 lb. can.
    >>

    >
    > yeah, but for croquettes, it's worth it. the pink stuff is basically
    > pink tuna with bones (yay, calcium!)
    >


    Hey, I didn't know that! I've never bought the pink stuff before. Mom
    said never buy it, so I didn't. :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 09(IX)/03(III)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 5dys 1hrs 47mins
    *******************************************
    Cats are companions. Dogs are slaves.
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  18. #18
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap meat.
    > I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I found a
    > boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops for $1.49 a
    > pound, so I bought some.
    >
    > The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added sage
    > on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE fan of
    > sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the house does
    > smell pretty good right now.
    >
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and either
    > corn or peas. What are you having?
    >
    > Serene


    I am having a tummy virus and would much rather have what you are having.



  19. #19
    val189 Guest

    Default Re: Inspired by you folks...

    On Sep 3, 8:59 pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > ...I decided to stop into the supermarket today to look at the cheap
    > meat. I don't usually shop at Safeway, but I was walking past. Well, I
    > found a boneless pork roast for $1.79 a pound, and nice-looking chops
    > for $1.49 a pound, so I bought some.
    >
    > The roast I'm doing a little differently from usual, because I added
    > sage on a whim (along with the usual salt/pepper/garlic). I'm not a HUGE
    > fan of sage, but it does seem to go especially well with pork, and the
    > house does smell pretty good right now.
    >
    > I'll be serving it with pickled red cabbage, buttered noodles, and
    > either corn or peas. What are you having?
    >
    > Serene
    > --
    > "I am an agnostic only to the extent that I am agnostic about fairies at
    > the bottom of the garden." -- Richard Dawkins


    I have learned that a little sage goes a long way - even if you are
    doubling a recipe, don't ratchet up the sage.

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