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Thread: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

  1. #1
    Sarah Guest

    Default Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    Hi Everyone,
    I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in a
    dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic hobs.
    I us a gas hob at the moment, but want to switch to electric due the the
    ease of cleaning. Does anyone have an induction hob, and what do you think
    of them? Worth the extra money? DH who does no cooking at all, can't
    understand why I don't pick the cheapest appliances on the market, but this
    project is costing an awful lot of money and I want to get good appliances
    that will last and will be a joy to use!
    Thanks

    Sarah


  2. #2
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote

    > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in
    > a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic
    > hobs.


    What is a 'hob'?



  3. #3
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    cshenk wrote:
    >
    > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in
    > > a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic
    > > hobs.

    >
    > What is a 'hob'?


    From the OP's original context, I'd venture to guess a 'hob' in this
    case would be a counter cooktop, perhaps. Whether built- or plug-in, I
    don't know. Doesn't induction mean one has to use cookware that's
    'magnetic' (er, I mean magnets will stick to the cookware)?

    Sky, who really doesn't have a clue ;D

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    cshenk wrote on Sat, 23 May 2009 12:43:22 -0400:

    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new
    >> kitchen. I'm in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least
    >> 500 more than the ceramic hobs.


    >What is a 'hob'?


    I'd have thought that a long time reader of this International ng would
    have noticed that "hob" is the British word for cook top. Strangely
    enough, even if I did grow up in Britain, I never remember using "hob".
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  5. #5
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?


    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:sSVRl.61956$[email protected]..
    > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm
    >> in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the
    >> ceramic hobs.

    >
    > What is a 'hob'?
    >
    >


    Brit for burner



  6. #6
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:sSVRl.61956$[email protected] on May Sat 2009 am

    > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen.
    >> I'm in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than
    >> the ceramic hobs.

    >
    > What is a 'hob'?
    >
    >
    >


    An induction hob is as fast as gas to reach temp...gives a more even heat across the bottom of the
    pot/pan than either gas or ceramic and is easier to clean than a ceramic burner/hob. Plus it is
    cheaper on your electric bill in the long run.

    The burner cools down faster than ceramic after shutting it off as the actual burner produces no
    heat and is only heated by reflected heat back from the pot/pan.

    Ceramics are affully hard to get to a low simmer as well as hard to clean....I'd go for the induction.

    Don't forget you need ferric based pots/pans to use induction...if a magnet won't stick to your
    pan...it won't heat. (You can readily get pans that work with a non-stick coating.)



    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  7. #7
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?


    "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > Hi Everyone,
    > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in
    > a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic
    > hobs. I us a gas hob at the moment, but want to switch to electric due the
    > the ease of cleaning. Does anyone have an induction hob, and what do you
    > think of them? Worth the extra money? DH who does no cooking at all, can't
    > understand why I don't pick the cheapest appliances on the market, but
    > this project is costing an awful lot of money and I want to get good
    > appliances that will last and will be a joy to use!
    > Thanks
    >
    > Sarah


    Induction hobs are supposed to be very good, but you do need the proper
    cookware for them; must be magnetic. Personally, I'd never switch from gas
    to electric, but I've happily done the opposite. Any of the flat top ranges
    are a bit fussier about having flat cookware.

    Do they make a combo units of standard element and induction?

    Gas burners also works in the case of power failures if that is a concern.
    Usually not a big deal, but we were out for 14 hours a couple of weeks ago
    and still managed to easily cook a nice meal.



  8. #8
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote
    cshenk wrote:
    "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm
    >> > in
    >> > a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the
    >> > ceramic
    >> > hobs.


    >> What is a 'hob'?


    >From the OP's original context, I'd venture to guess a 'hob' in this
    >case would be a counter cooktop, perhaps. Whether built- or plug-in, I
    >don't know. Doesn't induction mean one has to use cookware that's
    >'magnetic' (er, I mean magnets will stick to the cookware)?


    I wasnt sure. Induction to me means a glass top surface but in other spots
    she seems to mean convection oven?

    Oh well, she'll have to say. And the price is a bit much for a mere
    stovetop.



  9. #9
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    cshenk wrote:
    > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in
    >> a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic
    >> hobs.

    >
    > What is a 'hob'?
    >
    >

    burners?? the individual burners to a cooking appliance, I imagine?

  10. #10
    Sarah Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?


    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:JmWRl.62771$[email protected]..
    > "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote
    > cshenk wrote:
    > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>> > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen.
    >>> > I'm in
    >>> > a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the
    >>> > ceramic
    >>> > hobs.

    >
    >>> What is a 'hob'?

    >
    >>From the OP's original context, I'd venture to guess a 'hob' in this
    >>case would be a counter cooktop, perhaps. Whether built- or plug-in, I
    >>don't know. Doesn't induction mean one has to use cookware that's
    >>'magnetic' (er, I mean magnets will stick to the cookware)?

    >
    > I wasnt sure. Induction to me means a glass top surface but in other
    > spots she seems to mean convection oven?
    >
    > Oh well, she'll have to say. And the price is a bit much for a mere
    > stovetop.
    >
    >

    Yes a stove top.

    Sarah


  11. #11
    Sarah Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:T_VRl.4511$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > Induction hobs are supposed to be very good, but you do need the proper
    > cookware for them; must be magnetic. Personally, I'd never switch from
    > gas to electric, but I've happily done the opposite. Any of the flat top
    > ranges are a bit fussier about having flat cookware.
    >
    > Do they make a combo units of standard element and induction?
    >
    > Gas burners also works in the case of power failures if that is a concern.
    > Usually not a big deal, but we were out for 14 hours a couple of weeks ago
    > and still managed to easily cook a nice meal.


    That is a good point! We don't have many power cuts, but I've never had all
    my eggs in one basket, so to speak. The gas burners on my 'stove top' as you
    all seem to call them, are one of the simpler designs (a Neff gas appliance)
    but still require taking to pieces every time I cook to clean it down. The
    electric designs appealed to me with their wipe down surfaces, but the
    ceramic versus induction is what's cause for investigation. The ceramic
    retail from about 250, where as the induction appear to start at at least
    500 and go up to 1000 for top of the range Neff. Is it really that much
    better? Or am I paying for new technology that isn't required?

    Thanks

    Sarah


  12. #12
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    Sarah wrote:
    > Hi Everyone,
    > I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen.
    > I'm in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than
    > the ceramic hobs. I us a gas hob at the moment, but want to switch
    > to
    > electric due the the ease of cleaning. Does anyone have an induction
    > hob, and what do you think of them? Worth the extra money? DH who
    > does no cooking at all, can't understand why I don't pick the
    > cheapest appliances on the market, but this project is costing an
    > awful lot of money and I want to get good appliances that will last
    > and will be a joy to use! Thanks
    >
    > Sarah


    Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your question on
    the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. They'll have much more experience
    with induction hobs than people in the US.

    BTW - to another poster's question, the term "hob" has been around as
    long as I can remember. I can remember my grandmother putting things
    "on the hob"; i.e., stove.

    Dora (ex-pat)


  13. #13
    Matthew Malthouse Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    On Sat, 23 May 2009 13:07:06 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:sSVRl.61956$[email protected]..
    > > "Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm
    > >> in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the
    > >> ceramic hobs.

    > >
    > > What is a 'hob'?
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Brit for burner
    >


    Not just Brit.
    http://www.hgtv.com/kitchens/talk-li...ned/index.html


    Matthew

    --
    Mail to this account goes to the bit bucket.
    In the unlikely event you want to mail me replace usenet with my name

  14. #14
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    Dora wrote on Sat, 23 May 2009 15:26:42 -0400:

    > Sarah wrote:
    >> Hi Everyone,
    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new
    >> kitchen. I'm in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least
    >> 500 more than the ceramic hobs. I us a gas hob at the
    >> moment, but want to switch to electric due the the ease of
    >> cleaning. Does anyone have an induction hob, and what do you think of
    >> them? Worth the extra money? DH who does no cooking at all, can't
    >> understand why I don't pick the cheapest
    >> appliances on the market, but this project is costing
    >> an awful lot of money and I want to get good appliances that will
    >> last and will be a joy to use! Thanks
    >>
    >> Sarah


    > Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your
    > question on the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. They'll have
    > much more experience with induction hobs than people in the
    > US.


    > BTW - to another poster's question, the term "hob" has been
    > around as long as I can remember. I can remember my
    > grandmother putting things "on the hob"; i.e., stove.


    The use of the word "hob" to describe the whole heating unit or cooktop
    is fairly recent. The "hob" was originally not the heater but the
    supports that held the pots over a fire as the Oxford Dictionary will
    verify.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    On Sat, 23 May 2009 12:43:22 -0400, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Sarah" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in
    >> a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic
    >> hobs.

    >
    >What is a 'hob'?
    >

    a burner


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  16. #16
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    On May 23, 12:26*pm, "Dora" <limey...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your question on
    > the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. * They'll have much more experience
    > with induction hobs than people in the US.
    >

    Based only on the stuff that gets crossposted I wouldn't trust them.
    Try rec.food.equipment instead. -aem

  17. #17
    graham Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On May 23, 12:26 pm, "Dora" <limey...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your question on
    > the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. They'll have much more experience
    > with induction hobs than people in the US.
    >

    Based only on the stuff that gets crossposted I wouldn't trust them.
    ________________________________________________

    The regulars there are decent folk! The x-posts have come from trolls!



  18. #18
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Dora wrote on Sat, 23 May 2009 15:26:42 -0400:
    >
    >> Sarah wrote:
    >>> Hi Everyone,
    >>> I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new
    >>> kitchen. I'm in a dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least
    >>> 500 more than the ceramic hobs. I us a gas hob at the
    >>> moment, but want to switch to electric due the the ease of
    >>> cleaning. Does anyone have an induction hob, and what do you think
    >>> of them? Worth the extra money? DH who does no cooking at all,
    >>> can't
    >>> understand why I don't pick the cheapest
    >>> appliances on the market, but this project is costing
    >>> an awful lot of money and I want to get good appliances that will
    >>> last and will be a joy to use! Thanks
    >>>
    >>> Sarah

    >
    >> Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your
    >> question on the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. They'll have
    >> much more experience with induction hobs than people in the
    >> US.

    >
    >> BTW - to another poster's question, the term "hob" has been
    >> around as long as I can remember. I can remember my
    >> grandmother putting things "on the hob"; i.e., stove.

    >
    > The use of the word "hob" to describe the whole heating unit or
    > cooktop is fairly recent. The "hob" was originally not the heater
    > but
    > the supports that held the pots over a fire as the Oxford Dictionary
    > will verify.


    Could be. All I remember is that she had a behemoth in the kitchen -
    coal fire on one side of the monster and the range on the other.
    Things were taken off and put back on "the hob".
    She even had a spit in front of the fire, on which she cooked the
    turkeys. I'm talking "w a y b a c k" there, since I am now
    two hundred and seventyfive years old.


  19. #19
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On May 23, 12:26 pm, "Dora" <limey...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> Sarah, I think you'll receive good advice by posting your question
    >> on
    >> the uk.food+drink.misc newsgroup. They'll have much more experience
    >> with induction hobs than people in the US.
    >>

    > Based only on the stuff that gets crossposted I wouldn't trust them.
    > Try rec.food.equipment instead. -aem


    I do trust them and they often mention induction hobs. BTW, don't
    judge them by the crossposters.


  20. #20
    Nathalie Chiva Guest

    Default Re: Induction hobs? Worth the extra money?

    On Sat, 23 May 2009 17:25:56 +0100, "Sarah"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi Everyone,
    >I'm in the process of picking all my appliances for my new kitchen. I'm in a
    >dilemma, as the induction hobs are at least 500 more than the ceramic hobs.
    >I us a gas hob at the moment, but want to switch to electric due the the
    >ease of cleaning. Does anyone have an induction hob, and what do you think
    >of them? Worth the extra money? DH who does no cooking at all, can't
    >understand why I don't pick the cheapest appliances on the market, but this
    >project is costing an awful lot of money and I want to get good appliances
    >that will last and will be a joy to use!
    >Thanks
    >
    >Sarah


    I'll be short: I've been cooking on induction for the last 11 years.
    If I have a choice, I'll never get back to everything else. It has all
    the pros of gas (fast reaction, high power), of electricity
    (simmering, safeness) and some more (plate stops when there's nothing
    on it, extremely easy to clean because nothing ever burns on it, never
    gets hot enough to be really dangerous). The only con is that you have
    to have induction-compatible pots and pans, but that to me is
    negligible - all the good traditional cast-iron pots work, and the
    frying pans you have to change every 5 years or so anyway, so why not
    change them now.

    Nathalie in Switzerland

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