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Thread: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    $1.37/lb at Walmart. And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. Fo
    course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    it's Walmart.

    Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    processor.

    What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    can be stored without losing it's potency? Yes, I have plenty of
    small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    endure the grating).

    -sw

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >can be stored without losing it's potency?


    I imagine it can be frozen intact. We freeze ginger root, that works.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > $1.37/lb at Walmart. And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. Fo
    > course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > it's Walmart.
    >
    > Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    > my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > processor.
    >
    > What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    > can be stored without losing it's potency? Yes, I have plenty of
    > small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > endure the grating).


    In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. Refrigerate in an airtight container.
    Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."

    The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    characteristic punch."

    HTH.

    Sky

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  4. #4
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 12:40:49 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    snip
    >
    >Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    >processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    >container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    >my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    >for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    >processor.

    snip

    >-sw


    from what you are saying, you ground the horseradish and put it in a
    jar. You need to add enough vinegar to keep the ground root covered.
    A little salt is nice too. Covered with vinegar it should still be
    potent for a couple of months.
    Janet US

  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 17:54:40 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >>can be stored without losing it's potency?

    >
    > I imagine it can be frozen intact. We freeze ginger root, that works.


    I would be worried that freezing would rupture the cells and realease
    all the volitiles. Just like with the food processor.

    Besides, that's just delaying the inevitable. I would still to use
    it.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:28:15 -0500, Sky wrote:

    > On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >> Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    >> $1.37/lb at Walmart. And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. Fo
    >> course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    >> it's Walmart.
    >>
    >> Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    >> processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    >> container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    >> my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    >> for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    >> processor.
    >>
    >> What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >> can be stored without losing it's potency? Yes, I have plenty of
    >> small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    >> endure the grating).

    >
    > In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    > article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    > horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    > white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. Refrigerate in an airtight container.
    > Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."
    >
    > The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    > "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    > "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    > characteristic punch."


    But what else can I do with it except for dips and spreads?

    Thanks for transcribing, but if I grind it for use in dips, I want it
    to last as long as the stuff in jars. Which is several months up to a
    year.

    -sw

  7. #7
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Jun 25, 12:53*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:28:15 -0500, Sky wrote:
    > > On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >> Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > >> $1.37/lb at Walmart. *And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. *Fo
    > >> course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > >> it's Walmart.

    >
    > >> Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > >> processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > >> container in the fridge. *So I'm not willing to try that again. *And
    > >> my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > >> for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > >> processor.

    >
    > >> What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    > >> can be stored without losing it's potency? *Yes, I have plenty of
    > >> small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > >> endure the grating).

    >
    > > In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    > > article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    > > horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    > > white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. *Refrigerate in an airtight container.
    > > * Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."

    >
    > > The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    > > "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    > > "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    > > characteristic punch."

    >
    > But what else can I do with it except for dips and spreads?
    >
    > Thanks for transcribing, but if I grind it for use in dips, I want it
    > to last as long as the stuff in jars. *Which is several months up to a
    > year.
    >
    > -sw


    I found this article....evidently when you put the vinegar in makes a
    difference.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_7334768_make...rseradish.html

  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Jun 25, 12:53*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:28:15 -0500, Sky wrote:
    > > On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >> Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > >> $1.37/lb at Walmart. *And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. *Fo
    > >> course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > >> it's Walmart.

    >
    > >> Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > >> processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > >> container in the fridge. *So I'm not willing to try that again. *And
    > >> my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > >> for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > >> processor.

    >
    > >> What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    > >> can be stored without losing it's potency? *Yes, I have plenty of
    > >> small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > >> endure the grating).

    >
    > > In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    > > article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    > > horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    > > white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. *Refrigerate in an airtight container.
    > > * Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."

    >
    > > The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    > > "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    > > "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    > > characteristic punch."

    >
    > But what else can I do with it except for dips and spreads?
    >
    > Thanks for transcribing, but if I grind it for use in dips, I want it
    > to last as long as the stuff in jars. *Which is several months up to a
    > year.
    >
    > -sw


    http://www.horseradish.org/homepage.html

  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    >processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    >container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    >my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    >for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    >processor.
    >
    >What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >can be stored without losing it's potency? Yes, I have plenty of
    >small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    >endure the grating).


    My grandmother used to prepare horseradish outdoors, she used an old
    hand cranked meat grinder... that's what most folks did back then,
    making sure to position themselves so the wind blew away the fumes.
    During winter she'd grate horseradish on the outside windowsill with
    the sash pulled down so there was just enough room for her hands to
    work... that's how many people who lived in old brick buildings grated
    horseradish.

  10. #10
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Jun 25, 3:28*pm, Sky <skyho...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote:
    > On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > > $1.37/lb at Walmart. *And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. *Fo
    > > course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > > it's Walmart.

    >
    > > Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > > processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > > container in the fridge. *So I'm not willing to try that again. *And
    > > my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > > for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > > processor.

    >
    > > What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it


    That's an odd choice of word. In German (spelled Schlange", it means
    "snake, serpent; (vulg. penis)".

    > > can be stored without losing it's potency? *Yes, I have plenty of
    > > small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > > endure the grating).

    >
    > In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    > article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    > horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    > white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. *Refrigerate in an airtight container..
    > * Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."


    That souds about right, although the salt is unnecessary.

    > The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    > "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    > "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    > characteristic punch."


    There has to be more to it that that, as anyone who has bitten into
    fresh horseradish must know. The Japanese grate it very fine, dry it
    quickiy, dye it green, and call it "wasabi".

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  11. #11
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Jun 25, 3:53*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:28:15 -0500, Sky wrote:
    > > On 6/25/2011 12:40 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >> Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > >> $1.37/lb at Walmart. *And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. *Fo
    > >> course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > >> it's Walmart.

    >
    > >> Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > >> processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > >> container in the fridge. *So I'm not willing to try that again. *And
    > >> my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > >> for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > >> processor.

    >
    > >> What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    > >> can be stored without losing it's potency? *Yes, I have plenty of
    > >> small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > >> endure the grating).

    >
    > > In the July/August 2011 edition of Cook's Illustrated, there's an
    > > article on page 2 that recommends "for every 8- to 10-inch-long
    > > horseradish root finely grated (or cut), add 6 TBS of water, 3 TBS of
    > > white vinegar, & 0.5 tsp of salt. *Refrigerate in an airtight container.
    > > * Mixture will hold the heat for up to two weeks."

    >
    > > The 'blurb' mentions that once grated or cut, an enzyme called
    > > "myrosinase" is released and reacts with "another compound to form
    > > "allyl isothiocyanate, the chemical that provides horseradish its
    > > characteristic punch."

    >
    > But what else can I do with it except for dips and spreads?
    >
    > Thanks for transcribing, but if I grind it for use in dips, I want it
    > to last as long as the stuff in jars. *Which is several months up to a
    > year.


    The stuff in jars has already lost its bite. Try keeping it frozen and
    grating only what you need. When we grate lots of it for Passover, we
    keep it with no added liquid in bowls covered with plastic wrap, and
    we try to do it outdoors. It looses a bit of its edge by the second
    night

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  12. #12
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > Just as I said that fresh horseradish costs $7/lb I see it going for
    > $1.37/lb at Walmart. And it was fairly fresh - not very limp. Fo
    > course it rang up at $5/lb, which isn't totally unexpected considering
    > it's Walmart.
    >
    > Anyway, the only time I've made prepared horseradish in the food
    > processor it lost all it's potency in 24 hours sitting in a closed
    > container in the fridge. So I'm not willing to try that again. And
    > my mini food processor broke so making small batches of dips and stuff
    > for immediate use would be impractical in the large blender or food
    > processor.
    >
    > What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    > can be stored without losing it's potency? Yes, I have plenty of
    > small graters, but not sure I really want a dip (or that I want to
    > endure the grating).


    I use fresh horseradish the same way I use fresh ginger and fresh
    nutmeg. I chop/grind it just before using. It stays fine as the large
    root.

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 12:56:49 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags wrote:

    > I found this article....evidently when you put the vinegar in makes a
    > difference.
    >
    > http://www.ehow.com/how_7334768_make...rseradish.html


    I followed that last time, and after 24 hours there was no heat. Let
    me repeat: I'm not going to do that again.

    Can I roast the roots, for example. Can I batter and deep fry them?
    Can I pickle them? Anything OTHER using a food processor or blender.

    =sw

  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 13:22:55 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Avins wrote:

    > The stuff in jars has already lost its bite.


    I have a jar of Atmoic Horseradish that hasn't lost a bit of bite.
    Another reason I don't want to pulverize it - because I already some
    perfectly good prepared horseradish.

    -sw

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 13:18:16 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Avins wrote:

    > On Jun 25, 3:28*pm, Sky <skyho...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote:
    >
    >>> What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it

    >
    > That's an odd choice of word. In German (spelled Schlange", it means
    > "snake, serpent; (vulg. penis)".


    <clapping hands>

    -sw

  16. #16
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 13:48:30 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > from what you are saying, you ground the horseradish and put it in a
    > jar. You need to add enough vinegar to keep the ground root covered.
    > A little salt is nice too. Covered with vinegar it should still be
    > potent for a couple of months.
    > Janet US


    I did "fix" it with vinegar and a little mayo (or was it sour cream?)
    one of those two.

    -sw

  17. #17
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 17:54:40 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Steve Pope) wrote:

    >Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >>can be stored without losing it's potency?

    >
    >I imagine it can be frozen intact. We freeze ginger root, that works.


    I think he's asking about after it's grated.. I don't think I'd freeze
    horseradish or ginger after they're grated... I wouldn't freeze whole
    horseradish roots either. Prepared horseradish doesn't have a very
    long shelf life, which is why jars at the store are relatively small
    and have expiration dates. Whole horseradish roots can be buried in
    the ground over winter in cold climes but I don't know about warm
    climes.

  18. #18
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    "Sqwertz" schrieb :
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 12:56:49 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >> I found this article....evidently when you put the vinegar in makes a
    >> difference.
    >>
    >> http://www.ehow.com/how_7334768_make...rseradish.html

    >
    > I followed that last time, and after 24 hours there was no heat. Let
    > me repeat: I'm not going to do that again.
    >
    > Can I roast the roots, for example. Can I batter and deep fry them?
    > Can I pickle them? Anything OTHER using a food processor or blender.
    >


    To cut it short : No.

    To make it last longer while keeping the punch :
    Peel only the bit you want to use. Grate that.
    Keep the rest of the root in a glass of water vertically (1/2 - 2/3
    submerged).
    Change the water once per 2 days.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  19. #19
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:49:53 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 17:54:40 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>What else can I do with this schlong? How else would I grind it so it
    >>>can be stored without losing it's potency?

    >>
    >> I imagine it can be frozen intact. We freeze ginger root, that works.

    >
    >I would be worried that freezing would rupture the cells and realease
    >all the volitiles. Just like with the food processor.
    >
    >Besides, that's just delaying the inevitable. I would still to use
    >it.


    My dad has been freezing it for years. He grates it directly on a
    sandwich or uses it at the table as a add on. Or grinds it up for
    cocktail sauce.

    IME it doesn't lose potency until ground [salt, sugar and vinegar slow
    that process]-- or left to wilt.

    Jim

  20. #20
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Ideas for Fresh Horseradish

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 15:47:08 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 13:48:30 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    >> from what you are saying, you ground the horseradish and put it in a
    >> jar. You need to add enough vinegar to keep the ground root covered.
    >> A little salt is nice too. Covered with vinegar it should still be
    >> potent for a couple of months.
    >> Janet US

    >
    >I did "fix" it with vinegar and a little mayo (or was it sour cream?)
    >one of those two.
    >


    I suspect it was the fat in whichever that stole the bite.

    If it was super strong when you got done mixing-- it should have
    stayed that way for a few weeks, at least.

    [but I think freezing the raw root & grinding fresh is the way to the
    hottest brew.]

    Jim

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