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Thread: I want to make this soup but . . .

  1. #1
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default I want to make this soup but . . .

    Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with Thyme
    Butter".
    I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. I have visions of it tasting
    like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!

    Question(s) is, do you think :
    1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    2 - I can skip the turnips?
    3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?

    ORIGINAL RECIPE (da whoooooole megillah!)
    8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, room temperature
    3 tablespoons minced fresh thyme

    6 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    10 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
    1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, each cut into 8 wedges
    1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
    1/2 cup whipping cream

    preparation

    Mix 6 tablespoons butter and thyme in small bowl to blend well. Season
    thyme butter to taste with salt and pepper.

    Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large pot over medium
    heat. Add leeks and garlic and saut until leeks are tender but not
    brown, about 10 minutes. Add 10 cups broth, celery root, turnips, and
    parsnips; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until
    vegetables are very tender, about 50 minutes. Cool slightly. Working
    in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to pot.
    Stir in cream. Season with salt and pepper. (Thyme butter and soup can
    be made 1 day ahead. Wrap butter in plastic wrap. Cool soup slightly.
    Refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Rewarm
    soup over medium heat, adding more broth, if desired, to thin.)

    Ladle soup into 12 bowls. Top each with small piece of thyme butter;
    swirl into soup and serve.

    Thanks for your support ;-)
    Lynn in Fargo

    PS: I also think I will make half the recipe. 12 bowls is a little too
    much for just me!

  2. #2
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    On Jan 7, 8:49�pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    > Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with Thyme
    > Butter".
    > I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    > But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    > I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. �I have visions of it tasting
    > like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!
    >
    > Question(s) �is, do you think :
    > 1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    > 2 - �I can skip the turnips?
    > 3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?
    >
    > ORIGINAL RECIPE (da whoooooole megillah!)
    > 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, room temperature
    > 3 tablespoons minced fresh thyme
    >
    > 6 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
    > 2 garlic cloves, minced
    > 10 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    > 2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
    > 1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, each cut into 8 wedges
    > 1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
    > 1/2 cup whipping cream
    >
    > preparation
    >
    > Mix 6 tablespoons butter and thyme in small bowl to blend well. Season
    > thyme butter to taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large pot over medium
    > heat. Add leeks and garlic and saut� until leeks are tender but not
    > brown, about 10 minutes. Add 10 cups broth, celery root, turnips, and
    > parsnips; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until
    > vegetables are very tender, about 50 minutes. Cool slightly. Working
    > in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to pot.
    > Stir in cream. Season with salt and pepper. (Thyme butter and soup can
    > be made 1 day ahead. Wrap butter in plastic wrap. Cool soup slightly.
    > Refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Rewarm
    > soup over medium heat, adding more broth, if desired, to thin.)
    >
    > Ladle soup into 12 bowls. Top each with small piece of thyme butter;
    > swirl into soup and serve.
    >
    > Thanks for your support �;-)
    > Lynn in Fargo
    >
    > PS: I also think I will make half the recipe. 12 bowls is a little too
    > much for just me!


    Don't be so ascared to try new things... strange produce is the least
    to be frightened of... worrry more about strange animal products.

    celeriac [seh-LER-ay-ak]
    This rather ugly, knobby, brown vegetable is actually the root of a
    special celery cultivated specifically for its root. It's also called
    celery root and celery knob . Celeriac tastes like a cross between a
    strong celery and parsley. It's available from September through May
    and can range anywhere from the size of an apple to that of a small
    cantaloupe. Choose a relatively small, firm celeriac with a minimum of
    rootlets and knobs. Avoid those with soft spots, which signal decay.
    The inedible green leaves are usually detached by the time you buy
    celeriac. Refrigerate the root in a plastic bag for 7 to 10 days.
    Celeriac can be eaten raw or cooked. Before using, peel and soak
    briefly in ACIDULATED WATER to prevent discoloration. To eat raw,
    grate or shred celeriac and use in salads. Cooked, it's wonderful in
    soups, stews and purees. It can also be boiled, braised, saut�ed and
    baked. Celeriac contains small amounts of vitamin B, calcium and
    iron.

    � Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

  3. #3
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    On Jan 7, 8:00*pm, Sheldon <PENMAR...@aol.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 8:49 pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with Thyme
    > > Butter".
    > > I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    > > But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    > > I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. I have visions of it tasting
    > > like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!

    >
    > > Question(s) is, do you think :
    > > 1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    > > 2 - I can skip the turnips?
    > > 3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?

    >
    > > ORIGINAL RECIPE (da whoooooole megillah!)
    > > 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, room temperature
    > > 3 tablespoons minced fresh thyme

    >
    > > 6 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
    > > 2 garlic cloves, minced
    > > 10 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    > > 2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
    > > 1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, each cut into 8 wedges
    > > 1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
    > > 1/2 cup whipping cream

    >
    > > preparation

    >
    > > Mix 6 tablespoons butter and thyme in small bowl to blend well. Season
    > > thyme butter to taste with salt and pepper.

    >
    > > Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large pot over medium
    > > heat. Add leeks and garlic and saut until leeks are tender but not
    > > brown, about 10 minutes. Add 10 cups broth, celery root, turnips, and
    > > parsnips; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until
    > > vegetables are very tender, about 50 minutes. Cool slightly. Working
    > > in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to pot.
    > > Stir in cream. Season with salt and pepper. (Thyme butter and soup can
    > > be made 1 day ahead. Wrap butter in plastic wrap. Cool soup slightly.
    > > Refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Rewarm
    > > soup over medium heat, adding more broth, if desired, to thin.)

    >
    > > Ladle soup into 12 bowls. Top each with small piece of thyme butter;
    > > swirl into soup and serve.

    >
    > > Thanks for your support ;-)
    > > Lynn in Fargo

    >
    > > PS: I also think I will make half the recipe. 12 bowls is a little too
    > > much for just me!

    >
    > Don't be so ascared to try new things... strange produce is the least
    > to be frightened of... worrry more about strange animal products.
    >
    > celeriac *[seh-LER-ay-ak]
    > This rather ugly, knobby, brown vegetable is actually the root of a
    > special celery cultivated specifically for its root. It's also called
    > celery root *and celery knob . Celeriac tastes like a cross between a
    > strong celery and parsley. It's available from September through May
    > and can range anywhere from the size of an apple to that of a small
    > cantaloupe. Choose a relatively small, firm celeriac with a minimum of
    > rootlets and knobs. Avoid those with soft spots, which signal decay.
    > The inedible green leaves are usually detached by the time you buy
    > celeriac. Refrigerate the root in a plastic bag for 7 to 10 days.
    > Celeriac can be eaten raw or cooked. Before using, peel and soak
    > briefly in ACIDULATED WATER to prevent discoloration. To eat raw,
    > grate or shred celeriac and use in salads. Cooked, it's wonderful in
    > soups, stews and purees. It can also be boiled, braised, saut ed and
    > baked. Celeriac contains small amounts of vitamin B, calcium and
    > iron.
    >
    > Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    > LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.


    Sheldon, dear . . .
    I'm not afraid of produce (except egg plants). I wish I had thought
    to look it up in STH's book! I'm hoping to hear from somebody who
    really likes celariac. Meanwhile I'll start looking for celeriac in
    the produce section . . . it only shows up periodically.
    THanks for your encouraging answer :-)
    Lynn in Fargo

  4. #4
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    Lynn wrote:

    > I'm not afraid of produce (except egg plants). I wish I had thought to
    > look it up in STH's book! I'm hoping to hear from somebody who really
    > likes celariac. Meanwhile I'll start looking for celeriac in the produce
    > section . . . it only shows up periodically.


    I like celeriac, and buy it this time of year. The article that Sheldon
    posted is correct; celeriac tastes like a mixture of celery and parsley. It
    makes FANTASTIC soup. Feel free to skip the turnips; I don't think they'd be
    as good in the soup as either of the other two vegetables. I'd use carrots
    instead, or just increase the quantities of celeriac and parsnips.

    In your earlier post you wrote that you were thinking about substituting
    tarragon for the thyme, then you went on to say that the idea of fennel with
    parsnips scares you. Well, tarragon *has* a bit of that same licorice flavor
    that fennel has, so if you don't want that flavor you'd be better off using
    something other than tarragon. Dried thyme rather than fresh would work;
    you'd want about 1 tablespoon of it. Or you could use dried savory if you've
    got it.

    Bob






  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    "Lynn from Fargo"
    Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with
    ThymeButter".I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. I have visions of it tasting
    like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!

    Question(s) is, do you think :
    1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?

    Why? Shoul you not see what the originator had in mind first? Can you pick
    something better when you don't even know celeriac?

    2 - I can skip the turnips?

    I wouldn't. This looks like it could be a very subtle and worthwhile
    combination. If it turns out not to be, junk the recipe.

    3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?

    Sort of celery, certainly not fennel/anise. I love it and wouldn't like my
    winter without it. You can also cube it, toss with a bit of oil, S&P, bake
    covered until done. Simmered and then pureed. Celeri remoulade is
    wonderful. In general it adds body and umami to broths and casseroles.



  6. #6
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:49:10 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with Thyme
    >Butter".
    >I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    >But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    >I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. I have visions of it tasting
    >like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!
    >
    >Question(s) is, do you think :
    >1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    >2 - I can skip the turnips?
    >3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?


    Celeriac is VERY mildly flavoured. It doesn't taste anything at all
    like aniseed or licorice or fennel (thank goodness - that is one
    flavour I can't STAND!) It just tastes kind of like celery...

  7. #7
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    You're on safe ground, Lynn. No tarragon. Turnips
    will add a bit of bite. The other posts are right
    about celeriac; I have one in my kitchen at the
    moment. (Come to think of it... I have a parsnip,
    too. No leek, tho.) The thyme is for the chicken
    broth. I have made a soup like this with beef
    broth, lacking the cream, and substituting
    marjoram for the thyme. If you want it lighter,
    skip the cream .... at least taste the soup w/o
    the cream, first....... you'll find it very good.
    When I make it, I add dices of kohlrabi.

    Alex

    On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:49:10 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Question(s) is, do you think :
    >1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    >2 - I can skip the turnips?
    >3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?
    >



    >
    >6 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
    >2 garlic cloves, minced
    >10 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    >2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
    >1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, each cut into 8 wedges
    >1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
    >1/2 cup whipping cream
    >


  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Lynn from Fargo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Question(s) is, do you think :


    > 3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?


    > Thanks for your support ;-)
    > Lynn in Fargo


    Come over and sit by me so I can slap you without having to reach, you
    Goof! LOL!! I have to think that if it's celery root it's going to
    taste like celery. OTOH, if it were fenneleriac, I'd imagine it *would*
    taste like fennel. "-)
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    <http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor>
    December 27, 2008, 7:30 a.m.: "I have fixed my roof,
    I have mended my fences; now let the winter winds blow."

  9. #9
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    On Jan 8, 10:12�am, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > In article
    > <5662be50-19a7-406a-9c08-cbeacf8ec...@v39g2000pro.googlegroups.com>,
    > �Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    >
    > > Question(s) �is, do you think :
    > > 3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?
    > > Thanks for your support �;-)
    > > Lynn in Fargo

    >
    > Come over and sit by me so I can slap you without having to reach, you
    > Goof! � LOL!! � I have to think that if it's celery root it's going to
    > taste like celery. �OTOH, if it were fenneleriac, I'd imagine it *would*
    > taste like fennel. � "-)


    Celeriac is like white beets doncha know. hehe

    Actually celeriac does taste kinda beetish, it has that certain
    earthiness that folks who worship kapusta wouldn't know. LOL


  10. #10
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: I want to make this soup but . . .

    On Jan 7, 9:15�pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 8:00�pm, Sheldon <PENMAR...@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 7, 8:49 pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:

    >
    > > > Found this in epicurious called "White Root Vegetable Soup with Thyme
    > > > Butter".
    > > > I figured it must have parsnips in it and it do!
    > > > But it also has turnips and celery root (celeriac). I love celery, but
    > > > I'm not sure what celeriac tastes like. I have visions of it tasting
    > > > like fennel and fennel with parsnip scares me!

    >
    > > > Question(s) is, do you think :
    > > > 1 - I could use fresh tarragon instead of thyme?
    > > > 2 - I can skip the turnips?
    > > > 3 - celeriac tastes like celery or does it taste like fennel/anise?

    >
    > > > ORIGINAL RECIPE (da whoooooole megillah!)
    > > > 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, room temperature
    > > > 3 tablespoons minced fresh thyme

    >
    > > > 6 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
    > > > 2 garlic cloves, minced
    > > > 10 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    > > > 2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
    > > > 1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, each cut into 8 wedges
    > > > 1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
    > > > 1/2 cup whipping cream

    >
    > > > preparation

    >
    > > > Mix 6 tablespoons butter and thyme in small bowl to blend well. Season
    > > > thyme butter to taste with salt and pepper.

    >
    > > > Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large pot over medium
    > > > heat. Add leeks and garlic and saut until leeks are tender but not
    > > > brown, about 10 minutes. Add 10 cups broth, celery root, turnips, and
    > > > parsnips; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until
    > > > vegetables are very tender, about 50 minutes. Cool slightly. Working
    > > > in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to pot.
    > > > Stir in cream. Season with salt and pepper. (Thyme butter and soup can
    > > > be made 1 day ahead. Wrap butter in plastic wrap. Cool soup slightly.
    > > > Refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Rewarm
    > > > soup over medium heat, adding more broth, if desired, to thin.)

    >
    > > > Ladle soup into 12 bowls. Top each with small piece of thyme butter;
    > > > swirl into soup and serve.

    >
    > > > Thanks for your support ;-)
    > > > Lynn in Fargo

    >
    > > > PS: I also think I will make half the recipe. 12 bowls is a little too
    > > > much for just me!

    >
    > > Don't be so ascared to try new things... strange produce is the least
    > > to be frightened of... worrry more about strange animal products.

    >
    > > celeriac �[seh-LER-ay-ak]
    > > This rather ugly, knobby, brown vegetable is actually the root of a
    > > special celery cultivated specifically for its root. It's also called
    > > celery root �and celery knob . Celeriac tastes like a cross between a
    > > strong celery and parsley. It's available from September through May
    > > and can range anywhere from the size of an apple to that of a small
    > > cantaloupe. Choose a relatively small, firm celeriac with a minimum of
    > > rootlets and knobs. Avoid those with soft spots, which signal decay.
    > > The inedible green leaves are usually detached by the time you buy
    > > celeriac. Refrigerate the root in a plastic bag for 7 to 10 days.
    > > Celeriac can be eaten raw or cooked. Before using, peel and soak
    > > briefly in ACIDULATED WATER to prevent discoloration. To eat raw,
    > > grate or shred celeriac and use in salads. Cooked, it's wonderful in
    > > soups, stews and purees. It can also be boiled, braised, saut ed and
    > > baked. Celeriac contains small amounts of vitamin B, calcium and
    > > iron.

    >
    > > Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    > > LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

    >
    > Sheldon, dear . . .
    > I'm not afraid of produce (except egg plants). �


    I never tried planting an egg, is that poultry is grown? I think you
    mean eggplant... and eggplant is one of those words like sheep and
    shrimp.

    > I wish I had thought
    > to look it up in STH's book! �I'm hoping to hear from somebody who
    > really likes celariac. Meanwhile I'll start looking for celeriac in
    > the produce section . . . it only shows up periodically.


    Yes, celeriac is very seasonal, and not very popular as most folks are
    unfamiliar with it and are ascared of how it looks. But celeriac is
    an excellent addition to many types of soup, especially good for
    chicken stock and potato soups. I would follow that recipe and
    definitely not omit turnips (there are many types of turnip)... root
    vegetable soups are really more about textures... add each in it's
    proper order so none overcook... I would also add lots of potato, and
    mushrooms (preferably dehy). As when trying any new ingredient start
    off in moderation, then as you become more familiar you can build
    layer upon layer. Root vegetable soups also adore a tinge of
    saffron. If you omit the whipping cream from a portion you can freeze
    this soup, so I would make the full recipe, in fact I would double
    it... root vegetable soup makes a great base for many other soups/
    dishes. I wouldn't bother adding any cream, just puree a portion.
    And this is not something for pressure processors and crock pots, this
    is a constantly taste as you go endeaver... I don't like a strong
    parsnip flavor so I'd use just one for flavoring and just make a few
    shallow cuts so it holds together so it can be retrieved later and
    added to your compost bin. And for this soup I'd use white pepper.
    Garnish with a carrot curl and a light dusting of lemon zest.

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