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Thread: I finally made fried chicken

  1. #1
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default I finally made fried chicken

    in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    for.

    And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    in the quantities you need to fry chicken. And then, unless you
    make it all the time so that you can reuse the oil several times
    before you have to throw it out, thus getting your money's worth
    out of it, well, it's expensive. And then there's the cleaning up.
    What a pain in the butt.

    So, okay, I made the chicken. (recipe follows) It was okay.
    I sort of followed a Cook's Country recipe for Extra Crunchy
    Fried Chicken. It involves "brining" the chicken in buttermilk
    and salt for 1 hour prior to cooking. The flour has garlic powder,
    thyme, pepper, and baking powder in it. But you're supposed to add
    some buttermilk to the flour mixture and rub it in with your fingers to
    make a mealy consistency. I decided to dispense with that part as too
    much trouble, besides being just plain weird. I just took the chicken
    out of the buttermilk and didn't drain it a lot and coated it with
    the flour. I think it gave me pretty much the same effect as their
    method.

    I fried it according to their directions as well as I could, given
    the thermometer problems. It turned out pretty well. I thought it
    was a little salty so I would use a lot less salt next time. Also,
    I thought it was *too* crunchy. But I liked it okay.

    EXTRA-CRUNCHY FRIED CHICKEN

    2 c. buttermilk + 6 additional tablespoons
    2 T. salt
    1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces (~ 3 1/2 lb.)
    3 c. flour
    2 t. baking powder
    1/4 t. thyme
    1/2 t. black pepper
    1/2 t. garlic powder
    4-5 c. vegetable shortening or peanut oil

    Whisk together 2 c. buttermilk and salt in large bowl until salt is
    dissolved. Add chicken pieces to bowl and stir to coat; cover bowl with
    plastic, and refrigerate for 1 hour. (Don’t let chicken soak much
    longer or it will become too salty.) Whisk flour, baking powder, thyme,
    pepper, and garlic powder together in large bowl. Add remaining 6
    tablespoons buttermilk; with your fingers rub flour and buttermilk
    together until buttermilk is evenly incorporated into flour and mixture
    resembles coarse wet sand. Working in batches of two, drop chicken
    pieces into flour mixture and turn to thoroughly coat, gently pressing
    flour mixture onto chicken. Shake excess flour from each piece of
    chicken and transfer to wire rack set over rimmed baking sheet. Heat
    oil (it should measure 3/4" deep) in large heavy-bottomed Dutch oven
    with 11" diameter over medium-high heat until it reaches 375F. Place
    chicken pieces, skin-side down, in oil, cover, and fry until deep golden
    brown, 8-10 minutes. Remove lid after 4 minutes and lift chicken pieces
    to check for even browning; rearrange if some pieces are browning faster
    than others. (At this point, oil should be about 300F. Adjust burner,
    if necessary, to regulate temperature of oil.) Turn chicken pieces over
    and continue to fry, uncovered, until chicken pieces are deep golden
    brown on second side, 6-8 minutes longer. (At this point, to keep
    chicken from browning too quickly, adjust burner to maintain oil
    temperature of about 315F.) Using tongs, transfer chicken to plate
    lined with paper towels; let stand for 5 minutes to drain. Serve.
    Serves 4. (We wanted to create juicy, rich tasting fried chicken at
    home without the big mess, and with a crust as crunchy as KFC. Keeping
    the oil at the correct temperature is essential to producing crunchy
    fried chicken that is neither too brown nor too greasy. Use a
    candy/deep-fry thermometer to check the temperature of the oil before
    you add the chicken. If you cannot find a chicken that weighs 3 1/2 lb.
    or less, or if you don’t have a pan that is 11" in diameter, you will
    have to fry the chicken in two batches. Follow the recipe, frying the
    chicken four pieces at a time and keeping the first batch warm in a 200F
    oven while the second batch is cooking. From Cook’s Country TV)

    To go with it I made a roasted potato salad. I had some baby white
    potatoes which I cut into approximately 8-10 pieces each. I sprayed
    a baking sheet lined with non-stick foil with olive oil PAM and then
    spread the potatoes on the sheet, salted and peppered them, and then
    sprayed the potatoes with the PAM. Baked for about 1/2 hour at 350F
    until nice and brown. Cooled to just warm to the touch. Meanwhile
    fried some diced bacon. Also had some shallots left over from something
    so I chopped them up. Put potatoes in bowl and added diced bacon and
    shallots. Then I sprinkled on some seasoned salt and added MW and a
    splash of fake balsamic vinegar and mixed it all up. It was quite
    tasty.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  2. #2
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    > that's just another gadget to find a place for. *And I probably
    > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > for.


    > Kate
    >


    Actually, good instant-read thermometers are really inexpensive, and
    accurate.

    N.

  3. #3
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    Nancy2 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Kate writes:
    >
    >> that's just another gadget to find a place for. *And I probably
    >> should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    >> keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    >> but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    >> for.

    >
    >> Kate
    >>

    >
    >Actually, good instant-read thermometers are really inexpensive, and
    >accurate.


    And everyone has a handy holster for that gadget. hehe

  4. #4
    Pinstripe Sniper Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >fried chicken!!!!!


    Are you using the 3 qt or the 5 qt?
    http://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-fryers.asp

    I wonder if it could also be used as a flat bottomed wok?

    (Lodge sells a wok too. I would speculate that a 3/16" or even 1/4"
    steel wok would be better. Mainly because you wouldn't have to worry
    about it cracking.
    https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefro...idProduct=3983
    )

    PsS

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    More at http://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com and if that gets banned, check
    www.PinstripeSniper.com

  5. #5
    none of your business Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Apr 19, 3:02*pm, Nancy2 <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote:
    > > that's just another gadget to find a place for. *And I probably
    > > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > > for.
    > > Kate

    >
    > Actually, good instant-read thermometers are really inexpensive, and
    > accurate.
    >
    > N.


    You can get an instant read thermometer at Target for about $10. I
    bought one at Linens and Things about 18 years ago for $10. Once you
    have it, it's always there. Hardly a "gagdet". The only trouble is,
    the dial thermometers only go up to 230 degrees. To use it for deep
    frying, you need to make sure it goes up to 400 degrees. There is one
    at Target thta goes up to 450 deg. That one will cost you $15. Still
    not "expensive" for something you can use every time you cook any type
    of meat or chicken, or bake bread, or make jelly... or fry chicken. If
    you have it 5 years (a conservative estimate), that's $3 a year. Even
    if you only use it 300 days out of the year, that's about a penny per
    use. Not expensive at all for something that will certainly make you a
    better cook.

  6. #6
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 4/19/2010 3:46 PM, Pinstripe Sniper wrote:
    > Kate Connally<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >> my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >> not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >> fried chicken!!!!!

    >
    > Are you using the 3 qt or the 5 qt?
    > http://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-fryers.asp
    >
    > I wonder if it could also be used as a flat bottomed wok?
    >
    > (Lodge sells a wok too. I would speculate that a 3/16" or even 1/4"
    > steel wok would be better. Mainly because you wouldn't have to worry
    > about it cracking.
    > https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefro...idProduct=3983
    > )


    I have a Chinese-made wok that someone gave me for Christmas many
    decades ago. It's relatively thin and assuredly not stainless. Came
    with cleaning instructions--scrub it with a bamboo scrubber that was
    included and if that doesn't get it clean heat it red-hot. No attempt
    to reinvent it seems to work as well.


  7. #7
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 14:18:12 -0400, Kate Connally
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    >hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    >hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    >fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    >that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    >should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    >keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    >but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    >for.
    >
    >And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    >in the quantities you need to fry chicken. And then, unless you
    >make it all the time so that you can reuse the oil several times
    >before you have to throw it out, thus getting your money's worth
    >out of it, well, it's expensive. And then there's the cleaning up.
    >What a pain in the butt.


    Oh My God! If it was such a pain in the ass why did you bother? If
    you're this negative in real life it's no surprise you live alone and
    don't even have your own computer or access.

    Lou

  8. #8
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 2010-04-19 11:18:12 -0700, Kate Connally said:

    > in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    > my SIl got me for Xmas.


    You certainly talked me out of getting one, but can you say what the
    actual model number is?
    --
    If you limit your actions in life to things that nobody can possibly
    find fault with, you will not do much. -- Lewis Carroll


  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    In article <hqi6p8$jt5$[email protected]>,
    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:

    > To go with it I made a roasted potato salad. I had some baby white
    > potatoes which I cut into approximately 8-10 pieces each. I sprayed
    > a baking sheet lined with non-stick foil with olive oil PAM and then
    > spread the potatoes on the sheet, salted and peppered them, and then
    > sprayed the potatoes with the PAM. Baked for about 1/2 hour at 350F
    > until nice and brown. Cooled to just warm to the touch. Meanwhile
    > fried some diced bacon. Also had some shallots left over from something
    > so I chopped them up. Put potatoes in bowl and added diced bacon and
    > shallots. Then I sprinkled on some seasoned salt and added MW and a
    > splash of fake balsamic vinegar and mixed it all up. It was quite
    > tasty.
    >
    > Kate
    >
    > --
    > Kate Connally


    And worth the trouble? :-)

    Sounds good to me, thanks for the post!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  10. #10
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 4/19/2010 8:18 AM, Kate Connally wrote:
    > in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    > my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    > not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    > fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    > hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    > hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    > fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    > that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > for.
    >
    > And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    > in the quantities you need to fry chicken. And then, unless you
    > make it all the time so that you can reuse the oil several times
    > before you have to throw it out, thus getting your money's worth
    > out of it, well, it's expensive. And then there's the cleaning up. What
    > a pain in the butt.
    >
    > So, okay, I made the chicken. (recipe follows) It was okay.
    > I sort of followed a Cook's Country recipe for Extra Crunchy
    > Fried Chicken. It involves "brining" the chicken in buttermilk
    > and salt for 1 hour prior to cooking. The flour has garlic powder,
    > thyme, pepper, and baking powder in it. But you're supposed to add
    > some buttermilk to the flour mixture and rub it in with your fingers to
    > make a mealy consistency. I decided to dispense with that part as too
    > much trouble, besides being just plain weird. I just took the chicken
    > out of the buttermilk and didn't drain it a lot and coated it with
    > the flour. I think it gave me pretty much the same effect as their
    > method.
    >
    > I fried it according to their directions as well as I could, given
    > the thermometer problems. It turned out pretty well. I thought it
    > was a little salty so I would use a lot less salt next time. Also,
    > I thought it was *too* crunchy. But I liked it okay.


    Welcome to the world of fried chicken. I make a pretty good fried
    chicken. :-) To simplify things, I'll use only chicken thighs. The
    thighs are moistened by holding it under the running tap and dredging in
    seasoned flour. The idea of rubbing buttermilk into the flour mixture
    for texture is an interesting one - will try that next time. I like to
    turn the chicken over several times while frying because I think it
    makes for a juicer chicken. I don't use a thermometer, opting for the
    "not too" method of temperature regulation; after browning both sides in
    hot oil, turn the temperature down low but not too low, in the last few
    minutes, finish browning in hotter but not too hot oil. Yeah, it's tasty
    alright. :-)

    >
    > EXTRA-CRUNCHY FRIED CHICKEN
    >
    > 2 c. buttermilk + 6 additional tablespoons
    > 2 T. salt
    > 1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces (~ 3 1/2 lb.)
    > 3 c. flour
    > 2 t. baking powder
    > 1/4 t. thyme
    > 1/2 t. black pepper
    > 1/2 t. garlic powder
    > 4-5 c. vegetable shortening or peanut oil
    >
    > Whisk together 2 c. buttermilk and salt in large bowl until salt is
    > dissolved. Add chicken pieces to bowl and stir to coat; cover bowl with
    > plastic, and refrigerate for 1 hour. (Don’t let chicken soak much longer
    > or it will become too salty.) Whisk flour, baking powder, thyme, pepper,
    > and garlic powder together in large bowl. Add remaining 6 tablespoons
    > buttermilk; with your fingers rub flour and buttermilk together until
    > buttermilk is evenly incorporated into flour and mixture resembles
    > coarse wet sand. Working in batches of two, drop chicken pieces into
    > flour mixture and turn to thoroughly coat, gently pressing flour mixture
    > onto chicken. Shake excess flour from each piece of chicken and transfer
    > to wire rack set over rimmed baking sheet. Heat oil (it should measure
    > 3/4" deep) in large heavy-bottomed Dutch oven with 11" diameter over
    > medium-high heat until it reaches 375F. Place chicken pieces, skin-side
    > down, in oil, cover, and fry until deep golden brown, 8-10 minutes.
    > Remove lid after 4 minutes and lift chicken pieces to check for even
    > browning; rearrange if some pieces are browning faster than others. (At
    > this point, oil should be about 300F. Adjust burner, if necessary, to
    > regulate temperature of oil.) Turn chicken pieces over and continue to
    > fry, uncovered, until chicken pieces are deep golden brown on second
    > side, 6-8 minutes longer. (At this point, to keep chicken from browning
    > too quickly, adjust burner to maintain oil temperature of about 315F.)
    > Using tongs, transfer chicken to plate lined with paper towels; let
    > stand for 5 minutes to drain. Serve. Serves 4. (We wanted to create
    > juicy, rich tasting fried chicken at home without the big mess, and with
    > a crust as crunchy as KFC. Keeping the oil at the correct temperature is
    > essential to producing crunchy fried chicken that is neither too brown
    > nor too greasy. Use a candy/deep-fry thermometer to check the
    > temperature of the oil before you add the chicken. If you cannot find a
    > chicken that weighs 3 1/2 lb. or less, or if you don’t have a pan that
    > is 11" in diameter, you will have to fry the chicken in two batches.
    > Follow the recipe, frying the chicken four pieces at a time and keeping
    > the first batch warm in a 200F oven while the second batch is cooking.
    > From Cook’s Country TV)
    >
    > To go with it I made a roasted potato salad. I had some baby white
    > potatoes which I cut into approximately 8-10 pieces each. I sprayed
    > a baking sheet lined with non-stick foil with olive oil PAM and then
    > spread the potatoes on the sheet, salted and peppered them, and then
    > sprayed the potatoes with the PAM. Baked for about 1/2 hour at 350F
    > until nice and brown. Cooled to just warm to the touch. Meanwhile
    > fried some diced bacon. Also had some shallots left over from something
    > so I chopped them up. Put potatoes in bowl and added diced bacon and
    > shallots. Then I sprinkled on some seasoned salt and added MW and a
    > splash of fake balsamic vinegar and mixed it all up. It was quite
    > tasty.
    >
    > Kate
    >



  11. #11
    Food Snob® Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Apr 20, 3:30*am, dsi1 <d...@spamnet.com> wrote:
    > On 4/19/2010 8:18 AM, Kate Connally wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    > > my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    > > not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    > > fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    > > hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    > > hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    > > fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    > > that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    > > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > > for.

    >
    > > And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    > > in the quantities you need to fry chicken. And then, unless you
    > > make it all the time so that you can reuse the oil several times
    > > before you have to throw it out, thus getting your money's worth
    > > out of it, well, it's expensive. And then there's the cleaning up. What
    > > a pain in the butt.

    >
    > > So, okay, I made the chicken. (recipe follows) It was okay.
    > > I sort of followed a Cook's Country recipe for Extra Crunchy
    > > Fried Chicken. It involves "brining" the chicken in buttermilk
    > > and salt for 1 hour prior to cooking. The flour has garlic powder,
    > > thyme, pepper, and baking powder in it. But you're supposed to add
    > > some buttermilk to the flour mixture and rub it in with your fingers to
    > > make a mealy consistency. I decided to dispense with that part as too
    > > much trouble, besides being just plain weird. I just took the chicken
    > > out of the buttermilk and didn't drain it a lot and coated it with
    > > the flour. I think it gave me pretty much the same effect as their
    > > method.

    >
    > > I fried it according to their directions as well as I could, given
    > > the thermometer problems. It turned out pretty well. I thought it
    > > was a little salty so I would use a lot less salt next time. Also,
    > > I thought it was *too* crunchy. But I liked it okay.

    >
    > Welcome to the world of fried chicken. I make a pretty good fried
    > chicken. :-) To simplify things, I'll use only chicken thighs. The
    > thighs are moistened by holding it under the running tap and dredging in
    > seasoned flour. The idea of rubbing buttermilk into the flour mixture
    > for texture is an interesting one - will try that next time. I like to
    > turn the chicken over several times while frying because I think it
    > makes for a juicer chicken. I don't use a thermometer, opting for the
    > "not too" method of temperature regulation; after browning both sides in
    > hot oil, turn the temperature down low but not too low, in the last few
    > minutes, finish browning in hotter but not too hot oil. Yeah, it's tasty
    > alright. :-)
    >

    Pre-processed thighs are usually pricey. If you buy leg quarters, you
    can often get the thigh and drumsticks both for not much more than the
    thighs alone. That back piece that's on there is great for broth,
    after removing the nasty kidney thingies.
    >
    > > EXTRA-CRUNCHY FRIED CHICKEN

    >
    > > 2 c. buttermilk + 6 additional tablespoons
    > > 2 T. salt
    > > 1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces (~ 3 1/2 lb.)
    > > 3 c. flour
    > > 2 t. baking powder
    > > 1/4 t. thyme
    > > 1/2 t. black pepper
    > > 1/2 t. garlic powder
    > > 4-5 c. vegetable shortening or peanut oil


    Only an idiot would fry in shortening these days. I'm not calling you
    an idiot, you were just too lazy to remove the words from your quoted
    post, but then you openly admit to being lazy.
    >
    > > Kate


    --Bryan

  12. #12
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken


    "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hqi6p8$jt5$[email protected]..
    > in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    > my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    > not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    > fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    > hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    > hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    > fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    > that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > for.
    >
    > And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    > in the quantities you need to fry chicken.

    snip
    You could have 'fried' the chicken instead of deep frying it. Then you
    would have only needed about a half-inch of oil in the pan. Personally, I
    don't like the idea of deep frying on top of the stove where everything can
    be moved and jostled. I'd rather have a dedicated deep fryer that maintains
    its temp.
    Janet



  13. #13
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Apr 20, 8:38*am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > "Kate Connally" <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote in message
    >
    > news:hqi6p8$jt5$[email protected]..> in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    > > my SIl got me for Xmas. *It was much to my chagrin because
    > > not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    > > fried chicken!!!!! *The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    > > hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    > > hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    > > fry stuff! *I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    > > that's just another gadget to find a place for. *And I probably
    > > should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    > > keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    > > but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    > > for.

    >
    > > And then there's buying the oil. *Good oil is expensive, especially
    > > in the quantities you need to fry chicken.

    >
    > * snip
    > You could have 'fried' the chicken instead of deep frying it. *Then you
    > would have only needed about a half-inch of oil in the pan. *Personally, I
    > don't like the idea of deep frying on top of the stove where everything can
    > be moved and jostled. *I'd rather have a dedicated deep fryer that maintains
    > its temp.
    > Janet


    I can pan-fry or even deep fry thin items in my deep 12" square
    electric skillet with temperature control. I put it on top the stove
    (so I can use the exhaust fan) - no problems. I've done everything
    from fried pork tenderloin sandwiches (fairly thin) to hush puppies
    (fairly thick) to Swedish rosettes (cookies).

    N.

  14. #14
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 4/20/2010 2:08 AM, Food Snob® wrote:
    > On Apr 20, 3:30 am, dsi1<d...@spamnet.com> wrote:
    >> On 4/19/2010 8:18 AM, Kate Connally wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >>> my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >>> not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >>> fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    >>> hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    >>> hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    >>> fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    >>> that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    >>> should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    >>> keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    >>> but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    >>> for.

    >>
    >>> And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    >>> in the quantities you need to fry chicken. And then, unless you
    >>> make it all the time so that you can reuse the oil several times
    >>> before you have to throw it out, thus getting your money's worth
    >>> out of it, well, it's expensive. And then there's the cleaning up. What
    >>> a pain in the butt.

    >>
    >>> So, okay, I made the chicken. (recipe follows) It was okay.
    >>> I sort of followed a Cook's Country recipe for Extra Crunchy
    >>> Fried Chicken. It involves "brining" the chicken in buttermilk
    >>> and salt for 1 hour prior to cooking. The flour has garlic powder,
    >>> thyme, pepper, and baking powder in it. But you're supposed to add
    >>> some buttermilk to the flour mixture and rub it in with your fingers to
    >>> make a mealy consistency. I decided to dispense with that part as too
    >>> much trouble, besides being just plain weird. I just took the chicken
    >>> out of the buttermilk and didn't drain it a lot and coated it with
    >>> the flour. I think it gave me pretty much the same effect as their
    >>> method.

    >>
    >>> I fried it according to their directions as well as I could, given
    >>> the thermometer problems. It turned out pretty well. I thought it
    >>> was a little salty so I would use a lot less salt next time. Also,
    >>> I thought it was *too* crunchy. But I liked it okay.

    >>
    >> Welcome to the world of fried chicken. I make a pretty good fried
    >> chicken. :-) To simplify things, I'll use only chicken thighs. The
    >> thighs are moistened by holding it under the running tap and dredging in
    >> seasoned flour. The idea of rubbing buttermilk into the flour mixture
    >> for texture is an interesting one - will try that next time. I like to
    >> turn the chicken over several times while frying because I think it
    >> makes for a juicer chicken. I don't use a thermometer, opting for the
    >> "not too" method of temperature regulation; after browning both sides in
    >> hot oil, turn the temperature down low but not too low, in the last few
    >> minutes, finish browning in hotter but not too hot oil. Yeah, it's tasty
    >> alright. :-)
    >>

    > Pre-processed thighs are usually pricey. If you buy leg quarters, you
    > can often get the thigh and drumsticks both for not much more than the
    > thighs alone. That back piece that's on there is great for broth,
    > after removing the nasty kidney thingies.


    Good advice, I guess. I just stick with the thighs for simplicity in
    cooking i.e., I get to cook all the pieces the same length of time and
    turn them all simultaneously.

    >>
    >>> EXTRA-CRUNCHY FRIED CHICKEN

    >>
    >>> 2 c. buttermilk + 6 additional tablespoons
    >>> 2 T. salt
    >>> 1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces (~ 3 1/2 lb.)
    >>> 3 c. flour
    >>> 2 t. baking powder
    >>> 1/4 t. thyme
    >>> 1/2 t. black pepper
    >>> 1/2 t. garlic powder
    >>> 4-5 c. vegetable shortening or peanut oil

    >
    > Only an idiot would fry in shortening these days. I'm not calling you
    > an idiot, you were just too lazy to remove the words from your quoted
    > post, but then you openly admit to being lazy.


    I don't alter other people's recipes - feel free if that's your thing. I
    prefer to use good clean vegetable oil. Here's a clue for you: a piece
    of chicken cooked in shortening ain't gonna kill you. Try it yourself if
    you don't believe me. :-)

    >>
    >>> Kate

    >
    > --Bryan



  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 4/20/2010 3:38 AM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > "Kate Connally"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:hqi6p8$jt5$[email protected]..
    >> in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >> my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >> not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >> fried chicken!!!!! The thing is, I love fried chicken, but I
    >> hate frying stuff because the oil get all over the place and I
    >> hate cleaning, which is what you have to do a lot of after you
    >> fry stuff! I guess I could get one of those splatter guards but
    >> that's just another gadget to find a place for. And I probably
    >> should get an instant-read thermometer because it was tricky
    >> keeping the oil at the proper temp with just my candy thermometer,
    >> but they are not cheap and, again, another gadget to find a place
    >> for.
    >>
    >> And then there's buying the oil. Good oil is expensive, especially
    >> in the quantities you need to fry chicken.

    > snip
    > You could have 'fried' the chicken instead of deep frying it. Then you
    > would have only needed about a half-inch of oil in the pan. Personally, I
    > don't like the idea of deep frying on top of the stove where everything can
    > be moved and jostled. I'd rather have a dedicated deep fryer that maintains
    > its temp.
    > Janet
    >


    Good point. I completely missed the part about 4 to 5 cups of oil. Only
    a Mr. Bungle would use that amount! Personally, I think using the
    correct amount of oil and frequent turning makes for a juicy chicken. Of
    course, it's important not to overcook the chicken.



  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 08:17:54 -1000, dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Good point. I completely missed the part about 4 to 5 cups of oil. Only
    >a Mr. Bungle would use that amount! Personally, I think using the
    >correct amount of oil and frequent turning makes for a juicy chicken. Of
    >course, it's important not to overcook the chicken.
    >


    I grew up in VA, and we had pan fried chicken at least once a week. I
    don't remember my mother using more than a film of oil in the pan. And
    I don't remember her actually using oil. It was probably Crisco, or
    bacon fat, or a mixture of the two.

    It's odd, cause I helped with frying that chicken most of the time.
    You would have thought it would have sunk in in all those years, as to
    exactly what was done.

    I do remember that it was fried at a fairly high temp for the first
    few minutes, then the heat was turned down and the pan was partially
    covered after that. The chicken was turned fairly often...

    I am still trying to recreate that fried chicken, after leaving home
    over 40 years ago. Have gotten closer, but it has taken trial and
    error to get there. Nowadays, I tend to use a mixture of lard and
    bacon fat and shallow fry/pan fry it. And I find that it needs more
    salt than one suspects. I usually salt and pepper it prior to
    dredging it in flour and these days I sometimes add a bit of smoked
    paprika to the flour. I am still trying to figure out when and if to
    cover the pan... and if I should only partially cover it. Some
    folks recommend covering the pan right away, and cooking with a lower
    temp, then uncovering and raising the temp.

    Christine, who has some chicken thighs that might be calling out to be
    fried.

  17. #17
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On 4/20/2010 8:46 AM, Christine Dabney wrote:
    >
    > I grew up in VA, and we had pan fried chicken at least once a week. I
    > don't remember my mother using more than a film of oil in the pan. And
    > I don't remember her actually using oil. It was probably Crisco, or
    > bacon fat, or a mixture of the two.
    >
    > It's odd, cause I helped with frying that chicken most of the time.
    > You would have thought it would have sunk in in all those years, as to
    > exactly what was done.
    >
    > I do remember that it was fried at a fairly high temp for the first
    > few minutes, then the heat was turned down and the pan was partially
    > covered after that. The chicken was turned fairly often...
    >
    > I am still trying to recreate that fried chicken, after leaving home
    > over 40 years ago. Have gotten closer, but it has taken trial and
    > error to get there. Nowadays, I tend to use a mixture of lard and
    > bacon fat and shallow fry/pan fry it. And I find that it needs more
    > salt than one suspects. I usually salt and pepper it prior to
    > dredging it in flour and these days I sometimes add a bit of smoked
    > paprika to the flour. I am still trying to figure out when and if to
    > cover the pan... and if I should only partially cover it. Some
    > folks recommend covering the pan right away, and cooking with a lower
    > temp, then uncovering and raising the temp.
    >
    > Christine, who has some chicken thighs that might be calling out to be
    > fried.


    I think you're on the right track. Your observation about salt mirrors
    mine. I'll add paprika sometimes too - mostly for color. If I can
    remember, sometimes dehydrated garlic powder and MSG most of the time.
    OTOH, just salt and pepper is tasty too. I can't imagine cooking chicken
    with a small amount of oil. If you're able to do this, I'd be interested
    in how that's done. My guess is she put the chicken in the pan and then
    stuck it in a hot oven. Just kidding. :-)

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 20:55:19 -0400, J. Clarke wrote:

    > On 4/19/2010 3:46 PM, Pinstripe Sniper wrote:
    >> Kate Connally<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> in my new Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron chicken cooker that
    >>> my SIl got me for Xmas. It was much to my chagrin because
    >>> not only does the damn thing weigh 15 lb. but now I have to make
    >>> fried chicken!!!!!

    >>
    >> Are you using the 3 qt or the 5 qt?
    >> http://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-fryers.asp
    >>
    >> I wonder if it could also be used as a flat bottomed wok?
    >>
    >> (Lodge sells a wok too. I would speculate that a 3/16" or even 1/4"
    >> steel wok would be better. Mainly because you wouldn't have to worry
    >> about it cracking.
    >> https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefro...idProduct=3983
    >> )

    >
    > I have a Chinese-made wok that someone gave me for Christmas many
    > decades ago. It's relatively thin and assuredly not stainless. Came
    > with cleaning instructions--scrub it with a bamboo scrubber that was
    > included and if that doesn't get it clean heat it red-hot. No attempt
    > to reinvent it seems to work as well.


    the inscrutable chinese definitely knew what they were about with that one.

    your pal,
    blake

  19. #19
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 09:19:16 -1000, dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think you're on the right track. Your observation about salt mirrors
    >mine. I'll add paprika sometimes too - mostly for color. If I can
    >remember, sometimes dehydrated garlic powder and MSG most of the time.
    >OTOH, just salt and pepper is tasty too. I can't imagine cooking chicken
    >with a small amount of oil. If you're able to do this, I'd be interested
    >in how that's done.


    Oh, it is very common in the South and other places to shallow fry/pan
    fry chicken. Probably more common than deep frying... It doesn't
    take that much, really.

    Christine

  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: I finally made fried chicken

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > paprika to the flour. I am still trying to figure out when and if to
    > cover the pan... and if I should only partially cover it.


    Some people like crispy fried chicken; Mom used to cover it after it was
    all browned. Covering it kept the moisture and steam inside the roaster
    so the breading was soft. I like it that way but haven't fixed it that
    way in probaly 40 years.
    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Updated 4-11-2010

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