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Thread: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

  1. #1
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.

    John Kuthe...

  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Oct 31, 10:35*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    >


    Fish is a common breakfast in Asia, and salt fish is a common
    breakfast in the UK.


  3. #3
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Oct 31, 10:35*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    My folks and I ate a lot of freshwater fish we caught when I lived in
    Nebraska. Bass, trout, walleye, crappie, bullhead, catfish. It was
    very common to have fish for breakfast.

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 10/31/2011 1:49 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Oct 31, 10:35 am, John Kuthe<johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    >> So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    >>

    >
    > Fish is a common breakfast in Asia, and salt fish is a common
    > breakfast in the UK.
    >

    All I remember of British fish breakfasts in my childhood is Finnan
    Haddie (smoked haddock) and kippers. I can't say I really liked either
    in the morning. I believe salt cod was common before refrigeration but
    I mainly associate it with Portugal: Bacalao, I think. Salted herring
    was eaten too in Britain I can't remember any salt fish at all at
    breakfast.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  5. #5
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Oct 31, 11:04*am, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 31, 10:35*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.

    >
    > > John Kuthe...

    >
    > My folks and I ate a lot of freshwater fish we caught when I lived in
    > Nebraska. Bass, trout, walleye, crappie, bullhead, catfish. It was
    > very common to have fish for breakfast.


    The best camping breakfast is trout straight out of the stream and
    into the frying pan.

    In old school places in Hawaii, you can get fish and eggs.

    Susan B.

  6. #6
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Oct 31, 11:48*am, James Silverton <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    wrote:
    > On 10/31/2011 1:49 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:> On Oct 31, 10:35 am, John Kuthe<johnkuth...@gmail.com> *wrote:
    > >> In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > >> So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.

    >
    > > Fish is a common breakfast in Asia, and salt fish is a common
    > > breakfast in the UK.

    >
    > All I remember of British fish breakfasts in my childhood is Finnan
    > Haddie (smoked haddock) and kippers. I can't say I really liked either
    > in the morning. *I believe salt cod was common before refrigeration but
    > I mainly associate it with Portugal: Bacalao, I think. Salted herring
    > was eaten too in Britain *I can't remember any salt fish at all at
    > breakfast.
    >


    Huh?

    Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.

    http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf

    http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700

  7. #7
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 10/31/2011 3:06 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Oct 31, 11:48 am, James Silverton<not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    > wrote:
    >> On 10/31/2011 1:49 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:> On Oct 31, 10:35 am, John Kuthe<johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>> In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    >>>> So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.

    >>
    >>> Fish is a common breakfast in Asia, and salt fish is a common
    >>> breakfast in the UK.

    >>
    >> All I remember of British fish breakfasts in my childhood is Finnan
    >> Haddie (smoked haddock) and kippers. I can't say I really liked either
    >> in the morning. I believe salt cod was common before refrigeration but
    >> I mainly associate it with Portugal: Bacalao, I think. Salted herring
    >> was eaten too in Britain I can't remember any salt fish at all at
    >> breakfast.
    >>

    >
    > Huh?
    >
    > Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    > fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.
    >
    > http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf
    >
    > http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700


    I don't recall either being very salty and I'm pretty sure Finnan Haddie
    is not salted.
    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:35:35 -0700 (PDT), John Kuthe
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    >


    <suspicious look> Was it fried?


    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:04:04 -0700 (PDT), Chemo the Clown
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 31, 10:35*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    > > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    > >
    > > John Kuthe...

    >
    > My folks and I ate a lot of freshwater fish we caught when I lived in
    > Nebraska. Bass, trout, walleye, crappie, bullhead, catfish. It was
    > very common to have fish for breakfast.


    You just reminded me that trout for breakfast used to be a big deal
    camping. Whatever happened to trout in the grocery store? I remember
    being able to buy rainbow trout. Husband loved trout, me not so
    much... too bony for me.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  10. #10
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 10/31/2011 1:06 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    > fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.
    >
    > http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf
    >
    > http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700



    Brining and salting are not the same thing. When something is "salted
    away," it is packed in salt and put up to dehydrate. It will thus be
    preserved. That is salting. Brining is just a seasoning trick, not meant
    as a method of preservation.

  11. #11
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 12:22:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:04:04 -0700 (PDT), Chemo the Clown
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Oct 31, 10:35*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> > In TN there was a guy who sold catfish for breakfast, and I loved it!
    >> > So did he. His wife thought he was crazy.
    >> >
    >> > John Kuthe...

    >>
    >> My folks and I ate a lot of freshwater fish we caught when I lived in
    >> Nebraska. Bass, trout, walleye, crappie, bullhead, catfish. It was
    >> very common to have fish for breakfast.

    >
    >You just reminded me that trout for breakfast used to be a big deal
    >camping. Whatever happened to trout in the grocery store? I remember
    >being able to buy rainbow trout. Husband loved trout, me not so
    >much... too bony for me.


    It's just beginning to show up here. I live in the state that has the
    largest trout farms in the country and you would think we would be
    able to get them all year long. We used to be able to. But recently
    Costco tells me they only carry them in the winter and I notice that
    Winco doesn't carry them during the summer.
    Janet US

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 31/10/2011 3:11 PM, James Silverton wrote:

    >> Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    >> fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.
    >>
    >> http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf
    >>
    >>
    >> http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700

    >
    > I don't recall either being very salty and I'm pretty sure Finnan Haddie
    > is not salted.


    I believe they are salted and then smoked.

  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 13:44:53 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It's just beginning to show up here. I live in the state that has the
    > largest trout farms in the country and you would think we would be
    > able to get them all year long. We used to be able to. But recently
    > Costco tells me they only carry them in the winter and I notice that
    > Winco doesn't carry them during the summer.


    Trout used to be a popular item on restaurant menus too. My husband
    mostly got it when we ate out... he flip flopped between sand dabs and
    trout. That was back in the days when the waiters boned your fish at
    the table, but I doubt anyone would know how to do it these days.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 31/10/2011 3:22 PM, sf wrote:

    > You just reminded me that trout for breakfast used to be a big deal
    > camping. Whatever happened to trout in the grocery store?


    I remember years ago being able to buy boxes of small frozen rainbow
    trout. I haven't seen them in years. I can now buy them fresh, but they
    are a lot bigger and are sold either whole or filleted.

    > I remember
    > being able to buy rainbow trout. Husband loved trout, me not so
    > much... too bony for me.
    >


    Trout..... bony? Not in my experience. Once cooked the flesh usually
    slides easily off the bone.


  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 31/10/2011 3:28 PM, Pennyaline wrote:
    > On 10/31/2011 1:06 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >> Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    >> fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.
    >>
    >> http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf
    >>
    >>
    >> http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700

    >
    >
    > Brining and salting are not the same thing. When something is "salted
    > away," it is packed in salt and put up to dehydrate. It will thus be
    > preserved. That is salting. Brining is just a seasoning trick, not meant
    > as a method of preservation.


    Smoked fish is usually salted and brined before smoking.

  16. #16
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 31/10/2011 3:44 PM, Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > It's just beginning to show up here. I live in the state that has the
    > largest trout farms in the country and you would think we would be
    > able to get them all year long. We used to be able to. But recently
    > Costco tells me they only carry them in the winter and I notice that
    > Winco doesn't carry them during the summer.



    IMO, trout tastes better when it comes from cold water. I usually notice
    a muddy taste in trout from warm water.



  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:37:16 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 31/10/2011 3:22 PM, sf wrote:
    >
    > > You just reminded me that trout for breakfast used to be a big deal
    > > camping. Whatever happened to trout in the grocery store?

    >
    > I remember years ago being able to buy boxes of small frozen rainbow
    > trout. I haven't seen them in years. I can now buy them fresh, but they
    > are a lot bigger and are sold either whole or filleted.
    >
    > > I remember
    > > being able to buy rainbow trout. Husband loved trout, me not so
    > > much... too bony for me.
    > >

    >
    > Trout..... bony? Not in my experience. Once cooked the flesh usually
    > slides easily off the bone.


    If it still has the spine when it's cooked, it's bony and there's
    always the one that gets away. Bony. Good fish for Halloween though.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  18. #18
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 10/31/2011 2:37 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > On 31/10/2011 3:28 PM, Pennyaline wrote:
    >> On 10/31/2011 1:06 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >>> Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    >>> fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...n%20Haddie.pdf
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700

    >>
    >>
    >> Brining and salting are not the same thing. When something is "salted
    >> away," it is packed in salt and put up to dehydrate. It will thus be
    >> preserved. That is salting. Brining is just a seasoning trick, not meant
    >> as a method of preservation.

    >
    > Smoked fish is usually salted and brined before smoking.



    They are seasoned with salt or brine, but not salt packed.

  19. #19
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On 31/10/2011 4:42 PM, sf wrote:

    >>
    >> Trout..... bony? Not in my experience. Once cooked the flesh usually
    >> slides easily off the bone.

    >
    > If it still has the spine when it's cooked, it's bony and there's
    > always the one that gets away. Bony. Good fish for Halloween though.
    >


    I find that if I use a fork along the lateral line to hold the fish
    steady and use a knife to slide the flesh away from the spine, it slips
    away with no bones at all in the flesh. It is a lot easier to deal with
    than salmon steaks.

  20. #20
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: I ate a Straub's trout for breakfast

    On Oct 31, 12:28*pm, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.huh>
    wrote:
    > On 10/31/2011 1:06 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >
    > > Finnan haddie is prepared by brining and smoking, as are kippers. The
    > > fish absorb salt from the brine -- voila salt fish.

    >
    > >http://www.delmarlearning.com/compan...9654/student/R...

    >
    > >http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=1700

    >
    > Brining and salting are not the same thing. When something is "salted
    > away," it is packed in salt and put up to dehydrate. It will thus be
    > preserved. That is salting. Brining is just a seasoning trick, not meant
    > as a method of preservation.


    You thought I meant baccala. I did not mean baccala. I meant unfresh
    fish; fish preserved with salt.

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