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Thread: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    found in kitchens nonetheless! [Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    one.]

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  2. #2
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 5, 10:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"


    ==================================

    Due to the gol dang Lipitor I take so I can keep eatiing at least a
    little butter etc. I have a grapefruit knife that isn't getting any
    use. It's one of those two ended things a wicked scythe-like serrated
    on both sides curved knife on one end which carves the grapefruit half
    away from the rind and on the other end a double tined thing with
    about an eighth of an inch opening between the serrated tines for
    cutting the fruit section away from the membrane, Any one have an
    alternate use for this thing?

    Lynn in Fargo
    Sorry no digital camera to post picture from Fargo



  3. #3
    anonymousNetUser Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! [Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]


    Why remove the seeds? There's so much tomato flavor in the "jelly"
    around the seeds!

    Alton Brown would be proud of you: You discovered a "multi-taker" tool.

  4. #4
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    anonymousNetUser wrote:

    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    >> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    >> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    >> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    >> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    >> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    >> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    >> found in kitchens nonetheless! [Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    >> one.]

    >
    > Why remove the seeds? There's so much tomato flavor in the "jelly"
    > around the seeds!


    I've never removed a tomato seed in my life, so I wondered about that,
    too. Sure, some of them and some of the snot doesn't make it into the
    product, but that's not because I've actively *removed* them. Perhaps
    we just haven't hit upon certain dishes that require them to be removed.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  5. #5
    Dragonblaze Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 6, 4:29*am, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]


    I use a sharp cheese knife to prep my chillies. The curved blunt tip
    is perfect for de-seeding them.

    Regards,

    Dragonblaze

  6. #6
    Billy Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Tue, 05 Aug 2008 20:29:44 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm sure there are a variety of
    >kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for


    A metal shoe horn is perfect for removing kernels of corn from the
    cob. The rounded shape "fits" the cob.


  7. #7
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 5, 10:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"


    I have one grapefruit spoon in the drawer which I kept from an old,
    cheap stainless set - I use it only for deseeding cucumbers. It's
    perfect for that. I have a strawberry huller, metal, which I love.
    It's just like the one my grandma had. And I just squeeze tomatoes to
    get the seeds out, but usually I just leave them in.

    N.

  8. #8
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 5, 10:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"


    I use a wire-type pastry cutter to chop hard-boiled eggs for egg
    salad. Perfect.

    N.

  9. #9
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    anonymousNetUser wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    >> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    >> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    >> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    >> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    >> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    >> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    >> found in kitchens nonetheless! [Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    >> one.]

    >
    > Why remove the seeds? There's so much tomato flavor in the "jelly"
    > around the seeds!
    >
    > Alton Brown would be proud of you: You discovered a "multi-taker" tool.


    You mean "multi-tasker."

    And yes, Alton Brown would be proud... proud that you watch his show. He
    uses grapefruit spoons the same way.

  10. #10
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 5, 11:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > one.]


    I've found my wok is very handy for removing the snow from the
    balcony. And the chinese cleaver is any for chopping up small trees
    for fires and also for chopping vines down.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  11. #11
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    John Kane <[email protected]> wrote in news:8d8d2aa8-9fea-40c0-90f3-
    [email protected]:

    > On Aug 5, 11:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    >> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    >> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    >> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    >> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    >> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    >> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    >> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    >> found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    >> one.]

    >
    > I've found my wok is very handy for removing the snow from the
    > balcony. And the chinese cleaver is any for chopping up small trees
    > for fires and also for chopping vines down.
    >
    > John Kane Kingston ON Canada
    >


    Funny you mention it...I was just considering using my medium swiss
    cleaver on a log for the smoker. As my hatchet has gone astray.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  12. #12
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    Pennyaline wrote:

    >> Alton Brown would be proud of you: You discovered a "multi-taker" tool.

    >
    > You mean "multi-tasker."
    >
    > And yes, Alton Brown would be proud... proud that you watch his show. He
    > uses grapefruit spoons the same way.


    what a coincidence! I just saw him advocate this trick just this week.
    He did a good show about tomatoes.
    I love AB*

  13. #13
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Wed, 06 Aug 2008 18:33:49 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Kane <[email protected]> wrote in news:8d8d2aa8-9fea-40c0-90f3-
    >[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Aug 5, 11:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    >>> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    >>> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    >>> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    >>> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    >>> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    >>> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    >>> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    >>> found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    >>> one.]

    >>
    >> I've found my wok is very handy for removing the snow from the
    >> balcony. And the chinese cleaver is any for chopping up small trees
    >> for fires and also for chopping vines down.
    >>
    >> John Kane Kingston ON Canada
    >>

    >
    >Funny you mention it...I was just considering using my medium swiss
    >cleaver on a log for the smoker. As my hatchet has gone astray.


    Yep. That makes sense. Destroy your cleaver instead of looking for
    your hatchet.

    Lou

  14. #14
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon


    On 5-Aug-2008, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > addition to the jobs they *are* used for


    For hulling strawberries, I use a straw - just a plain old drinking straw.
    I center the straw on the bottom of the strawberry and push up; when the
    straw hits the top of the berry, having removed the core completely, it
    pushes the hull off. Works for all but the very smallest strawberries. I
    just leave the core in the straw; each subsequent core pushes the previous
    further into the straw; after about 9-10 berries, the cores just push out of
    the bottom of the straw as new ones come in the top and fall in the "garbage
    bowl" I pitch the hulls in.

    I reckon that's why they are strawberries ;-)

    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  15. #15
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon


    Lou Decruss wrote:

    > On Wed, 06 Aug 2008 18:33:49 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >John Kane <[email protected]> wrote in news:8d8d2aa8-9fea-40c0-90f3-
    > >[email protected]:
    > >
    > >> On Aug 5, 11:29 pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > >>> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > >>> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > >>> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > >>> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > >>> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > >>> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > >>> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > >>> found in kitchens nonetheless! [Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > >>> one.]
    > >>
    > >> I've found my wok is very handy for removing the snow from the
    > >> balcony. And the chinese cleaver is any for chopping up small trees
    > >> for fires and also for chopping vines down.
    > >>
    > >> John Kane Kingston ON Canada
    > >>

    > >
    > >Funny you mention it...I was just considering using my medium swiss
    > >cleaver on a log for the smoker. As my hatchet has gone astray.

    >
    > Yep. That makes sense. Destroy your cleaver instead of looking for
    > your hatchet.



    :-)

    Hey Lou, did you survive our recent storms okay...???


    --
    Best
    Greg



  16. #16
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    l, not -l wrote:

    > For hulling strawberries, I use a straw - just a plain old drinking straw.
    > I center the straw on the bottom of the strawberry and push up; when the
    > straw hits the top of the berry, having removed the core completely, it
    > pushes the hull off. Works for all but the very smallest strawberries. I
    > just leave the core in the straw; each subsequent core pushes the previous
    > further into the straw; after about 9-10 berries, the cores just push out of
    > the bottom of the straw as new ones come in the top and fall in the "garbage
    > bowl" I pitch the hulls in.



    Brilliant!! I've never heard of this trick before and will try it next
    time I have some berries to hull.
    Thanks!

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Wed 06 Aug 2008 01:54:38p, Goomba told us...

    > l, not -l wrote:
    >
    >> For hulling strawberries, I use a straw - just a plain old drinking
    >> straw. I center the straw on the bottom of the strawberry and push up;
    >> when the straw hits the top of the berry, having removed the core
    >> completely, it pushes the hull off. Works for all but the very
    >> smallest strawberries. I just leave the core in the straw; each
    >> subsequent core pushes the previous further into the straw; after about
    >> 9-10 berries, the cores just push out of the bottom of the straw as new
    >> ones come in the top and fall in the "garbage bowl" I pitch the hulls
    >> in.

    >
    >
    > Brilliant!! I've never heard of this trick before and will try it next
    > time I have some berries to hull.
    > Thanks!
    >


    I say! That is a great idea!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 08(VIII)/06(VI)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    Ah yes! I remember it well!
    -------------------------------------------





  18. #18
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Aug 6, 2:33*pm, hahabogus <inva...@null.null> wrote:
    > John Kane <jrkrid...@gmail.com> wrote in news:8d8d2aa8-9fea-40c0-90f3-
    > 89067c93d...@56g2000hsm.googlegroups.com:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Aug 5, 11:29*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > >> I was prepping some tomatoes by slicing them in half and removing the
    > >> seeds using my favorite tomato de-seeding tool: a grapefruit spoon. It
    > >> does a great job of a couple of kitchen chores such as de-seeding
    > >> tomatoes and hulling strawberries. I'm sure there are a variety of
    > >> kitchen tools that weren't designed for the jobs they get used for in
    > >> addition to the jobs they *are* used for - not to mention a variety of
    > >> tools that weren't designed to get anywhere near a kitchen, but can be
    > >> found in kitchens nonetheless! *[Blame Alan a/k/a hahabogus for this
    > >> one.]

    >
    > > I've found my wok is very handy for removing the snow from the
    > > balcony. *And the chinese cleaver is any for chopping up small trees
    > > for fires and also for chopping vines down.

    >
    > > John Kane Kingston ON Canada

    >
    > Funny you mention it...I was just considering using my medium swiss
    > cleaver on a log for the smoker. As my hatchet has gone astray.


    I'v never tried Western-style cleaver but I don't see why it would
    not work. There's not that much difference between a Western-style
    cleaver and a hatchet. I used the Chinese cleaver to cut up wood but
    I don't think it has enough weight for splitting wood but if you think
    a hatchet will work maybe my cleaver would too. I tend to think of
    six - 10 inch pieces of Maple for splitting.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  19. #19
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon


    On 6-Aug-2008, Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > l, not -l wrote:
    >
    > > For hulling strawberries, I use a straw - just a plain old drinking
    > > straw.
    > > I center the straw on the bottom of the strawberry and push up; when the
    > > straw hits the top of the berry, having removed the core completely, it
    > > pushes the hull off. Works for all but the very smallest strawberries.
    > > I
    > > just leave the core in the straw; each subsequent core pushes the
    > > previous
    > > further into the straw; after about 9-10 berries, the cores just push
    > > out of
    > > the bottom of the straw as new ones come in the top and fall in the
    > > "garbage
    > > bowl" I pitch the hulls in.

    >
    >
    > Brilliant!! I've never heard of this trick before and will try it next
    > time I have some berries to hull.
    > Thanks!


    I don't do it often; but, the hole through the berry is great for stuffing.
    Mix a little cream cheese, milk/cream and powdered sugar and pipe it into
    the hole. A bit of warmed "hot fudge" piped in; overfill and let it run
    down the sides a bit; when chilled it can be finger food that delivers berry
    and chocolate in one burst.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  20. #20
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: The Humble Grapefruit Spoon

    On Wed 06 Aug 2008 02:33:58p, l, not -l told us...

    >
    > On 6-Aug-2008, Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> l, not -l wrote:
    >>
    >> > For hulling strawberries, I use a straw - just a plain old drinking
    >> > straw. I center the straw on the bottom of the strawberry and push
    >> > up; when the straw hits the top of the berry, having removed the core
    >> > completely, it pushes the hull off. Works for all but the very
    >> > smallest strawberries. I
    >> > just leave the core in the straw; each subsequent core pushes the
    >> > previous further into the straw; after about 9-10 berries, the cores
    >> > just push out of
    >> > the bottom of the straw as new ones come in the top and fall in the
    >> > "garbage bowl" I pitch the hulls in.

    >>
    >>
    >> Brilliant!! I've never heard of this trick before and will try it next
    >> time I have some berries to hull.
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > I don't do it often; but, the hole through the berry is great for
    > stuffing. Mix a little cream cheese, milk/cream and powdered sugar and
    > pipe it into the hole. A bit of warmed "hot fudge" piped in; overfill
    > and let it run down the sides a bit; when chilled it can be finger food
    > that delivers berry and chocolate in one burst.


    That would be good!

    There used to be a mom and pop candy shop in Ohio that specialized in
    chocolate coated fresh fruit. Typically they had chocolate covered
    strawberries, red raspberry clusters, and pitted bing cherries. It was
    always a treat to stop in there. Sadly, the place burned down a few years
    ago.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 08(VIII)/06(VI)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    If you're happy and you know it clunk
    your chains.
    -------------------------------------------




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