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Thread: How slow is slow cooking?

  1. #1
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default How slow is slow cooking?

    I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. But I've found various
    things on the web that are discouraging me. I'd like information from
    people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    see if it's practical.

    Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    something I'm willing to do. However, refrigerating the loaded
    container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    it into the container in the morning, are possible.

    So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    will it be burned / overcooked? (There might, sometimes, be a
    possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On Feb 23, 10:37*am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    > things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    > people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    > see if it's practical.
    >
    > Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    > through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    > something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    > container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    > it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >
    > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    > possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    > refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    > my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)


    I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    enough to burn when set to slow. But I only ever use them for soups
    and stews -- I've never tried to cook food dry in them. The lids have
    been heavy enough to fit tightly enough so that all the moisture
    inside stays inside.

    When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    for up to 24 hours.

  3. #3
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Feb 23, 10:37*am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    >> things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    >> people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    >> see if it's practical.
    >>
    >> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    >> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    >> something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    >> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    >> it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >>
    >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >> will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    >> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    >> refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    >> my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)

    >
    > I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    > enough to burn when set to slow. But I only ever use them for soups
    > and stews -- I've never tried to cook food dry in them. The lids have
    > been heavy enough to fit tightly enough so that all the moisture
    > inside stays inside.
    >
    > When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    > for up to 24 hours.


    Thanks, that's useful. I envisioned wet things generally, soups and
    stews as you mentioned, and pot-roasts. So, sounding hopeful. (I don't
    have to be able to do *any crockpor recipe*; I just have to be able to
    use enough to be interesting, and to be able to tell which are which.)
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  4. #4
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On Feb 23, 10:37*am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    > things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    > people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    > see if it's practical.
    >
    > Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    > through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    > something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    > container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    > it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >
    > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    > possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    > refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    > my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)
    > --
    > David Dyer-Bennet, d...@dd-b.net;http://dd-b.net/
    > Snapshots:http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    > Photos:http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    > Dragaera:http://dragaera.info


    Do you have a newer model crock pot? I know mine runs pretty hot, so I
    use the warm setting for the low temp cooking. I think it would be a
    good idea to test it out on a day off so you can see how yours cooks.

  5. #5
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    merryb <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Feb 23, 10:37*am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    >> things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    >> people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    >> see if it's practical.
    >>
    >> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    >> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    >> something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    >> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    >> it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >>
    >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >> will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    >> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    >> refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    >> my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)


    > Do you have a newer model crock pot? I know mine runs pretty hot, so I
    > use the warm setting for the low temp cooking. I think it would be a
    > good idea to test it out on a day off so you can see how yours cooks.


    Haven't got one at all; so if I decide one is useful, I'll presumably
    have a very new model crock pot after I buy one :-). One thing I read
    is that newer ones run hotter and don't work as well for actual long
    cooking times, that's part of why I'm asking here (for people with
    actual experience).

    Yes, performing early experiments under more controlled conditions until
    I know how it behaves is a good precaution. I'm hoping not to waste
    money buying one I decide isn't useful, though, if I can.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  6. #6
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >
    > When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    > for up to 24 hours.


    To make ultimate stock, it's usually best to let it simmer for 24 hours,
    imo.

    gary

  7. #7
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >
    > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful.
    >
    > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > will it be burned / overcooked?


    No...you're good with it. Not all meals but most, you can put it in during
    the morning and come home to a nice smelling house. No over cooking issues
    with most things.

    Gary

  8. #8
    Michelle Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On Feb 23, 2:33*pm, Gary <g.maj...@att.net> wrote:
    > David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >
    > > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful.

    >
    > > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    > > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > > will it be burned / overcooked?

    >
    > No...you're good with it. *Not all meals but most, you can put it in during
    > the morning and come home to a nice smelling house. *No over cooking issues
    > with most things.
    >
    > Gary


    My crock pot has the ability to cook on on low for 8 or 10 hours (you
    choose) and then switch to warm for up to 4 hours before it switches
    off. I found that new crock pots do run hotter, so 8 hours is plenty
    for a pot roast (I usually let beans cook for 10)- and the switch to
    warm keeps everything so you still have a hot meal whe you get home,
    but it's not over cooked.

    I sometimes load the crock the night before and refrigerate, and
    sometimes put everything in a bowl and dump it in the crock in the
    morning (mostly depends on fridge space) - no problems there.

  9. #9
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    Gary <[email protected]> writes:

    > David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >>
    >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful.
    >>
    >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >> will it be burned / overcooked?

    >
    > No...you're good with it. Not all meals but most, you can put it in during
    > the morning and come home to a nice smelling house. No over cooking issues
    > with most things.


    Thanks. Doesn't have to be for "all", I just need enough to be useful,
    worth having the crockpot around. So, several people saying it's going
    to be workable for significant numbers of recipes. Okay!
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  10. #10
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    Michelle <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Feb 23, 2:33*pm, Gary <g.maj...@att.net> wrote:
    >> David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >>
    >> > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful.

    >>
    >> > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    >> > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >> > will it be burned / overcooked?

    >>
    >> No...you're good with it. *Not all meals but most, you can put it in during
    >> the morning and come home to a nice smelling house. *No over cooking issues
    >> with most things.

    >
    > My crock pot has the ability to cook on on low for 8 or 10 hours (you
    > choose) and then switch to warm for up to 4 hours before it switches
    > off. I found that new crock pots do run hotter, so 8 hours is plenty
    > for a pot roast (I usually let beans cook for 10)- and the switch to
    > warm keeps everything so you still have a hot meal whe you get home,
    > but it's not over cooked.


    I can see the utility (but also extra complexity). (The other reason to
    keep warm is to keep it above 140, I imagine, up in the safe zone.)

    > I sometimes load the crock the night before and refrigerate, and
    > sometimes put everything in a bowl and dump it in the crock in the
    > morning (mostly depends on fridge space) - no problems there.


    Good, thanks.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On 2/23/2012 12:42 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:

    > I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    > enough to burn when set to slow.



    Don't buy a Rival brand. Mine boiled food on "warm" I pitched it and
    bought a Hamilton Beach. Much more reliable.


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    >
    >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    >> things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    >> people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    >> see if it's practical.
    >>
    >> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    >> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    >> something I'm willing to do.


    There's another thread that discusses assembling the ingredients the
    night before and pulling the crockpot out of the fridge in the morning,
    putting it into the heater unit and turing it on. To me that's standard
    procedure for a crockpot.

    >> However, refrigerating the loaded
    >> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    >> it into the container in the morning, are possible.

    >
    >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >> will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    >> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    >> refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    >> my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)


    That's esactly what a crok pot is for. When chosing the right tool for
    the job you just did a bullseye pointing you to getitng a crockpot.

    > I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    > enough to burn when set to slow. But I only ever use them for soups
    > and stews -- I've never tried to cook food dry in them. The lids have
    > been heavy enough to fit tightly enough so that all the moisture
    > inside stays inside.


    The make anything dry you need to remove the cover. Because of the heat
    lost to evaporation it won't cook with the cover off. Thus to make any
    dry recipe it needs to cook wet with the cover first. Then remove the
    cover later. An hour is rarely enough to matter so that's not practical
    for meals during the week but I have done it on the weekend.

    > When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    > for up to 24 hours.


    In my experience the simmer of a crockpot is too low to make good broth.
    To me a good broth is one that bubbled slowly down. I've made broth in
    the crockpot but not good broth.

    When making beans I've left them in the crockpot for in excess of 24
    hours. I've had beans that were okay for dinner that day then better
    for dinner the next day. I have not tried that without other foods.

  13. #13
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On Feb 23, 1:37*pm, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    > I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    > things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    > people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    > see if it's practical.
    >
    > Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    > through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    > something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    > container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    > it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >
    > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    > possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    > refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    > my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)
    > --
    > David Dyer-Bennet, d...@dd-b.net;http://dd-b.net/
    > Snapshots:http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    > Photos:http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    > Dragaera:http://dragaera.info


    Some recipes can be let go on low for about 6 hours. That said, I
    STILL wanna be home when it's going. What if you didn't make it home
    on time? I always worry about stuff like that. I guess one could rig
    a timer just in case.

    As I type, I have a crockpot meal going. I call it a 'nap' meal - I
    can take a nice nap, knowing supper's cookin'. . It's really a
    stressbuster for me.

    With your schedule, I'd prep the stuff the night before, store in
    fridge, dump it in in the mornin' and head out for the day. Try it.






  14. #14
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On Feb 23, 3:23*pm, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    > merryb <msg...@juno.com> writes:
    > > On Feb 23, 10:37*am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    > >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. *But I've found various
    > >> things on the web that are discouraging me. *I'd like information from
    > >> people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    > >> see if it's practical.

    >
    > >> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    > >> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    > >> something I'm willing to do. *However, refrigerating the loaded
    > >> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    > >> it into the container in the morning, are possible.

    >
    > >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? *If
    > >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > >> will it be burned / overcooked? *(There might, sometimes, be a
    > >> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    > >> refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    > >> my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)

    > > Do you have a newer model crock pot? I know mine runs pretty hot, so I
    > > use the warm setting for the low temp cooking. I think it would be a
    > > good idea to test it out on a day off so you can see how yours cooks.

    >
    > Haven't got one at all; so if I decide one is useful, I'll presumably
    > have a very new model crock pot after I buy one :-). * One thing I read
    > is that newer ones run hotter and don't work as well for actual long
    > cooking times, that's part of why I'm asking here (for people with
    > actual experience).
    >
    > Yes, performing early experiments under more controlled conditions until
    > I know how it behaves is a good precaution. *I'm hoping not to waste
    > money buying one I decide isn't useful, though, if I can.
    > --
    > David Dyer-Bennet, d...@dd-b.net;http://dd-b.net/
    > Snapshots:http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    > Photos:http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    > Dragaera:http://dragaera.info


    Spend the extra bucks and get one with the removable liner. Mine is
    an oldie and I have to fill it and let er soak a while. You might
    also try oiling the interior a bit to prevent stuck on food.

  15. #15
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?


    "David Dyer-Bennet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. But I've found various
    > things on the web that are discouraging me. I'd like information from
    > people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    > see if it's practical.
    >
    > Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    > through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    > something I'm willing to do. However, refrigerating the loaded
    > container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    > it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >
    > So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    > I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    > will it be burned / overcooked? (There might, sometimes, be a
    > possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    > refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    > my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)


    The newer crockpots tend to get hotter than the old ones so they cook
    faster.

    I can foresee a few problems with your situation. One is that many recipes
    require you to use the pot on high for an hour then turn down the heat. So
    you'd need to be home to do that.

    Also most recipes cook for 6-8 hours. You're going to be gone for longer
    than that.

    You can prepare the food early. You can't put it in the crock and then put
    the crock in the crockpot straight from the fridge. You would have to put
    the food in something else and then transfer to the room temp. crock. After
    the food is cooked, it can be stored in the crock. But you don't want to
    heat a cold crock because that would crack it.

    The thing I would probably do if I were you would be to cook the food when
    you get home from work. Let it cook all night. Then in the morning, put it
    in the fridge. Yes, you will have to reheat it later but at least it will
    be cooked! Technically you can put the lidded crock right in the fridge but
    from a food safety standpoint that might not be good. Might take too long
    to cool down. So you should probably put the hot food in another container.

    Some things still might work with your hours. Like vegetable soup or baked
    beans. They can cook for a very long time with no problems. The issue with
    a crock pot is not so much that it will dry out, but just the opposite. It
    will turn to mush if cooked for too long. I have done enchilada casserole
    in there and it can stay for 2 hours, max! Any longer and the tortillas
    just dissolve into it. The flavor is good but the end result is mush. I
    have done wild and brown rice in there and it was fine. But white rice and
    pasta may turn to mush when cooked for that long. Meat will be very tender.
    But perhaps more tender than you want. I have cooked a beef roast for too
    long and was unable to slice it. It just fell apart. Which wasn't actually
    a problem for us because we like it that way. But the carrots had turned to
    mush.



  16. #16
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Feb 23, 10:37 am, David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    >> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. But I've found
    >> various things on the web that are discouraging me. I'd like
    >> information from people doing something like what I want to do, with
    >> recent cookers, to see if it's practical.
    >>
    >> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    >> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    >> something I'm willing to do. However, refrigerating the loaded
    >> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and
    >> loading it into the container in the morning, are possible.
    >>
    >> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    >> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at
    >> night, will it be burned / overcooked? (There might, sometimes, be a
    >> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from
    >> the refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day,
    >> but that's my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go
    >> wrong.)

    >
    > I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    > enough to burn when set to slow. But I only ever use them for soups
    > and stews -- I've never tried to cook food dry in them. The lids have
    > been heavy enough to fit tightly enough so that all the moisture
    > inside stays inside.
    >
    > When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    > for up to 24 hours.


    You can't cook food dry in one. Unless perhaps you just put meat in there
    with no liquid whatever. Yes, you do need a little liquid. But you do need
    a lot less than you would need for stovetop or oven cooking. Because the
    lid seals so tightly, the liquid stays in. I have made the mistake of
    adding liquid to baked beans, fearing they would dry up. Wrong thing to do
    because they got soupy. I then had to ladle out the liquid and cook it
    down on the stove. I have cooked baked beans (starting with pre-cooked
    beans) for 22 hours with no problems.



  17. #17
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    Janet Wilder wrote:
    > On 2/23/2012 12:42 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >
    >> I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get
    >> hot enough to burn when set to slow.

    >
    >
    > Don't buy a Rival brand. Mine boiled food on "warm" I pitched it and
    > bought a Hamilton Beach. Much more reliable.


    My Rival works like a dream!



  18. #18
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    On 2/23/2012 8:33 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > Janet Wilder wrote:
    >> On 2/23/2012 12:42 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get
    >>> hot enough to burn when set to slow.

    >>
    >>
    >> Don't buy a Rival brand. Mine boiled food on "warm" I pitched it and
    >> bought a Hamilton Beach. Much more reliable.

    >
    > My Rival works like a dream!



    Not mine. Overheats every time. Last pot roast I made nearly boiled dry
    and scorched around the perimeter in eight hours at low setting, and
    there had been enough liquid in there to last all day, it wasn't over-
    or underfilled, and the lid was on properly. I've never been as unhappy
    with a slow cooker as I am with this latest Rival. After just a couple
    of years of trying to deal with it, I'm also eying a Hamilton Beach as a
    replacement.


  19. #19
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    i make excellent stock in the crock pot, Lee
    "Doug Freyburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ji6ftk$e46$[email protected]..
    > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >> David Dyer-Bennet <d...@dd-b.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I keep wondering if a crockpot might be useful. But I've found various
    >>> things on the web that are discouraging me. I'd like information from
    >>> people doing something like what I want to do, with recent cookers, to
    >>> see if it's practical.
    >>>
    >>> Spending time in the morning to prepare stuff is right out, I'm up,
    >>> through the shower, and out the door, and getting up earlier is no
    >>> something I'm willing to do.

    >
    > There's another thread that discusses assembling the ingredients the
    > night before and pulling the crockpot out of the fridge in the morning,
    > putting it into the heater unit and turing it on. To me that's standard
    > procedure for a crockpot.
    >
    >>> However, refrigerating the loaded
    >>> container overnight, or perhaps the prepared food separately and loading
    >>> it into the container in the morning, are possible.

    >>
    >>> So the next question is, how long can things cook in the crockpot? If
    >>> I'm out the door by eight in the morning and not back until 7 at night,
    >>> will it be burned / overcooked? (There might, sometimes, be a
    >>> possibility of having somebody else take the loaded container from the
    >>> refrigerator and start the crockpot in the middle of the day, but that's
    >>> my least-favorite choice, way too many things to go wrong.)

    >
    > That's esactly what a crok pot is for. When chosing the right tool for
    > the job you just did a bullseye pointing you to getitng a crockpot.
    >
    >> I've had three crockpots over the years, and they simply never get hot
    >> enough to burn when set to slow. But I only ever use them for soups
    >> and stews -- I've never tried to cook food dry in them. The lids have
    >> been heavy enough to fit tightly enough so that all the moisture
    >> inside stays inside.

    >
    > The make anything dry you need to remove the cover. Because of the heat
    > lost to evaporation it won't cook with the cover off. Thus to make any
    > dry recipe it needs to cook wet with the cover first. Then remove the
    > cover later. An hour is rarely enough to matter so that's not practical
    > for meals during the week but I have done it on the weekend.
    >
    >> When I've made stock, I have sometimes left everything in the crockpot
    >> for up to 24 hours.

    >
    > In my experience the simmer of a crockpot is too low to make good broth.
    > To me a good broth is one that bubbled slowly down. I've made broth in
    > the crockpot but not good broth.
    >
    > When making beans I've left them in the crockpot for in excess of 24
    > hours. I've had beans that were okay for dinner that day then better
    > for dinner the next day. I have not tried that without other foods.




  20. #20
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: How slow is slow cooking?

    Kalmia <[email protected]> writes:

    > Spend the extra bucks and get one with the removable liner. Mine is
    > an oldie and I have to fill it and let er soak a while. You might
    > also try oiling the interior a bit to prevent stuck on food.


    I haven't actually seen one for sale that *doesn't* have the removable
    liner. But it's definitely on my must-have list. I'll remember the
    oiling idea.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

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