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Thread: How to recreate a recipe

  1. #1
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default How to recreate a recipe

    My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive to
    buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to start.
    Here is the soup:

    http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG

    And here are the ingredients:

    Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.

    I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I will
    look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    They have a lot of beans there.

    What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed? What exactly
    is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper? The soup doesn't seen to
    have any heat to it that I can see. And I assume that the syrup is brown
    rice syrup. I will look for that too.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Feranija Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On 12/05/12 01:07, Julie Bove wrote:

    > My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive to
    > buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to start.
    > Here is the soup:
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >


    I can tell the recipe for pretty much the same bean soup as we make
    the same thing, just in our kitchen at home.


    > And here are the ingredients:
    >
    > Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    > garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.
    >
    > I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I will
    > look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    > They have a lot of beans there.



    Canellini. But if you can't get the real canellini, any small white
    kidney beans will do.


    > What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed?



    Peeled, and crushed into very small chunks, when it comes to this bean
    soup. However, it's easier to use tomato paste. We use the paste to
    cook this bean soup in our express cooker.

    > What exactly > is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper?


    Chili pepperss are all peppers originating in Mexico and further down
    south, as well as those grown in TX, NM, AZ too.
    But for masses, especially unfamiliar Europeans, the chili pepper
    refers only to _small_ hot peppers, like serano, jalapeno...
    In industrial products like this on your pictures, in almost all cases
    they'll use powdered cayenne chili pepper.


    > The soup doesn't seen to have any heat to it that I can see.



    Industry usually try to respect sensitive palates too, so they'll add
    heat in traces only. It would be risky to make the product very hot.


    > And I assume that the syrup is brown rice syrup. I will look for that too.



    Industry uses those syrups as a cheap shortcut for roux, but there is
    no any rice syrup in a real italian bean soup.

    Basically you do this:

    1. Soak canellini beans in a cold water cca. 4 hours. They will swell.
    Drain.

    2. Put in new cold water and cook a minute or two _after_ it starts to
    boil. Drain again.

    3. Put in a hot water to about an inch above beans. Add _half_ of the
    _fresh_ smallish to medium size onion choped into really small dices.
    You may grate the onion if you wish.

    4. The other half of the really fine choped onion fry in the shallow
    oil with grated carrot untill the onion becomes light brown, goldish
    color. Combine with beans. Cover it all with water

    5. Cook in express cooker 20 minutes. Measure 20 minutes _after_ a
    valve of the express cooker starts to furiosly whistle.
    First turn heat on your stove to maximum, and after the cooker starts
    to whistle, turn it down to about 1/4 of the total stove power. Now
    measure 20 minutes.

    6. Put the express cooker under a tap and a tiny stream of cold water.
    This will lower the pressure in the cooker and stop the cooking
    process. In a matter of just a minute, a safety valve will be
    released. Open the cooker. Put it back on a stove, uncovered.

    7. Prepare a roux. But not just any roux; this roux will be made of
    beef fat or lard. OK, you may use a vegetable oil if you insist. Olive
    oil as per ingredients list, but it will not be as tasty. You choose.
    So, when your flour start to become yellowish, add a really tiny diced
    garlic, minced if you prefer, keep on the stove for no more than a
    minute with constant stirring. Remove from a stove. Add hungarian
    paprika. Stirr well, add to the beans.

    8. Add a bay leaf, freshly ground black pepper, salt, and tomato
    pure/paste/pulp, as per your preferences and practicality. Our choice
    is a paste.

    9. Gently simmer for another 20 minutes, uncovered. Remove from the
    stove. Add Italian chopped parsley leaf and stirr. That's it.

    For four persons:

    450g canellini beans,
    32g flour for roux (sharp flour is preferable for any roux)
    (4 flat Tbsps for sharp, or 3 flat Tbsp for fine flour)

    80g onion,
    50g grated carrot,
    30g tomato paste,
    80g (total) fat/lard or oil for frying and roux
    (4 Tbsp of vegetable oil, or 6 flat Tbsp of animal fat),

    1.5g hungarian paprika powder (or one full very small spoon, for
    espresso cups) just be sure it's a real Hungarian paprika, not Spanish,
    1 medium size garlic clove,
    1 very small spoon freshly ground black pepper,
    4g fresh and very thinly chopped Italian parsley (or one full Tbsp),
    1 medium size bayleaf,
    1 small fresh chili, finelly chopped (may use a fat pinch or two of
    cayenne powder),
    Salt to taste.

    It will be tasty. Try it once. Adjust your seasoning after the first
    cooking. Please follow intructions to the letter, and modify it later
    if you need adjustments.

    A variation of this recipe is may favorite with smoke cured meat and
    bacon, and red kidney beans.


  3. #3
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Feranija" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jolc9a$a3c$[email protected]..
    > On 12/05/12 01:07, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive
    >> to
    >> buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to
    >> start.
    >> Here is the soup:
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>

    >
    > I can tell the recipe for pretty much the same bean soup as we make the
    > same thing, just in our kitchen at home.
    >
    >
    >> And here are the ingredients:
    >>
    >> Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    >> garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic
    >> farming.
    >>
    >> I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I
    >> will
    >> look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    >> They have a lot of beans there.

    >
    >
    > Canellini. But if you can't get the real canellini, any small white kidney
    > beans will do.
    >
    >
    >> What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed?

    >
    >
    > Peeled, and crushed into very small chunks, when it comes to this bean
    > soup. However, it's easier to use tomato paste. We use the paste to cook
    > this bean soup in our express cooker.
    >
    >> What exactly > is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper?

    >
    > Chili pepperss are all peppers originating in Mexico and further down
    > south, as well as those grown in TX, NM, AZ too.
    > But for masses, especially unfamiliar Europeans, the chili pepper refers
    > only to _small_ hot peppers, like serano, jalapeno...
    > In industrial products like this on your pictures, in almost all cases
    > they'll use powdered cayenne chili pepper.
    >
    >
    >> The soup doesn't seen to have any heat to it that I can see.

    >
    >
    > Industry usually try to respect sensitive palates too, so they'll add heat
    > in traces only. It would be risky to make the product very hot.
    >
    >
    >> And I assume that the syrup is brown rice syrup. I will look for that
    >> too.

    >
    >
    > Industry uses those syrups as a cheap shortcut for roux, but there is no
    > any rice syrup in a real italian bean soup.
    >
    > Basically you do this:
    >
    > 1. Soak canellini beans in a cold water cca. 4 hours. They will swell.
    > Drain.
    >
    > 2. Put in new cold water and cook a minute or two _after_ it starts to
    > boil. Drain again.
    >
    > 3. Put in a hot water to about an inch above beans. Add _half_ of the
    > _fresh_ smallish to medium size onion choped into really small dices. You
    > may grate the onion if you wish.
    >
    > 4. The other half of the really fine choped onion fry in the shallow oil
    > with grated carrot untill the onion becomes light brown, goldish color.
    > Combine with beans. Cover it all with water
    >
    > 5. Cook in express cooker 20 minutes. Measure 20 minutes _after_ a valve
    > of the express cooker starts to furiosly whistle.
    > First turn heat on your stove to maximum, and after the cooker starts to
    > whistle, turn it down to about 1/4 of the total stove power. Now measure
    > 20 minutes.
    >
    > 6. Put the express cooker under a tap and a tiny stream of cold water.
    > This will lower the pressure in the cooker and stop the cooking process.
    > In a matter of just a minute, a safety valve will be released. Open the
    > cooker. Put it back on a stove, uncovered.
    >
    > 7. Prepare a roux. But not just any roux; this roux will be made of beef
    > fat or lard. OK, you may use a vegetable oil if you insist. Olive oil as
    > per ingredients list, but it will not be as tasty. You choose.
    > So, when your flour start to become yellowish, add a really tiny diced
    > garlic, minced if you prefer, keep on the stove for no more than a minute
    > with constant stirring. Remove from a stove. Add hungarian paprika. Stirr
    > well, add to the beans.
    >
    > 8. Add a bay leaf, freshly ground black pepper, salt, and tomato
    > pure/paste/pulp, as per your preferences and practicality. Our choice is a
    > paste.
    >
    > 9. Gently simmer for another 20 minutes, uncovered. Remove from the stove.
    > Add Italian chopped parsley leaf and stirr. That's it.
    >
    > For four persons:
    >
    > 450g canellini beans,
    > 32g flour for roux (sharp flour is preferable for any roux)
    > (4 flat Tbsps for sharp, or 3 flat Tbsp for fine flour)
    >
    > 80g onion,
    > 50g grated carrot,
    > 30g tomato paste,
    > 80g (total) fat/lard or oil for frying and roux
    > (4 Tbsp of vegetable oil, or 6 flat Tbsp of animal fat),
    >
    > 1.5g hungarian paprika powder (or one full very small spoon, for espresso
    > cups) just be sure it's a real Hungarian paprika, not Spanish,
    > 1 medium size garlic clove,
    > 1 very small spoon freshly ground black pepper,
    > 4g fresh and very thinly chopped Italian parsley (or one full Tbsp),
    > 1 medium size bayleaf,
    > 1 small fresh chili, finelly chopped (may use a fat pinch or two of
    > cayenne powder),
    > Salt to taste.
    >
    > It will be tasty. Try it once. Adjust your seasoning after the first
    > cooking. Please follow intructions to the letter, and modify it later if
    > you need adjustments.
    >
    > A variation of this recipe is may favorite with smoke cured meat and
    > bacon, and red kidney beans.


    Thanks! But what is an express cooker?



  4. #4
    Feranija Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On 12/05/12 03:05, Julie Bove wrote:

    > Thanks! But what is an express cooker?
    >


    A kettle where food is cooked under high pressure, so it will cut time
    of cooking.

    Usually looks like this:

    1.
    http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag..._6LTR-2654.jpg

    2.
    http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag...large_2730.jpg

    Some manufactorers make them like this:

    1.
    http://www.pressurecooker.com.au/ima...e%20Cooker.JPG

  5. #5
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    In article <jold8p$er6$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > On 12/05/12 03:05, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > > Thanks! But what is an express cooker?
    > >

    >
    > A kettle where food is cooked under high pressure, so it will cut time
    > of cooking.
    >
    > Usually looks like this:
    >
    > 1.
    > http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag..._6LTR-2654.jpg
    >
    > 2.
    > http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag...large_2730.jpg
    >
    > Some manufactorers make them like this:
    >
    > 1.
    > http://www.pressurecooker.com.au/ima...e%20Cooker.JPG


    But if you haven't got a pressure cooker, you can cook it in a pan on
    the stove; it will just take a bit longer.

    Janet

  6. #6
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On 2012-05-12, Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks! But what is an express cooker?


    Same thing as a Papin's Digester.

    nb

    --
    vi --the heart of evil!
    Support labeling GMOs
    <http://www.labelgmos.org/>

  7. #7
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Feranija" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jolc9a$a3c$[email protected]..
    > On 12/05/12 01:07, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive
    >> to
    >> buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to
    >> start.
    >> Here is the soup:
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>



    "Father Tomato Bean Soup".

    Who is "Father Tomato"? What a silly name.

    Good job on the recipe creation.



  8. #8
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On Sat, 12 May 2012 01:07:02 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive to
    >buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to start.
    >Here is the soup:
    >
    >http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >
    >And here are the ingredients:
    >
    >Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    >garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.


    The jarred version is pricey because it's, well a jar. I see nothing
    expensive about that soup (not even any mystery meat), and nothing
    difficult. To be honest from reading those ingredients I wouldn't pay
    more than a buck for that jar, I wouldn't even call that soup, it's
    just a mish mosh of ingredients thrown together... you can make
    exactly the same thing by adding a can of beans to any jar of pasta
    sauce of your choice.

    >I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I will
    >look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    >They have a lot of beans there.


    Canned beans work as well or better, they also cost less when you buy
    the larger cans... and canned saves a lot of cooking time plus there's
    no crap shoot as to how they'll turn out. For a large pot of bean
    soup buy a #10 can... if you are going to cook large pots of soup
    regularly you can save even more by buying large cans by the case. I
    buy several types of canned beans in the 40 ounce size, most
    stupidmarkets carry that size, it's a very handy size and it works out
    to cost substantially less than the 16 ounce cans, and they aren't
    even 16 ounces anymore.

    >What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed?


    I'd say tomato paste... in prepared canned/jarred goods tomato paste
    would be listed as "tomato concentrate" or "tomato pulp".... look at
    your bottle of Heinz ketchup, it lists tomato concentate. All
    canned/bottled tomato juice is made with tomato concentrate... it's
    much less expensive to make your own with paste. Vine ripened
    tomatoes can't be shipped so they bring/trailer the tomato paste
    factory to the field, where tanker trucks are filled, and then truck
    all that paste to local canneries... it costs much less to truck paste
    than water. Of course for soup you can use any of the canned tomato
    products. I usually mix and match, if I want some texture I use about
    half crushed tomatoes.

    >What exactly
    >is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper? The soup doesn't seen to
    >have any heat to it that I can see.


    Probably a small smidge of cayenne... something you add to taste, or
    omit.

    >And I assume that the syrup is brown
    >rice syrup. I will look for that too.


    Probably needed a bit of sweetener, any sweetener would work... you
    may consider adding a grated carrot. You can use ordinary olive oil
    or any salad oil. You can use ordinary salt, I don't think people
    should be ingesting sea salt... anyone who has ever bathed in the
    Coney Island surf wouldn't. You don't need a recipe, you don't need
    to measure anything, I never do... I just add n' taste until whichever
    size pot I chose is full to the brim.

  9. #9
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On 5/11/2012 10:07 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive to
    > buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to start.
    > Here is the soup:
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >
    > And here are the ingredients:
    >
    > Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    > garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.
    >
    > I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I will
    > look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    > They have a lot of beans there.
    >
    > What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed? What exactly
    > is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper? The soup doesn't seen to
    > have any heat to it that I can see. And I assume that the syrup is brown
    > rice syrup. I will look for that too.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >


    The most important part is to have a clear idea of what the soup tastes
    like. You should be able to recreate the taste in your mind. If you can
    do that, it should be an easy task. If you can't then you won't be able
    to recreate this recipe.

  10. #10
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Feranija" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jold8p$er6$[email protected]..
    > On 12/05/12 03:05, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks! But what is an express cooker?
    >>

    >
    > A kettle where food is cooked under high pressure, so it will cut time of
    > cooking.
    >
    > Usually looks like this:
    >
    > 1.
    > http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag..._6LTR-2654.jpg
    >
    > 2.
    > http://www.sspremier.net/static/imag...large_2730.jpg
    >
    > Some manufactorers make them like this:
    >
    > 1.
    > http://www.pressurecooker.com.au/ima...e%20Cooker.JPG


    Oh! Okay. I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.



  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:3r5tq75eoh[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 12 May 2012 01:07:02 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive
    >>to
    >>buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to
    >>start.
    >>Here is the soup:
    >>
    >>http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>
    >>And here are the ingredients:
    >>
    >>Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    >>garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.

    >
    > The jarred version is pricey because it's, well a jar. I see nothing
    > expensive about that soup (not even any mystery meat), and nothing
    > difficult. To be honest from reading those ingredients I wouldn't pay
    > more than a buck for that jar, I wouldn't even call that soup, it's
    > just a mish mosh of ingredients thrown together... you can make
    > exactly the same thing by adding a can of beans to any jar of pasta
    > sauce of your choice.


    It's very thick! I just wanted to recreate that because my daughter
    actually likes that and she doesn't like most bean soup. I didn't want to
    make a big pot of soup only to have her not like it. And yes, I know it
    should be very cheap for me to make. I have the dried beans now and the
    brown rice syrup.
    >
    >>I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I
    >>will
    >>look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    >>They have a lot of beans there.

    >
    > Canned beans work as well or better, they also cost less when you buy
    > the larger cans... and canned saves a lot of cooking time plus there's
    > no crap shoot as to how they'll turn out. For a large pot of bean
    > soup buy a #10 can... if you are going to cook large pots of soup
    > regularly you can save even more by buying large cans by the case. I
    > buy several types of canned beans in the 40 ounce size, most
    > stupidmarkets carry that size, it's a very handy size and it works out
    > to cost substantially less than the 16 ounce cans, and they aren't
    > even 16 ounces anymore.


    I know the beans I bought at Whole Foods are fresh because it's a new store.
    At least they should be fresh! I have not seen cannellini beans in a large
    can. I even looked at Cash and Carry. They did have beans. Just not
    those.
    >
    >>What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed?

    >
    > I'd say tomato paste... in prepared canned/jarred goods tomato paste
    > would be listed as "tomato concentrate" or "tomato pulp".... look at
    > your bottle of Heinz ketchup, it lists tomato concentate. All
    > canned/bottled tomato juice is made with tomato concentrate... it's
    > much less expensive to make your own with paste. Vine ripened
    > tomatoes can't be shipped so they bring/trailer the tomato paste
    > factory to the field, where tanker trucks are filled, and then truck
    > all that paste to local canneries... it costs much less to truck paste
    > than water. Of course for soup you can use any of the canned tomato
    > products. I usually mix and match, if I want some texture I use about
    > half crushed tomatoes.
    >
    >>What exactly
    >>is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper? The soup doesn't seen
    >>to
    >>have any heat to it that I can see.

    >
    > Probably a small smidge of cayenne... something you add to taste, or
    > omit.
    >
    >>And I assume that the syrup is brown
    >>rice syrup. I will look for that too.

    >
    > Probably needed a bit of sweetener, any sweetener would work... you
    > may consider adding a grated carrot. You can use ordinary olive oil
    > or any salad oil. You can use ordinary salt, I don't think people
    > should be ingesting sea salt... anyone who has ever bathed in the
    > Coney Island surf wouldn't. You don't need a recipe, you don't need
    > to measure anything, I never do... I just add n' taste until whichever
    > size pot I chose is full to the brim.


    Yeah. I never measure when I make soup but... This soup is really thick
    and the end result is unlike any soup I have ever made. So I want to get
    somewhat of the same.



  12. #12
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jomcib$hs$[email protected]..
    > On 5/11/2012 10:07 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive
    >> to
    >> buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to
    >> start.
    >> Here is the soup:
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>
    >> And here are the ingredients:
    >>
    >> Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    >> garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic
    >> farming.
    >>
    >> I am pretty sure the beans are canellini or white kidney beans which I
    >> will
    >> look for tomorrow at Whole Foods. I have found canned but not the dried.
    >> They have a lot of beans there.
    >>
    >> What is the pulp of tomatoes? Would that be crushed? Pureed? What
    >> exactly
    >> is chili pepper? Is it a certain kind of pepper? The soup doesn't seen
    >> to
    >> have any heat to it that I can see. And I assume that the syrup is brown
    >> rice syrup. I will look for that too.
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >>

    >
    > The most important part is to have a clear idea of what the soup tastes
    > like. You should be able to recreate the taste in your mind. If you can do
    > that, it should be an easy task. If you can't then you won't be able to
    > recreate this recipe.


    Yes. That's what I usually do with things.



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On Sat, 12 May 2012 21:13:09 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    > pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    > purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.
    >

    You probably wouldn't. I bought one a couple of years ago, but I
    can't say I've done anything near what would be called a "recipe"
    I've followed "methods", not cooking times or measures.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jomcib$hs$[email protected]..
    > On 5/11/2012 10:07 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> My daughter really loves this soup and I like it too but it is expensive
    >> to
    >> buy! I want to make a big pot of it but am unsure really of where to
    >> start.
    >> Here is the soup:
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>

    (snippage)
    >
    > The most important part is to have a clear idea of what the soup tastes
    > like. You should be able to recreate the taste in your mind. If you can do
    > that, it should be an easy task. If you can't then you won't be able to
    > recreate this recipe.
    >

    This is the most logical response to this thread I've heard. There is no
    way to recreate a recipe without knowing in your mind exactly what it tastes
    like. I have recreated many recipes in my life and if you cannot imagine
    what it tastes like you'll never get it right. I stupidly left out one
    simple ingredient in Catfish Acadian (re-created from the Bayou Bar & Grill,
    Midtown Memphis, TN) and it wasn't right. I emailed the chef explaining
    what I'd done, asking what I'd missed. His reply was "celery"

    Jill


  15. #15
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 12 May 2012 21:13:09 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    >> pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    >> purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.
    >>

    > You probably wouldn't. I bought one a couple of years ago, but I
    > can't say I've done anything near what would be called a "recipe"
    > I've followed "methods", not cooking times or measures.


    I use mine a lot, but not really recipes either, just stuff I want to cook
    quickly.

    Cheri


  16. #16
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Sat, 12 May 2012 21:13:09 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    >>> pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    >>> purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.
    >>>

    >> You probably wouldn't. I bought one a couple of years ago, but I
    >> can't say I've done anything near what would be called a "recipe"
    >> I've followed "methods", not cooking times or measures.

    >
    > I use mine a lot, but not really recipes either, just stuff I want to cook
    > quickly.


    What do you cook in it? I thought they were mainly for meat. At least
    that's what my mom used to use hers for. We don't eat very much meat.



  17. #17
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    On Sat, 12 May 2012 23:41:18 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Sat, 12 May 2012 21:13:09 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    >>>> pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    >>>> purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.
    >>>>
    >>> You probably wouldn't. I bought one a couple of years ago, but I
    >>> can't say I've done anything near what would be called a "recipe"
    >>> I've followed "methods", not cooking times or measures.

    >>
    >> I use mine a lot, but not really recipes either, just stuff I want to cook
    >> quickly.

    >
    >What do you cook in it? I thought they were mainly for meat. At least
    >that's what my mom used to use hers for. We don't eat very much meat.
    >


    It is great for cooking beans as well as other things. I don't use
    mine every day but I have had one since we married 50 years ago. My
    mother had one when I was growing up. I am now using my MIL's which I
    got after she died.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    "Julie Bove" wrote:
    > "Brooklyn1" wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove" wrote:
    >>
    >>>My daughter really loves this soup
    >>>
    >>>http://www.amazon.com/Don-Pomodoro-N.../dp/B004Q6RZGG
    >>>
    >>>the ingredients:
    >>>
    >>>Beans, water, pulp of tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, onion, sea salt,
    >>>garlic, parsley , chili pepper, rosemary, rice syrup from organic farming.

    >>
    >> you can make exactly the same thing by adding canned beans to any jarred
    >> pasta sauce of your choice.

    >
    >I just wanted to recreate that because my daughter
    >actually likes that and she doesn't like most bean soup.
    >I didn't want to make a big pot of soup only to have her not like it.


    Then WTF are you bothering people?!?!?

    After reading how picky an eater your daughter is I strongly recommend
    you just spring for a couple of jars... don't buy too many as there is
    a very good chance that the very next time your daughter won't like
    it.... and you'll probably find something wrong with it too and have
    to donate it to the food bank.

    I just thought of the remedy for your problem, have a surgeon insert a
    port into both yours and your daughter's stomachs, then you can be
    tube fed with a formula, you'll never again have to taste anything.



  19. #19
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe

    cabbage tougher veggies, beans, meat, rice, potatoes, about anything really
    except delicate items, Lee
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jonl2f$54s$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Sat, 12 May 2012 21:13:09 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I know what a pressure cooker is but don't own one. They are
    >>>> pretty expensive here. Not sure I would use one enough to warrant the
    >>>> purchase of it or trying to make the storage room for it.
    >>>>
    >>> You probably wouldn't. I bought one a couple of years ago, but I
    >>> can't say I've done anything near what would be called a "recipe"
    >>> I've followed "methods", not cooking times or measures.

    >>
    >> I use mine a lot, but not really recipes either, just stuff I want to
    >> cook quickly.

    >
    > What do you cook in it? I thought they were mainly for meat. At least
    > that's what my mom used to use hers for. We don't eat very much meat.
    >




  20. #20
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: How to recreate a recipe


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > cabbage tougher veggies, beans, meat, rice, potatoes, about anything
    > really except delicate items, Lee



    Thanks!



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