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Thread: How to make bread pudding?

  1. #1
    Kajikit Guest

    Default How to make bread pudding?

    Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?

  2. #2
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit wrote:
    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    Oh, gee, that sounds like the cherry bread pudding I made decades
    ago. You whomped the bread mixture up in the blender. It was
    really delicious. Then I lost the knack--and the recipe.

    --
    Jean B.

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding? + recipe

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    Not crumbs, Karen, but chunks or cubes. There are tons of recipes
    online. Ruth, one of the cooks in the company caf used to make a very
    popular bread pudding. She used day-old cinnamon rolls for the bread.
    Using leftover rolls made with a sweet dough is not uncommon. This is a
    recipe I included in a class I taught. It doesn't require a sweet bread.

    -- Apple Butter Bread Pudding

    6 slices thin sliced firm type bread, crusts trimmed
    3/4 cups (approximately) apple butter
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
    2 cups milk
    4 large eggs
    1/3 cup sugar
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    Cinnamon sugar (recipe below)
    1 cup heavy cream or half and half

    1. Line up 3 slices bread on cutting board; trim crusts; reserve crusts
    for other use. Spread apple butter on bread. Top with remaining 3 slices
    bread. Lightly brush a 6 cup casserole or souffle dish with some of the
    melted butter. Brush top layer of bread with remaining butter.

    2. Cut each apple butter sandwich into nine 1-inch squares. Place
    randomly in the buttered souffle dish.

    3. Whisk milk, eggs, sugar, vanilla extract and cinnamon in a large
    bowl. Pour over bread; press down lightly with the back of a spatula so
    bread is covered with milk.

    4. Let stand one hour, or more. (Pudding can be made up one day ahead up
    to this step; cover and refrigerate until ready to bake.)

    5. Heat oven to 350?F. Heat kettle of water to boiling. Place the
    pudding dish in shallow baking pan large enough to hold it. Place in
    preheated oven and add boiling water halfway up the sides of baking pan.

    6. Bake until pudding is puffed and browned and skewer inserted in
    center comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool
    in water bath. Sprinkle the top of the pudding generously with cinnamon
    sugar. Serve warm or at room temperature with a drizzle of heavy cream
    or half and half.

    Preparation time: 10 minutes * Soaking time 1 hour or overnight *
    Serves: 6 to 8

    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    <http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor>
    December 27, 2008, 7:30 a.m.: "I have fixed my roof,
    I have mended my fences; now let the winter winds blow."

  4. #4
    ravenlynne Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit wrote:
    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    When I make it, I tear up the bread into little bits then soak it for at
    least 10 minutes in the egg/milk/sugar/cinnamon mix...I get in there
    with my fingers and squish it all up together and it comes out like you
    noted above. Removing crusts can be a bonus.

  5. #5
    tintalle Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Jan 4, 2:28*pm, Kajikit <kaji...@jagcon.com> wrote:
    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    I made bread pudding for my family for dessert on xmas day. I'd never
    made it before, and sure didn't follow a recipe.
    I used about 1/2 a loaf of soft white bread that was a few days old,
    and 6 or 8 large croissants that were also a few days old. Everything
    was cubed up (crusts left on the bread). I beat together a dozen
    eggs, a cup or so of egg nog, and some milk to round it out. Added
    just under a cup of sugar, some vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg. The
    bread cubes were spread into two buttered dishes, with the custard
    mixture ladled over top. Then the fun part, squishing down the bread
    to make sure that every morsel sucked up the liquid. I did all this
    at about 10 am, planning to eat it around 3. Over top went a mixture
    of chopped walnuts, dried cranberries, and a few squares of dark
    chocolate rough chopped. It was baked at about 300 for an hour or
    so. Served it with a caramel/rum/butter sauce and everyone just raved
    over it.

    The finished product:
    http://i44.tinypic.com/99p20x.jpg

    tint

  6. #6
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit wrote:
    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    Your bread & butter pudding sounds very good, but variety is always nice.

    Here is my favorite recipe for bread pudding. The 2nd recipe, is a
    chocolate bread pudding that I cooked up in '97, after trying over and
    over to get it right.

    New Orleans Bread Pudding

    1 Loaf French bread
    1 Quart milk
    3 Eggs
    2 c Sugar
    2 tb Vanilla extract
    2 ts Ground cinnamon
    1 c Raisins
    3 tb Melted margarine or butter
    1 c Sugar
    1 Stick butter -(or margarine)
    1 Egg, beaten
    2 oz Bourbon whiskey


    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Tear bread into chunks and soak in milk.
    Crush with hands to make sure milk has soaked through. Add eggs, sugar,
    vanilla, cinnamon, raisins and stir well. Pour melted butter in bottom
    of a heavy 9 x 14 baking pan. Add bread mixture (and you can sprinkle
    more cinnamon and raisins on top) and bake until very firm, about 40
    minutes. Cool pudding, cube it and put it into individual dessert
    dishes. When ready to serve, add whiskey sauce and heat under broiler
    for a few minutes (last step optional).


    Whiskey sauce:

    Cream sugar and butter and cook in a double-boiler until very hot and
    well dissolved. Add well-beaten egg very slowly and whip very fast so
    the egg doesn't curdle. Cool and add liquor.



    Chocolate Bread Pudding

    Recipe By : Becca Love
    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 loaf bread -- crust trimmed
    3 1/2 cups milk
    3/4 cup chocolate chips
    3 large eggs
    2 cups sugar
    2 tablespoons vanilla extract
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1 cup macadamia nuts -- halved or coarsely chopped
    1 cup dried cherries
    dash salt
    3 tablespoons margarine -- melted
    whipped cream -- optional

    Chocolate Sauce

    1/2 cup butter or margarine
    2 cups pecan halves
    1 cup heavy cream
    1/4 cup chocolate chips
    1 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons bourbon
    1/4 cup coffee

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

    Cube bread, or tear into chunks. Heat milk in microwave safe bowl, just
    until warm. Add chocolate chips and whisk gently until chocolate has
    melted.

    Beat eggs, then whisk a little of the milk mixture into the eggs, then
    add the egg mixture to the milk mixture and mix well. Add sugar,
    vanilla, cinnamon, salt, nuts and dried cherries. Stir well.

    Pour this mixture over cubed bread; toss and stir well.

    Pour melted margarine into a heavy 9 inch by 14 inch baking dish. Add
    bread mixture and bake until firm, about 40 minutes.

    Cool pudding, cut into cubes and put into individual serving dishes.
    When ready to serve, add sauce and heat for a few minutes, top with
    whipped cream.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Becca

  7. #7
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?



    Kajikit wrote:
    >
    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    That is a very British type of bread pudding. The one with bread slices
    is usually called 'bread and butter pudding' rather than bread pudding.

    Here is a recipe:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/da...ing_1024.shtml

  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Sun, 4 Jan 2009 10:44:12 -0800 (PST), tintalle wrote:


    > I made bread pudding for my family for dessert on xmas day. I'd never
    > made it before, and sure didn't follow a recipe.


    I did, also. I'd never made bread pudding either, so I just grabbed the
    first recipe I googled. I used golden raisins and also added walnuts. I
    also added the simple sugar sauce given. It came out great and I'm a new
    bread pudding convert. What a great way to use up old bread. I think I'll
    try rice pudding next.

    http://www.momswhothink.com/easy-rec...ng-recipe.html

    nb

  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Sun 04 Jan 2009 09:53:28p, notbob told us...

    > On Sun, 4 Jan 2009 10:44:12 -0800 (PST), tintalle wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I made bread pudding for my family for dessert on xmas day. I'd never
    >> made it before, and sure didn't follow a recipe.

    >
    > I did, also. I'd never made bread pudding either, so I just grabbed the
    > first recipe I googled. I used golden raisins and also added walnuts. I
    > also added the simple sugar sauce given. It came out great and I'm a new
    > bread pudding convert. What a great way to use up old bread. I think

    I'll
    > try rice pudding next.
    >
    > http://www.momswhothink.com/easy-rec...ng-recipe.html
    >
    > nb
    >


    No matter what the recipe you use calls for, use short grain rice for the
    pudding. It's much creamier.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
    ************************************************** **********************
    Date: Sunday, 01(I)/04(IV)/09(MMIX)
    ************************************************** **********************
    Countdown till Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
    2wks 1hrs 54mins
    ************************************************** **********************
    Even a hawk is an eagle among crows.
    ************************************************** **********************


  10. #10
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    > bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    > sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    > visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    > they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    > visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    > embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    > pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    > breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?


    Apologies first - I have no assistance for you with the bread pudding.
    However, just wanted to say - next Easter, try making bread and butter
    pudding with left over hot cross buns (if you don't usually have any left
    over, buy extra :-)). No jam. And use half cream/half milk for the custard.

    Is good..

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

  11. #11
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 11:14:33 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected] :
    >
    >> Mama taught me to make bread and butter pudding by taking slices of
    >> bread, buttering them and putting jam on them or sprinkling them with
    >> sugar and fruit, then baking them in a custard. It comes out with
    >> visible slices of bread in it... we went out to dinner last week and
    >> they had a bread pudding that was absolutely delicous, but it had no
    >> visible bread in it - it was a solid lump of pudding with the fruit
    >> embedded in it. DH loved it even though he's always said 'bread
    >> pudding, ugh!'... does anyone know how to make it? I assume they used
    >> breadcrumbs instead of sliced bread?

    >
    >Apologies first - I have no assistance for you with the bread pudding.
    >However, just wanted to say - next Easter, try making bread and butter
    >pudding with left over hot cross buns (if you don't usually have any left
    >over, buy extra :-)). No jam. And use half cream/half milk for the custard.
    >
    >Is good..


    I'd love to... but 'real' hot cross buns are something else they just
    don't have in the US!!!!!!!!! Publix has something they CALL 'hot
    cross buns' but they're just a plain old fruit bun with an icing cross
    piped on the top of it, and they don't taste the same at all.

  12. #12
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit wrote:

    > I'd love to... but 'real' hot cross buns are something else they just
    > don't have in the US!!!!!!!!! Publix has something they CALL 'hot
    > cross buns' but they're just a plain old fruit bun with an icing cross
    > piped on the top of it, and they don't taste the same at all.


    You are right, they are not the same thing.

    Do you like crumpets? Pepperidge Farm test marketed crumpets, where I
    lived, and they were wonderful. My friend from England dropped by, and
    she was so excited she couldn't stand it. They were good, very good,
    but they quit making them. What a bummer.

    Becca

  13. #13
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Becca wrote:

    >
    > Do you like crumpets? Pepperidge Farm test marketed crumpets, where I
    > lived, and they were wonderful. My friend from England dropped by, and
    > she was so excited she couldn't stand it. They were good, very good,
    > but they quit making them. What a bummer.
    >
    > Becca



    Our Sunflower Market carries "Gourmet Baker" crumpets made in Canada, I
    think. They are very good.

    gloria p

  14. #14
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 20:55:23 -0700, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >Our Sunflower Market carries "Gourmet Baker" crumpets made in Canada, I
    >think. They are very good.
    >
    >gloria p


    I will have to look for those next time I go to Sunflower here.

    How do you like that market, Gloria? I am a regular shopper at the
    ones here in town....

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  15. #15
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Sunflower Market (was Re: How to make bread pudding?)

    Christine Dabney wrote:

    >
    > How do you like that market, Gloria? I am a regular shopper at the
    > ones here in town....
    >



    I like it a lot, but can't find everything I want there. We just had one
    open a couple of miles from home. I get there a lot more often than the
    older one which was a lot further away.

    Their "health and beauty" section is really, really expensive, even for
    ordinary items.

    It reminds me of Henry's/Boney's in San Diego, which by coincidence
    opened a store (called "Sprouts" here) about 5 miles away, the same week
    as Sunflower.

    They still aren't Trader Joe's, however, but they have better produce
    than most of the local supermarkets. The closest TJ is in Santa Fe, I
    believe. :-(

    gloria p

  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Sunflower Market (was Re: How to make bread pudding?)

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 21:52:33 -0700, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >It reminds me of Henry's/Boney's in San Diego, which by coincidence
    >opened a store (called "Sprouts" here) about 5 miles away, the same week
    >as Sunflower.
    >
    >They still aren't Trader Joe's, however, but they have better produce
    >than most of the local supermarkets. The closest TJ is in Santa Fe, I
    >believe. :-(
    >
    >gloria p


    Yeah, it has some of the better produce here in town... I think only
    Whole Foods has better produce...at higher prices. I get really good
    deals here at Sunflower. I often stop on the way home from work.

    It is about the only place here in town where I can find Italian
    parsley at a decent price. And they have good blood oranges in the
    winter, as well as Cara Cara oranges. Just hoping that one day they
    will carry Meyer lemons.

    Maybe TJs will get up thataway sometime in the next few years...

    Christine, who is lucky to have a TJs here in town too.
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 11:14:33 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>
    >>Apologies first - I have no assistance for you with the bread pudding.
    >>However, just wanted to say - next Easter, try making bread and butter
    >>pudding with left over hot cross buns (if you don't usually have any
    >>left over, buy extra :-)). No jam. And use half cream/half milk for
    >>the custard.
    >>
    >>Is good..

    >
    > I'd love to... but 'real' hot cross buns are something else they just
    > don't have in the US!!!!!!!!! Publix has something they CALL 'hot
    > cross buns' but they're just a plain old fruit bun with an icing cross
    > piped on the top of it, and they don't taste the same at all.


    No little independent bakeries make them? That's a bummer. Well, if you
    like baking bread and other yeasty things you could make some for yourself.
    Or come Easter I could mail you some <g>.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

  18. #18
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding? + recipe

    On Sun, 04 Jan 2009 12:21:46 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >-- Apple Butter Bread Pudding


    I googled quickly for apple butter recipes. Is it possible (or wise)
    to make a small batch that doesn't have to go through the canning
    process? I've threatened to take up canning but i still don't have
    the equipment.

    TIA

    Lou

  19. #19
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 09:53:58 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected] :
    >
    >> On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 11:14:33 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>>
    >>>Apologies first - I have no assistance for you with the bread pudding.
    >>>However, just wanted to say - next Easter, try making bread and butter
    >>>pudding with left over hot cross buns (if you don't usually have any
    >>>left over, buy extra :-)). No jam. And use half cream/half milk for
    >>>the custard.
    >>>
    >>>Is good..

    >>
    >> I'd love to... but 'real' hot cross buns are something else they just
    >> don't have in the US!!!!!!!!! Publix has something they CALL 'hot
    >> cross buns' but they're just a plain old fruit bun with an icing cross
    >> piped on the top of it, and they don't taste the same at all.

    >
    >No little independent bakeries make them? That's a bummer. Well, if you
    >like baking bread and other yeasty things you could make some for yourself.
    >Or come Easter I could mail you some <g>.


    How about a recipe? I would like to try making some especially since
    the ones available in the US don't seem to be the "real" thing.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  20. #20
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: How to make bread pudding?

    The Cook <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 09:53:58 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>news:[email protected] m:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I'd love to... but 'real' hot cross buns are something else they
    >>> just don't have in the US!!!!!!!!! Publix has something they CALL
    >>> 'hot cross buns' but they're just a plain old fruit bun with an
    >>> icing cross piped on the top of it, and they don't taste the same at
    >>> all.

    >>
    >>No little independent bakeries make them? That's a bummer. Well, if
    >>you like baking bread and other yeasty things you could make some for
    >>yourself. Or come Easter I could mail you some <g>.

    >
    > How about a recipe? I would like to try making some especially since
    > the ones available in the US don't seem to be the "real" thing.


    I'm just heading off to bed now as it's gone midnight and I have to be up
    early for work, but I'll rustle one up tomorrow night and post it. I've
    only made them once or twice myself - they're for sale at every supermarket
    and bakery at Easter so I don't often bother. Plus I seem to have been born
    without the gene that allows you to make good flour and water paste crosses
    - mine are always wonky.

    As I'm not in the US I've no idea what the hot cross buns available there
    are like, but from Kajikit's description it seems that for starters they're
    missing the spices - hot cross buns as I know them are a little different
    to a plain fruit bun.
    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

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