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Thread: How do you guys like your back ribs?

  1. #1
    Portland Guest

    Default How do you guys like your back ribs?

    Besides on the barbecue. I'm talking oven roasting. I take a rack,
    remove the skin off the back side, rub it with what I have on hand in
    terms of spices mixed up with some olive oil, spoon on some mustard
    (you're supposed to mustard it first, before the rub, but I don't) and
    leave it in the fridge overnight.
    Roast in an open pan for a few hours at 300F (length of cooking time
    depends upon the actual heat of the oven; if you've got an accurate
    oven thermometer then I'd say 300F at around 3 hours.)
    Then brush with sauce; your favourite until it sets on there but is
    not a bit burned. This is the sauce that I used the last time I made
    ribs this way: (I lost the recipe so I can only list ingredients)
    Ketchup
    Olive Oil
    Brown Sugar
    Apple Cider Vinegar
    Mustard (I just use the yellow ball park French's style)
    Juice of lemon
    Lemon shell
    Worcestershire Sauce
    Cayenne
    I've never added liquid smoke, but it might be a good addition; not
    too much.
    Simmer half hour. Look on the web at related recipes for
    measurements.

  2. #2
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    Re: ac5782a7-9c15-416c-b75e-31e7f36d0b55...oglegroups.com

    Portland <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Besides on the barbecue. I'm talking oven roasting.


    Having cooked a couple slabs here and there I'd offer a few suggestions.
    (Presuming you don't have a smoker or can't use it right now for some
    reason, otherwise shame on you ;-) )

    Go a little lower on temp... say 265-275F

    Since you're trying to mimic barbecue, might as well consider a bit of
    liquid smoke in your sauce/glaze. (Don't tell anyone I said that.)

    There's a formula called 3-2-1, meaning 3 hours in the smoke (oven in your
    case) 2 in foil, 1 or less for glazing back out of the foil.

    However baby backs cook faster than spares so 2-1-1 will probably suffice
    and also it's my opinion that the forumula was based on lower cook temps.
    (no way to really verify that though, it's just my experience)

    Looking at your sauce you seem to like them sweet. There's a good technique
    for foiling where you lay out a couple sheets of foil, and put on some
    combination of brown sugar, sauce, apple or grape juice, and fat like butter
    or... gasp... squeeze margarine. First time I'd just do a little sauce and
    butter since your sauce is already sugared. Place your partially cooked ribs
    meat side down in the resulting goo and double wrap. Put back in the smoker
    or oven for roughly another hour, but feel or peek to make sure the meat
    isn't pulling back more than an inch from the bone, if that. If it is, don't
    go the whole hour, it's ready for the next step.

    Glazing: Remove the ribs in foil and open them up. Flip the ribs over meat
    side up and leave them in the foil. You'll now find a nice sauce in the
    foil. Glaze the ribs periodically with the foil sauce until you believe they
    are done. If meat is pulled back from the bone ends and it seems the slab
    will break apart when picked up, it's done. Fall off the bone isn't
    necessary or even desirable for most tastes, since that is a sign it's
    overcooked. Perfect doneness is usually considered (in competition circles
    anyway) where you can take a bite that pulls away cleanly from bone, leaving
    the rest of the meat intact on the bone. If they seem to be falling apart,
    especially towards the middle, get them out of the heat ASAP. Overcooked
    ribs can get very mushy.

    And don't be afraid to try spare ribs. They take a little longer but have
    more flavor since there is more fat and collagen to render and baste the
    meat. If you don't like the rib tips (cartilage area running crosswise to
    the bones at the top of the slap) just buy or trim your spares down to St.
    Louis cut. Here's how: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ

    Good luck with your rack!

    MartyB



  3. #3
    Portland Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On Apr 14, 6:18*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > Re: ac5782a7-9c15-416c-b75e-31e7f36d0...@j17g2000vbr.googlegroups.com
    >
    > Portland <railyardbl...@ymail.com> wrote:
    > > Besides on the barbecue. *I'm talking oven roasting.

    >
    > Having cooked a couple slabs here and there I'd offer a few suggestions.
    > (Presuming you don't have a smoker or can't use it right now for some
    > reason, otherwise shame on you ;-) )
    >
    > Go a little lower on temp... say 265-275F
    >
    > Since you're trying to mimic barbecue, might as well consider a bit of
    > liquid smoke in your sauce/glaze. (Don't tell anyone I said that.)
    >
    > There's a formula called 3-2-1, meaning 3 hours in the smoke (oven in your
    > case) 2 in foil, 1 or less for glazing back out of the foil.
    >
    > However baby backs cook faster than spares so 2-1-1 will probably suffice
    > and also it's my opinion that the forumula was based on lower cook temps.
    > (no way to really verify that though, it's just my experience)
    >
    > Looking at your sauce you seem to like them sweet. There's a good technique
    > for foiling where you lay out a couple sheets of foil, and put on some
    > combination of brown sugar, sauce, apple or grape juice, and fat like butter
    > or... gasp... squeeze margarine. First time I'd just do a little sauce and
    > butter since your sauce is already sugared. Place your partially cooked ribs
    > meat side down in the resulting goo and double wrap. Put back in the smoker
    > or oven for roughly another hour, but feel or peek to make sure the meat
    > isn't pulling back more than an inch from the bone, if that. If it is, don't
    > go the whole hour, it's ready for the next step.
    >
    > Glazing: Remove the ribs in foil and open them up. Flip the ribs over meat
    > side up and leave them in the foil. You'll now find a nice sauce in the
    > foil. Glaze the ribs periodically with the foil sauce until you believe they
    > are done. If meat is pulled back from the bone ends and it seems the slab
    > will break apart when picked up, it's done. Fall off the bone isn't
    > necessary or even desirable for most tastes, since that is a sign it's
    > overcooked. Perfect doneness is usually considered (in competition circles
    > anyway) where you can take a bite that pulls away cleanly from bone, leaving
    > the rest of the meat intact on the bone. If they seem to be falling apart,
    > especially towards the middle, get them out of the heat ASAP. Overcooked
    > ribs can get very mushy.
    >
    > And don't be afraid to try spare ribs. They take a little longer but have
    > more flavor since there is more fat and collagen to render and baste the
    > meat. If you don't like the rib tips (cartilage area running crosswise to
    > the bones at the top of the slap) just buy or trim your spares down to St..
    > Louis cut. Here's how:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ
    >
    > Good luck with your rack!
    >
    > MartyB


    Hmmmm. Food for thought. I'm going to do a couple of racks this
    weekend. And I don't like my sauce too sweet; so brown sugar, I'll
    cut down upon.
    You're right about overcooked ribs. They are mushy and a waste of
    money if you let them get to that stage. As for side ribs, I like the
    cartilage. If they are done well enough, this cartilage becomes
    edible.

  4. #4
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    Re: df334187-4175-4a12-8bb0-6d0bfb525288...oglegroups.com

    Portland <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 14, 6:18 pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    > september.invalid> wrote:
    >> Re: ac5782a7-9c15-416c-b75e-31e7f36d0...@j17g2000vbr.googlegroups.com
    >>
    >> Portland <railyardbl...@ymail.com> wrote:
    >>> Besides on the barbecue. I'm talking oven roasting.

    >>
    >> Having cooked a couple slabs here and there I'd offer a few
    >> suggestions. (Presuming you don't have a smoker or can't use it
    >> right now for some reason, otherwise shame on you ;-) )
    >>
    >> Go a little lower on temp... say 265-275F
    >>
    >> Since you're trying to mimic barbecue, might as well consider a bit
    >> of liquid smoke in your sauce/glaze. (Don't tell anyone I said that.)
    >>
    >> There's a formula called 3-2-1, meaning 3 hours in the smoke (oven
    >> in your case) 2 in foil, 1 or less for glazing back out of the foil.
    >>
    >> However baby backs cook faster than spares so 2-1-1 will probably
    >> suffice and also it's my opinion that the forumula was based on
    >> lower cook temps. (no way to really verify that though, it's just my
    >> experience)
    >>
    >> Looking at your sauce you seem to like them sweet. There's a good
    >> technique for foiling where you lay out a couple sheets of foil, and
    >> put on some combination of brown sugar, sauce, apple or grape juice,
    >> and fat like butter or... gasp... squeeze margarine. First time I'd
    >> just do a little sauce and butter since your sauce is already
    >> sugared. Place your partially cooked ribs meat side down in the
    >> resulting goo and double wrap. Put back in the smoker or oven for
    >> roughly another hour, but feel or peek to make sure the meat isn't
    >> pulling back more than an inch from the bone, if that. If it is,
    >> don't go the whole hour, it's ready for the next step.
    >>
    >> Glazing: Remove the ribs in foil and open them up. Flip the ribs
    >> over meat side up and leave them in the foil. You'll now find a nice
    >> sauce in the foil. Glaze the ribs periodically with the foil sauce
    >> until you believe they are done. If meat is pulled back from the
    >> bone ends and it seems the slab will break apart when picked up,
    >> it's done. Fall off the bone isn't necessary or even desirable for
    >> most tastes, since that is a sign it's overcooked. Perfect doneness
    >> is usually considered (in competition circles anyway) where you can
    >> take a bite that pulls away cleanly from bone, leaving the rest of
    >> the meat intact on the bone. If they seem to be falling apart,
    >> especially towards the middle, get them out of the heat ASAP.
    >> Overcooked ribs can get very mushy.
    >>
    >> And don't be afraid to try spare ribs. They take a little longer but
    >> have more flavor since there is more fat and collagen to render and
    >> baste the meat. If you don't like the rib tips (cartilage area
    >> running crosswise to the bones at the top of the slap) just buy or
    >> trim your spares down to St. Louis cut. Here's
    >> how:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ
    >>
    >> Good luck with your rack!
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > Hmmmm. Food for thought. I'm going to do a couple of racks this
    > weekend. And I don't like my sauce too sweet; so brown sugar, I'll
    > cut down upon.
    > You're right about overcooked ribs. They are mushy and a waste of
    > money if you let them get to that stage. As for side ribs, I like the
    > cartilage. If they are done well enough, this cartilage becomes
    > edible.


    I like them myself. I cut them off and into smaller pieces and cook them on
    the side. They are done earlier... cooks snack!



  5. #5
    Michael O'Connor Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    spare bedroom. I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. I smoked a whole
    chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.

    I always make my own barbeque sauce. I use a combination of ketchup
    and or yellow mustard, brown sugar, white vinegar, honey and a splash
    of hot sauce to taste and adding small amounts of each ingredient
    until I get the taste right and simmering it for 15-20 minutes. It
    tastes so much better than that stuff in the bottle. I like to go with
    a rub of equal amounts Kosher Salt, fresh cracked Black Pepper, Old
    Bay Seasoning, Brown Sugar and Emeril's Essence for ribs; for chicken
    I will leave out the brown sugar.

  6. #6
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On 4/14/2011 8:05 PM, Portland wrote:

    > You're right about overcooked ribs. They are mushy and a waste of
    > money if you let them get to that stage. As for side ribs, I like the
    > cartilage. If they are done well enough, this cartilage becomes
    > edible.


    Very true. I recently ruined a rack of beef ribs by slow cooking them
    too long. Ick.

  7. #7
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On 4/14/2011 1:49 PM, Portland wrote:
    > (I lost the recipe so I can only list ingredients)
    > Ketchup
    > Olive Oil
    > Brown Sugar
    > Apple Cider Vinegar
    > Mustard (I just use the yellow ball park French's style)
    > Juice of lemon
    > Lemon shell


    What is lemon shell?

    > Worcestershire Sauce
    > Cayenne
    > I've never added liquid smoke, but it might be a good addition; not
    > too much.
    > Simmer half hour. Look on the web at related recipes for
    > measurements.




  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2011 21:15:40 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On 4/14/2011 1:49 PM, Portland wrote:
    > > (I lost the recipe so I can only list ingredients)
    > > Ketchup
    > > Olive Oil
    > > Brown Sugar
    > > Apple Cider Vinegar
    > > Mustard (I just use the yellow ball park French's style)
    > > Juice of lemon
    > > Lemon shell

    >
    > What is lemon shell?


    It can mean one of two things. When people cook it, sometimes they
    throw rest of it into the pot after it has been juiced. I'd call
    what's left a shell too, because you're not cutting it. These days,
    every recipe wants you to zest the lemon and use the juice too.
    Either way is find because it's the lemon oil from the zest that
    you're looking for.
    >
    > > Worcestershire Sauce
    > > Cayenne
    > > I've never added liquid smoke, but it might be a good addition; not
    > > too much.
    > > Simmer half hour. Look on the web at related recipes for
    > > measurements.

    >

    Simmer for half an hour... so use the first definition.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  9. #9
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?


    "Michael O'Connor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    > spare bedroom. I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    > wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    > detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. I smoked a whole
    > chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.
    >

    Please don't tell me you're using your smoker INSIDE the apartment?!

    Jill


  10. #10
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On 4/14/2011 2:48 PM, Michael O'Connor wrote:
    > I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    > spare bedroom. I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    > wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    > detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. I smoked a whole
    > chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.


    Hopefully, your smoke detector also detects CO. My dad used to smoke
    meats for our annual Christmas shindig. He used coarse Hawaiian salt and
    pepper. That's all. His smoker was a red 55 gal drum although in later
    years he used a big red kamado.

    He'd smoke chicken and what I think must have been chuck steak. It was
    great stuff and the meats would come out a deep reddish-pink color which
    I think means there was a whole lot of CO produced in the smoker. Good
    thing we didn't live in an apartment! I asked my dad where he learned to
    cook like that and he told me it was just something he came up with. I
    tried to do some smoking myself 10 years ago but never was any good at
    it. That's the breaks.

    Methinks that you should maybe get a pet canary.

    >
    > I always make my own barbeque sauce. I use a combination of ketchup
    > and or yellow mustard, brown sugar, white vinegar, honey and a splash
    > of hot sauce to taste and adding small amounts of each ingredient
    > until I get the taste right and simmering it for 15-20 minutes. It
    > tastes so much better than that stuff in the bottle. I like to go with
    > a rub of equal amounts Kosher Salt, fresh cracked Black Pepper, Old
    > Bay Seasoning, Brown Sugar and Emeril's Essence for ribs; for chicken
    > I will leave out the brown sugar.



  11. #11
    Michael O'Connor Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On Apr 15, 3:15*am, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "Michael O'Connor" <mpoconn...@aol.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..>I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    > > spare bedroom. *I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    > > wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    > > detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. *I smoked a whole
    > > chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.

    >
    > Please don't tell me you're using your smoker INSIDE the apartment?!
    >


    I fashioned an makeshift smoker that goes in the oven using two pans,
    a foil pan for the wood chips, and a lot of foil to hold all the smoke
    inside the smoker apparatus and use a low oven heat to smoke the wood
    chips. I am not allowed to use my wood/charcoal smoker at my
    apartment complex, so it is being kept safe and dry until I move to a
    place where I can use it.

  12. #12
    Portland Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On Apr 14, 9:15*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > On 4/14/2011 1:49 PM, Portland wrote:
    >
    > > (I lost the recipe so I can only list ingredients)
    > > Ketchup
    > > Olive Oil
    > > Brown Sugar
    > > Apple Cider Vinegar
    > > Mustard (I just use the yellow ball park French's style)
    > > Juice of lemon
    > > Lemon shell

    >
    > What is lemon shell?


    When you squeeze a half a lemon, the lemon then becomes the lemon
    shell. So put this in the sauce when you simmer.

    >
    > > Worcestershire Sauce
    > > Cayenne
    > > I've never added liquid smoke, but it might be a good addition; not
    > > too much.
    > > Simmer half hour. *Look on the web at related recipes for
    > > measurements.



  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    In article <4da8015e$0$25771$[email protected]>,
    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 4/14/2011 2:48 PM, Michael O'Connor wrote:
    > > I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    > > spare bedroom. I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    > > wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    > > detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. I smoked a whole
    > > chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.

    >
    > Hopefully, your smoke detector also detects CO. My dad used to smoke
    > meats for our annual Christmas shindig. He used coarse Hawaiian salt and
    > pepper. That's all. His smoker was a red 55 gal drum although in later
    > years he used a big red kamado.
    >
    > He'd smoke chicken and what I think must have been chuck steak. It was
    > great stuff and the meats would come out a deep reddish-pink color which
    > I think means there was a whole lot of CO produced in the smoker. Good
    > thing we didn't live in an apartment! I asked my dad where he learned to
    > cook like that and he told me it was just something he came up with. I
    > tried to do some smoking myself 10 years ago but never was any good at
    > it. That's the breaks.
    >
    > Methinks that you should maybe get a pet canary.


    Actually, you can now purchase a CO detector for a reasonable price.
    I worried about my dad having a gas furnace when he was living on his
    own and purchased one for him to hang near the furnace. It would nearly
    always go off for a few seconds when the furnace first turned on, then
    it would clear I guess...

    One more good reason I don't own any gas appliances.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  14. #14
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On 4/15/2011 2:58 AM, Omelet wrote:
    > In article<4da8015e$0$25771$[email protected]>,
    > dsi1<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Methinks that you should maybe get a pet canary.

    >
    > Actually, you can now purchase a CO detector for a reasonable price.
    > I worried about my dad having a gas furnace when he was living on his
    > own and purchased one for him to hang near the furnace. It would nearly
    > always go off for a few seconds when the furnace first turned on, then
    > it would clear I guess...
    >
    > One more good reason I don't own any gas appliances.


    We had a smoke detector that would go off in the middle of the night.
    I'd go downstairs to find nothing. That was strange. The rest of the
    family would be dead to the world and sound asleep. In a real fire,
    they'd pretty much be just dead.

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    In article <io9ti0$isn$[email protected]>,
    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 4/15/2011 2:58 AM, Omelet wrote:
    > > In article<4da8015e$0$25771$[email protected]>,
    > > dsi1<[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> Methinks that you should maybe get a pet canary.

    > >
    > > Actually, you can now purchase a CO detector for a reasonable price.
    > > I worried about my dad having a gas furnace when he was living on his
    > > own and purchased one for him to hang near the furnace. It would nearly
    > > always go off for a few seconds when the furnace first turned on, then
    > > it would clear I guess...
    > >
    > > One more good reason I don't own any gas appliances.

    >
    > We had a smoke detector that would go off in the middle of the night.
    > I'd go downstairs to find nothing. That was strange. The rest of the
    > family would be dead to the world and sound asleep. In a real fire,
    > they'd pretty much be just dead.


    Sometimes they will go off if the battery is nearly dead.
    All of mine "beep" periodically when the batteries are getting low.

    I replace all three of them when one starts doing that.

    Dust in the detector can also set it off sometimes. They should be
    dusted regularly.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  16. #16
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: How do you guys like your back ribs?

    On Apr 15, 3:25*am, dsi1 <d...@usenet-news.net> wrote:
    > On 4/14/2011 2:48 PM, Michael O'Connor wrote:
    >
    > > I live in an apartment so my smoker sits wrapped in a tarp in the
    > > spare bedroom. *I am still learning how to smoke in the oven using
    > > wood chips and foiling the smoking apparatus together to keep my smoke
    > > detector from going off and cooking it low and slow. *I smoked a whole
    > > chicken a couple weeks ago that turned out really good.

    >
    > Hopefully, your smoke detector also detects CO. My dad used to smoke
    > meats for our annual Christmas shindig. He used coarse Hawaiian salt and
    > pepper. That's all. His smoker was a red 55 gal drum although in later
    > years he used a big red kamado.
    >
    > He'd smoke chicken and what I think must have been chuck steak. It was
    > great stuff and the meats would come out a deep reddish-pink color which
    > I think means there was a whole lot of CO produced in the smoker. Good
    > thing we didn't live in an apartment! I asked my dad where he learned to
    > cook like that and he told me it was just something he came up with. I
    > tried to do some smoking myself 10 years ago but never was any good at
    > it. That's the breaks.
    >
    > Methinks that you should maybe get a pet canary.
    >

    Finches are much less pricey.

    --Bryan

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