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Thread: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

  1. #1
    Bigbazza Guest

    Default How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    From the manufacturers Web Site.......

    ..Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and firmed
    through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced. Natural
    Chilli is added to hot Coppa.

    I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price, due
    to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be consumed
    within 4 days of opening!

    That is all I know of it!

    Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and incorporated
    in some cooking?
    --
    Bigbazza (Barry) Oz

    "Happiness is never an accident. It is the prize we get when we choose
    wisely from life's great stores"







  2. #2
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    " Bigbazza" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > From the manufacturers Web Site.......
    >
    > .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and
    > firmed through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced.
    > Natural Chilli is added to hot Coppa.
    >
    > I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price,
    > due to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be
    > consumed within 4 days of opening!
    >
    > That is all I know of it!
    >
    > Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    > 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and
    > incorporated in some cooking?




    Gidday Baz,

    I've bought this before as well, just to see what it's like. It can be
    eaten as is in sandwiches, or used on pizzas, or (as I did) wrapped around
    some chicken and baked.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capicola

    http://www.marianofoods.com/cart/mea...b/prod_13.html

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  3. #3
    Catmandy (Sheryl) Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Sep 14, 11:04*pm, Aussie <Aus...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    wrote:
    > " *Bigbazza" <bigbaz...@lotsofspam.net> wrote innews:[email protected]:
    >
    > > *From the manufacturers Web Site.......

    >
    > > .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and
    > > firmed through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced.
    > > Natural Chilli is added to hot Coppa.

    >
    > > I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price,
    > > due to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be
    > > consumed within 4 days of opening!

    >
    > > That is all I know of it!

    >
    > > Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    > > 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and
    > > incorporated in some cooking?

    >
    > Gidday Baz,
    >
    > I've bought this before as well, just to see what it's like. It can be
    > eaten as is in sandwiches, or used on pizzas, or (as I did) wrapped around
    > some chicken and baked.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capicola
    >
    > http://www.marianofoods.com/cart/mea...1-5-lb/prod_13....
    >
    > --
    > Peter Lucas * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    > Hobart
    > Tasmania
    >
    > The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    > whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    > but only when done with love.


    Use it as you would deli Ham. It's frequently included in "Italian
    Combo" sandwiches here in the U.S.
    But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?
    Especially that large a quantity.... that's a lot of meat to eat in a
    4 day period. Capicola is very rich and you really can't eat a lot of
    it at one time. You might need to invite people over for "Italian
    Sandwich Night" and buy some hard salami, mortadella and sliced
    provolone to go along with it (about half as much of the other meats
    as the capicola).

  4. #4
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    " Bigbazza" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From the manufacturers Web Site.......
    >
    > .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and firmed
    > through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced. Natural
    > Chilli is added to hot Coppa.
    >
    > I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price, due
    > to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be consumed
    > within 4 days of opening!
    >
    > That is all I know of it!
    >
    > Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    > 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and incorporated
    > in some cooking?


    I buy very thinly sliced capicola from an Italian deli and use it in
    sandwiches. FWIW. I can't imagine heating or cooking it not the
    stuff I buy, anyway.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    A few pics from the Fair are here:
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254

  5. #5
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    "Catmandy (Sheryl)" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5545d5f4-9787-
    [email protected]:

    > On Sep 14, 11:04*pm, Aussie <Aus...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    > wrote:
    >> " *Bigbazza" <bigbaz...@lotsofspam.net> wrote innews:[email protected]

    > ndividual.net:
    >>
    >> > *From the manufacturers Web Site.......

    >>
    >> > .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and
    >> > firmed through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced.
    >> > Natural Chilli is added to hot Coppa.

    >>
    >> > I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price,
    >> > due to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be
    >> > consumed within 4 days of opening!

    >>
    >> > That is all I know of it!

    >>
    >> > Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    >> > 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and
    >> > incorporated in some cooking?

    >>
    >> Gidday Baz,
    >>
    >> I've bought this before as well, just to see what it's like. It can be
    >> eaten as is in sandwiches, or used on pizzas, or (as I did) wrapped aroun

    > d
    >> some chicken and baked.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capicola
    >>
    >> http://www.marianofoods.com/cart/mea...1-5-lb/prod_13....
    >>


    >
    > Use it as you would deli Ham. It's frequently included in "Italian
    > Combo" sandwiches here in the U.S.
    > But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    > inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?



    Life is an adventure, and good on Barry for buying something 'off the cuff'
    and trying it!!


    > Especially that large a quantity.... that's a lot of meat to eat in a
    > 4 day period.



    "Use within 4 days of opening" is an 'arse covering' statement.

    I had my Coppa in the fridge (after opening) for about 2 weeks, and we
    haven't died!!


    > Capicola is very rich and you really can't eat a lot of
    > it at one time. You might need to invite people over for "Italian
    > Sandwich Night" and buy some hard salami, mortadella and sliced
    > provolone to go along with it (about half as much of the other meats
    > as the capicola).
    >



    Or, he can get it sliced, and freeze it.

    It has been dry cured in salt, so use-by and best-by dates are rather hit and
    miss.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  6. #6
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > " Bigbazza" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> From the manufacturers Web Site.......
    >>
    >> .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and
    >> firmed through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced.
    >> Natural Chilli is added to hot Coppa.
    >>
    >> I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price,
    >> due to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be
    >> consumed within 4 days of opening!
    >>
    >> That is all I know of it!
    >>
    >> Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    >> 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and
    >> incorporated in some cooking?

    >
    > I buy very thinly sliced capicola from an Italian deli and use it in
    > sandwiches. FWIW. I can't imagine heating or cooking it not the
    > stuff I buy, anyway.
    >



    (A direct reference to my post, no doubt.... good to see you taking
    note!!)

    If you have an abundance, as Barry does, you can afford to experiment,
    rather than just be a dried up old stick in the mud and only do what is
    commonly done with it.

    Think outside the square, woman!!



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  7. #7
    Janet Guest

  8. #8
    Catmandy (Sheryl) Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Sep 15, 12:43*am, Aussie <Aus...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    wrote:
    > "Catmandy (Sheryl)" <catma...@optonline.net> wrote in news:5545d5f4-9787-
    > 4f58-a5f3-28ab9dd5a...@k11g2000vbf.googlegroups.com:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 14, 11:04*pm, Aussie <Aus...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    > > wrote:
    > >> " *Bigbazza" <bigbaz...@lotsofspam.net> wrote innews:[email protected]

    > > ndividual.net:

    >
    > >> > *From the manufacturers Web Site.......

    >
    > >> > .Made from a seasoned pork neck, the coppa is dry cured in salt and
    > >> > firmed through strict temperature control. Best served thinly sliced..
    > >> > Natural Chilli is added to hot Coppa.

    >
    > >> > I bought a 550g piece of this yesterday, it was 'Marked down' in price,
    > >> > due to it's approaching 'use by date'....... It say's that it must be
    > >> > consumed within 4 days of opening!

    >
    > >> > That is all I know of it!

    >
    > >> > Any suggestions as to how to use it?... Can it be eaten (as it is) in a
    > >> > 'cured' only state as bought, or must (or can) it be cooked and
    > >> > incorporated in some cooking?

    >
    > >> Gidday Baz,

    >
    > >> I've bought this before as well, just to see what it's like. It can be
    > >> eaten as is in sandwiches, or used on pizzas, or (as I did) wrapped aroun

    > > d
    > >> some chicken and baked.

    >
    > >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capicola

    >
    > >>http://www.marianofoods.com/cart/mea...1-5-lb/prod_13.....

    >
    > > Use it as you would deli Ham. It's frequently included in "Italian
    > > Combo" sandwiches here in the U.S.
    > > But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    > > inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?

    >
    > Life is an adventure, and good on Barry for buying something 'off the cuff'
    > and trying it!!
    >


    Adventurous is asking the guy in the deli for a taste before investing
    in half a kilo (more than a pound) of something you've no clue how to
    eat, or maybe buying a few slices to see if you like it. Whatever.
    DIfferent strokes for different folks.

  9. #9
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > I buy very thinly sliced capicola from an Italian deli and use it in
    > sandwiches. FWIW. I can't imagine heating or cooking it < not the
    > stuff I buy, anyway.


    In Italy both coppa and capocollo (or capicollo) are almost always served
    room temp, and not cooked. Then some fantasy-poor chef wraps them around the
    first thing he reaches for, like shrimp, and the result is a shrimp totally
    overpowered by the strong taste of coppa, not minding coppa is even saltier
    than prosciutto: or you just warm it up a very little, or it quckly gets too
    salty.
    They're both made for bread, as in a sandwich or in a dish of cold-cuts
    served with bread.
    Coppa can vary from very tough to quite soft, usually harder than a standard
    Parma ham.

    I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I grate it
    as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part of a meat sauce.
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone




  10. #10
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 15:25:20 +0200, "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >> I buy very thinly sliced capicola from an Italian deli and use it in
    >> sandwiches. FWIW. I can't imagine heating or cooking it < not the
    >> stuff I buy, anyway.

    >
    >In Italy both coppa and capocollo (or capicollo) are almost always served
    >room temp, and not cooked. Then some fantasy-poor chef wraps them around the
    >first thing he reaches for, like shrimp, and the result is a shrimp totally
    >overpowered by the strong taste of coppa, not minding coppa is even saltier
    >than prosciutto: or you just warm it up a very little, or it quckly gets too
    >salty.
    >They're both made for bread, as in a sandwich or in a dish of cold-cuts
    >served with bread.
    >Coppa can vary from very tough to quite soft, usually harder than a standard
    >Parma ham.
    >
    >I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I grate it
    >as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part of a meat sauce.


    Vilco, Is capicollo anything like sopresetta?

    Lou

  11. #11
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:i6qhg1$2qb$[email protected]:


    >
    > I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I
    > grate it as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part of a
    > meat sauce.




    I've used thin slices on pizza, and it was quite good.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  12. #12
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    >[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >says...
    >>
    >> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    >> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?

    >
    > Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    >guess many cooks do.


    I do it too. That's how I learned about ramiro peppers. Did the same
    with thing with fennel bulbs. I knew I liked the seeds so I bought a
    bulb and researched it just like the OP is doing.

    Lou

  13. #13
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    Lou Decruss wrote:

    >> I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I
    >> grate it as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part
    >> of a meat sauce.


    > Vilco, Is capicollo anything like sopresetta?


    Soppressata is made of ground meat, while capicollo is made of a whole cut.
    And sopressata tends to inherit a higher quantity of spices since they're
    ground in it, and not just rubbed over a whole piece of meat.
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone




  14. #14
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    Aussie wrote:

    >> I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I
    >> grate it as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part
    >> of a meat sauce.


    > I've used thin slices on pizza, and it was quite good.


    I sometimes do that, but I prefer to add the slices after the pizza gets out
    of the oven, like many here do with prosciutto. I love a coppa and
    gorgonzola sandwich
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone




  15. #15
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:i6ql4a$rl9$[email protected]:

    > Aussie wrote:
    >
    >>> I cook it only when it's near the end, about one inch thick: then I
    >>> grate it as fine as I can, and use it as the salty and savoury part
    >>> of a meat sauce.

    >
    >> I've used thin slices on pizza, and it was quite good.

    >
    > I sometimes do that, but I prefer to add the slices after the pizza gets
    > out of the oven, like many here do with prosciutto.



    I actually liked it after it had been heated/cooked a bit.


    > I love a coppa and
    > gorgonzola sandwich



    Now *that* is mega rich!!

    I don't think I could handle one of them.

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    >[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >says...
    >>
    >> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    >> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?

    >
    > Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    >guess many cooks do.
    >
    > Janet


    I do that most every time I grocery shop.

    Most folks buy all sorts of things they've never tried previously only
    because it looks interesting and the price is right... this concept is
    a major component of "Marketing".

    A few days ago while buying cat provisions at Walmart I noticed a
    display of 15 bean soup packets, the price looked right; $2.38/20 oz.
    I bought two, I have two meaty ham bones saved in my freezer. I never
    bought this product before but it looked interesting... I bought the
    Cajun variety:
    http://www.hurstbeans.com/products/2/cajun-15-bean-soup

    What I have to laugh at is the package says: Yield approximately 3
    quarts. Serves 14-16... LOL... to me 1 quart is 2 servings. That's
    why I bought two packages, I intend to cook both together... bean soup
    freezes well.


  17. #17
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 08:58:07 -0500, Lou Decruss
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    >>[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >>says...
    >>>
    >>> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    >>> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?

    >>
    >> Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    >> guess many cooks do.

    >
    > I do it too. Did the same with thing with fennel bulbs.
    > I knew I liked the seeds so I bought a bulb and researched
    > it just like the OP is doing.


    But did you taste it, did you like it... ya know, if you like Florence
    fennel (finocchio) it means you have homosexual tendencies.
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...term=finocchio


  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 12:23:13 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    >On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 08:58:07 -0500, Lou Decruss
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    >>>[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >>>says...
    >>>>
    >>>> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    >>>> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?
    >>>
    >>> Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    >>> guess many cooks do.

    >>
    >> I do it too. Did the same with thing with fennel bulbs.
    >> I knew I liked the seeds so I bought a bulb and researched
    >> it just like the OP is doing.

    >
    >But did you taste it, did you like it... ya know, if you like Florence
    >fennel (finocchio) it means you have homosexual tendencies.
    >http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...term=finocchio

    -
    -
    -
    Btw, I meant to mention that fennel seeds are from a different plant
    than the fennel bulb plant. The fennel plant that produces culinary
    fennel seed is highly invasive, do not plant it, you will rue the day
    and your neighbors will kill you.

  19. #19
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    says...
    >
    > On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 08:58:07 -0500, Lou Decruss
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    > >>[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > >>says...
    > >>>
    > >>> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    > >>> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?
    > >>
    > >> Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    > >> guess many cooks do.

    > >
    > > I do it too. Did the same with thing with fennel bulbs.
    > > I knew I liked the seeds so I bought a bulb and researched
    > > it just like the OP is doing.

    >
    > But did you taste it, did you like it... ya know, if you like Florence
    > fennel (finocchio) it means you have homosexual tendencies.


    I like some gay men, does that count?

    Janet



  20. #20
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: How is Coppa 'Capocollo' Eaten or used in Cooking?

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 19:08:06 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    >says...
    >>
    >> On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 08:58:07 -0500, Lou Decruss
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 13:23:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>In article <5545d5f4-9787-4f58-a5f3-
    >> >>[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >> >>says...
    >> >>>
    >> >>> But a bigger question is, why would you buy something (no matter how
    >> >>> inexpensive) if you didn't know what to do with it or how to eat it?
    >> >>
    >> >> Because he likes to try new food? I've done that all my life, I'd
    >> >> guess many cooks do.
    >> >
    >> > I do it too. Did the same with thing with fennel bulbs.
    >> > I knew I liked the seeds so I bought a bulb and researched
    >> > it just like the OP is doing.

    >>
    >> But did you taste it, did you like it... ya know, if you like Florence
    >> fennel (finocchio) it means you have homosexual tendencies.

    >
    > I like some gay men, does that count?
    >
    > Janet


    Counts if you turn them straight! hehe

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