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Thread: Hot crock

  1. #1
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Hot crock

    Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.

    Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.

    Does anybody here do that?

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon wrote:


    >> Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >> cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >> cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >> uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.


    >> Is that safe?


    >Many of those crocks now are made out of a phenolic resin of some sort
    >(plastic). And the older ceramic/stone ones can contain moisture that
    >will make them bust up under high heat due to water/heat/steam
    >expansion.


    >I think it's a Bad Idea to demonstrate and promote that on TV.


    Possibly even Evil.

    Especially since Mr. Bayless doesn't have to clean up the mess when
    a pot explodes.



    Steve

  3. #3
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock


    "David Harmon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    > Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    > cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    > cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    > uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >
    > Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    > stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    > middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    > Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >
    > Does anybody here do that?


    I highly doubt that's safe. When you need to brown meat you are supposed to
    do it in a pan and then put it in the crock-pot.



  4. #4
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Dec 24, 10:08*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon wrote:
    > > Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    > > cooker. *But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    > > cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. *When it is good and hot,he
    > > uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.

    >
    > > Is that safe?

    >
    > Many of those crocks now are made out of a phenolic resin of some sort
    > (plastic). *And the older ceramic/stone ones can contain moisture that
    > will make them bust up under high heat due to water/heat/steam
    > expansion.
    >
    > I think it's a Bad Idea to demonstrate and promote that on TV.


    I second that. I've shattered Pyrex on a stove top. Even my Corning
    Ware doesn't get subjected to extremes.

    Brown in metal, and deglaze. It's not that much extra trouble. The
    Pyrex incident happened while making gravy from a deer shank someone
    had given me. The thing shattered into a thousand tiny pieces. We
    refer to the incident as, "Bambi's Revenge." Scared the **** out of
    my wife and I.
    >
    > -sw


    --Bryan

  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I second that. I've shattered Pyrex on a stove top. Even my Corning
    >Ware doesn't get subjected to extremes.


    >Brown in metal, and deglaze. It's not that much extra trouble. The
    >Pyrex incident happened while making gravy from a deer shank someone
    >had given me. The thing shattered into a thousand tiny pieces. We
    >refer to the incident as, "Bambi's Revenge." Scared the **** out of
    >my wife and I.


    This is where enamel cast iron shines. Stovetop to oven, no problem,
    no rick of break-up. (Not saying it never happens, but damned rarely.)

    Wouldn't braise anything without Le Crueset or generic equlivalent.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jd6hq0$jb2$[email protected]..
    >
    > "David Harmon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] m...
    >> Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >> cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >> cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >> uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>
    >> Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >> stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >> middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >> Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >>
    >> Does anybody here do that?

    >
    > I highly doubt that's safe. When you need to brown meat you are supposed
    > to do it in a pan and then put it in the crock-pot.


    We had a crockpot (of some brand) that could go on the stove top and then
    oven or slow cooking unit. It was much too large to be a keeper here and it
    went home with the offspring. So. I'm thinking with you all; he shouldn't
    be demonstrating that when methinks most crockpots would crack or explode.
    Polly
    >
    >



  7. #7
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 22:08:37 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon wrote:
    >
    >> Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >> cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >> cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >> uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>
    >> Is that safe?

    >
    >Many of those crocks now are made out of a phenolic resin of some sort
    >(plastic).


    At stove top searing temps plastic would melt, then ignite.

    >And the older ceramic/stone ones can contain moisture that
    >will make them bust up under high heat due to water/heat/steam
    >expansion.
    >
    >I think it's a Bad Idea to demonstrate and promote that on TV.


    Most of what's shown on foodtv nowadays is worthless claptrap... I
    gave up watching some fifteen years ago. Occasionally I'll turn to a
    foodtv station (my cable offers three), after less than five minutes I
    move on... it's all about designer kitchens and pricey/pretentious
    acouterments.

  8. #8
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On 12/24/2011 8:43 PM, David Harmon wrote:
    > Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    > cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    > cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    > uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >
    > Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    > stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    > middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    > Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >
    > Does anybody here do that?



    The manuals from my slow cookers don't say anything about it. As far as
    I know, "Crock Pot" liners are real crockery, but I wouldn't use them on
    the stove top any sooner than I'd put any piece of crockery designed for
    slow sustained heating onto a source of high intense heat. It doesn't
    make sense to do so. It isn't made for that.

    Besides, as they are somewhat narrow and high-sided vessels, they don't
    have the right layout for browning and searing. It would take forever to
    get anything browned/seared in there, since it would take several
    batches to avoid crowding and steaming.

  9. #9
    k[email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >
    >Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >
    >Does anybody here do that?


    I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    browning etc...It runs about $295.00

    I can't remember if it's a Cuisinart or a Calphalon, one of the two.

    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  10. #10
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 10:39:26 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >>cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >>cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >>uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>
    >>Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >>stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >>middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >>Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >>
    >>Does anybody here do that?

    >
    >I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    >Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    >browning etc...It runs about $295.00
    >
    >I can't remember if it's a Cuisinart or a Calphalon, one of the two.
    >
    >koko


    It's a Cuisinart. I saw Ming Tsai using it too, and was intrigued.
    Maybe some day I will spring for one like that..

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 11:48:30 -0700, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 10:39:26 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >>>cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >>>cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >>>uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>>
    >>>Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >>>stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >>>middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >>>Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >>>
    >>>Does anybody here do that?

    >>
    >>I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    >>Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    >>browning etc...It runs about $295.00
    >>
    >>I can't remember if it's a Cuisinart or a Calphalon, one of the two.
    >>
    >>koko

    >
    >It's a Cuisinart. I saw Ming Tsai using it too, and was intrigued.
    >Maybe some day I will spring for one like that..
    >
    >Christine


    A $300 slow cooker... have you lost your mind?!?!?
    See, that's why I gave up watching foodtv, it's all about selling
    pretentious useless kitchenware.

  12. #12
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 10:39:26 -0800 in rec.food.cooking,
    [email protected] wrote,
    >I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    >Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    >browning etc...It runs about $295.00


    I guess Bayless would have mentioned it if it was a special wonderful
    expensive crock pot. ;-)

  13. #13
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 11:48:30 -0700, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 10:39:26 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon <[email protected]>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >>>>cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >>>>cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >>>>uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>>>
    >>>>Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >>>>stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >>>>middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >>>>Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >>>>
    >>>>Does anybody here do that?
    >>>
    >>>I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    >>>Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    >>>browning etc...It runs about $295.00
    >>>
    >>>I can't remember if it's a Cuisinart or a Calphalon, one of the two.
    >>>
    >>>koko

    >>
    >>It's a Cuisinart. I saw Ming Tsai using it too, and was intrigued.
    >>Maybe some day I will spring for one like that..
    >>
    >>Christine

    >
    > A $300 slow cooker... have you lost your mind?!?!?
    > See, that's why I gave up watching foodtv, it's all about selling
    > pretentious useless kitchenware.


    A lot of crock-pots have come up in price but you can still get some cheap
    ones. My first was something like $19.99. I know because I had to replace
    it after a few months. It quit heating. That apparently was a problem with
    them in earlier days because I had roommates who had them and they did the
    same thing. I paid more money for a useless rack designed to keep the meats
    from touching the bottom and a pan that could be used for baking cakes and
    breads. I did make many a loaf of bread in there but I always wished I had
    a second pot for the soup to go with it. The pot itself was a poor design
    in those days because it wasn't removable making it pretty hard to clean.

    My first pot with a removable crock was a display model bought on clearance
    at the military store. It only cost a wee bit more than my other one and
    was a bit larger. I soon learned that I needed two pots because to do roast
    beef and veggies took up the whole pot and there were no leftovers. I soon
    learned that I needed one for the meat and another for the veggies. And I
    learned that today's meat is a lot leaner. The original roasts that I did
    gave off soooo much grease I had to spend a lot of time defatting the
    resulting broth. I no longer need to do that.

    Then I discovered a crock-pot recipe site and learned that I really needed
    the 6 quart which I now own. I also own a little one for dips.

    But there are all sorts of other ones out there with more features. Which I
    suppose if I had a big family and if I worked outside of the home, I might
    want. If I worked all the time I probably wouldn't mind spending that much.
    But now for something I only use once in a while, no way.



  14. #14
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Hot crock

    On 12/25/2011 12:39 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 19:43:24 -0800, David Harmon<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Watching Rick Bayless just now, he is going to cook some pork in a slow
    >> cooker. But first, he takes the (apparently) ceramic crock out of the
    >> cooker and puts in on top of the gas stove. When it is good and hot, he
    >> uses it to brown the pork in some oil, before putting it back to cook.
    >>
    >> Is that safe? I would be afraid that heating the crock on top of the
    >> stove would be uneven and risk having it crack in two right down the
    >> middle. I don't remember anything in the skimpy instructions from my
    >> Hamilton Beach cooker that would suggest that procedure.
    >>
    >> Does anybody here do that?

    >
    > I saw that crock pot in a catalog, can't remember if it's a William
    > Sonoma or Sur la Table. The insert can be used on top of the stove for
    > browning etc...It runs about $295.00
    >


    whatever brand it is, it's to expensive for me.
    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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