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Thread: Horseradish greens

  1. #1
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Horseradish greens

    Yesterday was my annual "chase the horseradish back to where it
    belongs" day in the garden. I harvested enough for three pint jars of
    prepared eye-watering wonderfulness. It is really pungent stuff - I
    wonder if spring horseradish is hotter than that harvested at other
    times of year (anyone know?)

    Anyway, I've always wondered about the leaves. Right now, they're
    young and tender. Raw, they taste rather sharp, like horseradish
    (duh!), and might be good in salads in small quantities. When cooked,
    the sharpness goes away and they develop a mild but still interesting
    flavor.

    I made this for dinner last night:

    http://www.eatweeds.co.uk/horseradis...ble-and-squeak

    and it was very good!

    So, horseradish greens are now on my list of good things to eat -
    which is good since I certainly have no shortage of them!

    --
    Silvar Beitel

  2. #2
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    Silvar Beitel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yesterday was my annual "chase the horseradish back to where it
    >belongs" day in the garden. I harvested enough for three pint jars of
    >prepared eye-watering wonderfulness. It is really pungent stuff - I
    >wonder if spring horseradish is hotter than that harvested at other
    >times of year (anyone know?)
    >


    That *is* what I've always been told. OTOH- like you, I think we all
    'harvest in self-defense' in the spring.<g>

    My dad's rule of thumb was that horseradish should be harvested while
    the shrimp were being prepared.-- in other words, fresh is best, at
    any time.

    >Anyway, I've always wondered about the leaves. Right now, they're
    >young and tender. Raw, they taste rather sharp, like horseradish
    >(duh!), and might be good in salads in small quantities. When cooked,
    >the sharpness goes away and they develop a mild but still interesting
    >flavor.
    >
    >I made this for dinner last night:
    >
    >http://www.eatweeds.co.uk/horseradis...ble-and-squeak
    >
    >and it was very good!
    >
    >So, horseradish greens are now on my list of good things to eat -
    >which is good since I certainly have no shortage of them!


    I had also heard that the leaves, like rhubarb's, were poisonous. I
    can't find any substantiation for that, so I guess I'll join you in
    some horseradish greens.

    Thanks-
    Jim


  3. #3
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    In article <75c50e36-5c5b-44b3-8ef5-d4e52fbcbec1
    @e21g2000vbz.googlegroups.com>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > Yesterday was my annual "chase the horseradish back to where it
    > belongs" day in the garden. I harvested enough for three pint jars of
    > prepared eye-watering wonderfulness. It is really pungent stuff - I
    > wonder if spring horseradish is hotter than that harvested at other
    > times of year (anyone know?)
    >
    > Anyway, I've always wondered about the leaves. Right now, they're
    > young and tender. Raw, they taste rather sharp, like horseradish
    > (duh!), and might be good in salads in small quantities. When cooked,
    > the sharpness goes away and they develop a mild but still interesting
    > flavor.
    >
    > I made this for dinner last night:
    >
    > http://www.eatweeds.co.uk/horseradis...ble-and-squeak
    >
    > and it was very good!
    >
    > So, horseradish greens are now on my list of good things to eat -
    > which is good since I certainly have no shortage of them!


    Never heard that before but shall certainly try it! tip.

    Janet

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On Sat, 7 May 2011 06:25:07 -0700 (PDT), Silvar Beitel wrote:

    > Yesterday was my annual "chase the horseradish back to where it
    > belongs" day in the garden. I harvested enough for three pint jars of
    > prepared eye-watering wonderfulness. It is really pungent stuff - I
    > wonder if spring horseradish is hotter than that harvested at other
    > times of year (anyone know?)


    My experience with home made horseradish is that it's only hot for a
    day or three. How did you prepare it?

    -sw

  5. #5
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On May 7, 4:35 pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:

    > My experience with home made horseradish is that it's only hot for a
    > day or three. How did you prepare it?


    Washed it, scraped it with a vegetable peeler, cut it into coarse
    chunks, tossed it into the food processor with "some" white vinegar,
    whizzed until the consistency I like (roughly like what you get in
    bottled stuff in the supermarket), adding more white vinegar "as
    necessary."

    I made some sour cream / horseradish sauce for lunch. 3 T sour cream,
    1 T mayo, 1/4 cup or so above prepared horseradish. Slathered
    generously on a rare roast beef sandwich in a toasted whole-wheat
    pita. To die for.

    I will finish consuming the first 1/2 pint in short order. (Doing a
    roast turkey for Mother's Day and guest visitors, looking forward to
    turkey sandwiches Monday, etc. - there is nothing better!) The rest
    has already been packaged in old baby food jars and tossed into the
    freezer (the slush freezes without breaking the glass). It comes out
    of the freezer as pungent as it went in, so I'm good for the summer.

    --
    Silvar Beitel

  6. #6
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On Sat, 7 May 2011 06:25:07 -0700 (PDT), Silvar Beitel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yesterday was my annual "chase the horseradish back to where it
    >belongs" day in the garden. I harvested enough for three pint jars of
    >prepared eye-watering wonderfulness. It is really pungent stuff - I
    >wonder if spring horseradish is hotter than that harvested at other
    >times of year (anyone know?)
    >

    snip
    Do you have a time when you actually plant roots to obtain largest and
    not crooked roots? Or do you just let the stuff wander?
    Janet

  7. #7
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On May 7, 6:57 pm, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:

    > Do you have a time when you actually plant roots to obtain largest and
    > not crooked roots? Or do you just let the stuff wander?


    The latter. Yes, much of it turns out crooked or otherwise a pain in
    the butt to clean/scrape, but it can be broken into manageable pieces
    and besides, if you have lots of it, wastage for convenience is not a
    problem.

    I think we first planted horseradish roots in that part of the garden
    around 20 years ago. It has been doing its thing ever since.

    It has co-mingled with some of the asparagus and oddly enough, that
    particular patch of asparagus has been a robust producer for many
    years.

    If one really wants more horseradish, all one has to do is cut about
    the upper inch of root and green off and toss it in a six-inch deep
    hole somewhere else. And do nothing to it except wait a year or two.
    The stuff is indestructible. As a matter of fact, I have a bag full
    of tops from this last gathering that I'm thinking of sowing down near
    the site of our old compost heap. If you want 'em, come and get 'em -
    MA/NH border, USA. :-)

    --
    Silvar Beitel

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On Sat, 7 May 2011 14:46:34 -0700 (PDT), Silvar Beitel wrote:

    > On May 7, 4:35 pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >
    >> My experience with home made horseradish is that it's only hot for a
    >> day or three. How did you prepare it?

    >
    > Washed it, scraped it with a vegetable peeler, cut it into coarse
    > chunks, tossed it into the food processor with "some" white vinegar,
    > whizzed until the consistency I like (roughly like what you get in
    > bottled stuff in the supermarket), adding more white vinegar "as
    > necessary."


    Same as how I did mine and it lost it's heat completely within a week.
    I've heard the food processor is what kills it. You supposedly want
    to pound it, or something that doesn't cut all the cells and release
    all the heat.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Horseradish greens

    On Sat, 7 May 2011 17:11:53 -0700 (PDT), Silvar Beitel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On May 7, 6:57 pm, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Do you have a time when you actually plant roots to obtain largest and
    >> not crooked roots? Or do you just let the stuff wander?

    >
    >The latter. Yes, much of it turns out crooked or otherwise a pain in
    >the butt to clean/scrape, but it can be broken into manageable pieces
    >and besides, if you have lots of it, wastage for convenience is not a
    >problem.
    >
    >I think we first planted horseradish roots in that part of the garden
    >around 20 years ago. It has been doing its thing ever since.
    >
    >It has co-mingled with some of the asparagus and oddly enough, that
    >particular patch of asparagus has been a robust producer for many
    >years.
    >
    >If one really wants more horseradish, all one has to do is cut about
    >the upper inch of root and green off and toss it in a six-inch deep
    >hole somewhere else. And do nothing to it except wait a year or two.
    >The stuff is indestructible. As a matter of fact, I have a bag full
    >of tops from this last gathering that I'm thinking of sowing down near
    >the site of our old compost heap. If you want 'em, come and get 'em -
    >MA/NH border, USA. :-)


    I was careless with mine last year. It was late fall, I wanted to do
    horseradish and the darn stuff had wound itself into a ball in and
    around some old grape roots. I got sufficient for making sauce for
    myself and to give, but I never got around to replanting the pieces. I
    thought it was gone. However, this spring all kinds of little shoots
    appeared and now the stuff seems smugly content. I think I'm going to
    move some of it over next to the walking onions and let them fight it
    out. Thanks for the info.
    Janet US

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