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Thread: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

  1. #1
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    thin on one end.
    Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?



    Kalmia wrote:
    > I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    > knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > thin on one end.
    > Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >
    > Thanks.


    Lightly freeze.

    Not so solid it would take a band saw to cut through, but if just
    beginning to ice up and a small toothed serrated knife were used?

    A professionals sharp butcher knife would probly work also.

    Possibly even well frozen and a serrated bread knife or clean hack saw
    blade were used, might be worth while if doing a lot.

    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  3. #3
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?


    "Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    > knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > thin on one end.
    > Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >
    > Thanks.


    Half freeze them. Then they will cut much easier.

    Paul



  4. #4
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 16:18:50 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    >knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >thin on one end.
    >Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >

    All you need is a sharp 8"-9" chefs knife, a cutting board and steady
    hands. Place the meat on the board, lightly but firmly press your
    palm on the meat with the palm taught and fingers flexed upward...
    then slice through the meat with the blade parallel to the board and
    the edge very slightly sloped downward... do not push, slice... you
    will be able to feel the blade work its way through the meat with your
    palm as you slice through exerting cutting pressure as you draw the
    blade towards yourself. I know this sounds scary but it really is
    very simple... try with a thicker piece of meat until you gain
    confidence. Make your slices working up from the board. Once you get
    the hang of it you will be able to easily make paper thin slices and
    wonder why you never did this before. The trick is not to have anyone
    in the kitchen to distract you, no one should be in the kitchen with
    you whenever you're doing knife work of any kind. In fact there
    should be no talking when working with food, aside from the
    conversation robbing your concentration when people talk they spit, I
    know I don't want spittle on my food. When you're at the deli and the
    clerks are carrying on a conversastion it's best not to shop there...
    I don't mind a gal spitting on my pepperoni but not near the slicer.
    heheh

  5. #5
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Nov 29, 4:18 pm, Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    > I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > board and the scraper - didn't work.


    Your left hand, assuming you have the knife in your right, works
    better than something like the scraper. Just place it flat on the
    chop to hold it in place. Don't press down hard, that just inhibits
    the knife's cutting. Then use the horizontal knife to slice the
    chop. As Sheldon says, use a slicing action, a back and forth motion,
    not just a push.

    > I finally used the electric
    > knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > thin on one end.


    The electric knives I've seen are serrated -- saws, really, not knives
    -- and do a lousy job. You want scallopine or thin cutlets to be cut
    cleanly, not all chewed up.

    > Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.


    There's really only one answer: sharpen your knife. -aem




  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 16:18:50 -0800 (PST), Kalmia wrote:

    > I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    > knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > thin on one end.
    > Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.


    For pork loin (what you're calling pork chop eyes), you can
    partially freeze, then cut vertically the normal way.

    -sw

  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 17:13:37 -0800 (PST), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Nov 29, 4:18 pm, Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    >> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >> board and the scraper - didn't work.

    >
    > Your left hand, assuming you have the knife in your right, works
    >better than something like the scraper. Just place it flat on the
    >chop to hold it in place. Don't press down hard, that just inhibits
    >the knife's cutting. Then use the horizontal knife to slice the
    >chop. As Sheldon says, use a slicing action, a back and forth motion,
    >not just a push.
    >
    >> I finally used the electric
    >> knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >> thin on one end.

    >
    >The electric knives I've seen are serrated -- saws, really, not knives
    >-- and do a lousy job. You want scallopine or thin cutlets to be cut
    >cleanly, not all chewed up.
    >
    >> Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.

    >
    >There's really only one answer: sharpen your knife. -aem
    >
    >

    And partially freezing is not only very foodtv amateurish
    (professional cooks would never consider such idiocy), freezing also
    extracts moisture, yielding dry cutlets. But mostly slicing through
    ice crystals is very dangerous... if you don't want to end up in the
    ER and possibly lose full use of a hand for the rest of your life by
    severing a nerve never attempt to slice any degree of frozen meat. If
    you're a newbie and not sure of your knife prowess then dust your
    board with flour to make things less slippery, be sure your knife is
    truly sharp, and deep six any serrated knives. Professionals don't
    own any serrated knives... even bread knives are not serrated, they're
    scalloped. And whenever you patronize a steak house and they provide
    serrated knives leave.... serrated knives are for pruning light wood
    in the garden, not for slicing meat. The only serrated knife
    permitted in a kitchen is a grapefruit knife.


  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    > knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > thin on one end.
    > Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >
    > Thanks.


    I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    (slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    "mash" when I'm slicing.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  9. #9
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 22:22:05 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article
    ><[email protected]>,
    > Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >> board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    >> knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >> thin on one end.
    >> Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    >I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    >(slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    >"mash" when I'm slicing.


    For jerky you want dry meat... and thin strips are much easier to
    slice than cutlets... actually there should be no need to freeze meat
    for slicing thin strips.



  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 17:13:37 -0800 (PST), aem wrote:

    > On Nov 29, 4:18 pm, Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    >> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >> board and the scraper - didn't work.

    >
    > Your left hand, assuming you have the knife in your right, works
    > better than something like the scraper. Just place it flat on the
    > chop to hold it in place. Don't press down hard, that just inhibits
    > the knife's cutting. Then use the horizontal knife to slice the
    > chop. As Sheldon says, use a slicing action, a back and forth motion,
    > not just a push.
    >
    >> I finally used the electric
    >> knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >> thin on one end.

    >
    > The electric knives I've seen are serrated -- saws, really, not knives
    > -- and do a lousy job. You want scallopine or thin cutlets to be cut
    > cleanly, not all chewed up.
    >
    >> Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.

    >
    > There's really only one answer: sharpen your knife. -aem


    i find that a boning knife works best for this rather than a chef's. and
    yes, sharpness helps.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 22:22:05 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article
    > ><[email protected]>,
    > > Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    > >> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    > >> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > >> board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    > >> knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > >> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > >> thin on one end.
    > >> Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks.

    > >
    > >I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    > >(slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    > >"mash" when I'm slicing.

    >
    > For jerky you want dry meat... and thin strips are much easier to
    > slice than cutlets... actually there should be no need to freeze meat
    > for slicing thin strips.


    It really is MUCH easier Sheldon.
    Try it. I dare you. ;-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    garden-variety dick Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Nov 30, 1:43*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <gtj7h5dsk3okl28kki1lsvn1c11hcj7...@4ax.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    > *brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > > On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 22:22:05 -0600, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > > >In article
    > > ><df5b2041-4866-4ea0-92d6-3594caa45...@m38g2000yqd.googlegroups.com>,
    > > > Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:

    >
    > > >> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. *I wanted it
    > > >> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. * Tried to flatten the meat with
    > > >> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    > > >> board and the scraper - didn't work. *I finally used the electric
    > > >> knife, *and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    > > >> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    > > >> thin on one end.
    > > >> Any suggestions? *I didn't want to use the mallet method.

    >
    > > >> Thanks.

    >
    > > >I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    > > >(slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    > > >"mash" when I'm slicing.

    >
    > > For jerky you want dry meat... and thin strips are much easier to
    > > slice than cutlets... actually there should be no need to freeze meat
    > > for slicing thin strips.

    >
    > It really is MUCH easier Sheldon.
    > Try it. I dare you. ;-)
    > --


    I thought you were sent on a mission. The mission is that of a rescue
    dog. I guess that other canines got there ahead of you. Omlete,
    you're a braggart pig. And a pig that's afraid of a fight.

    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down." *
    > --Steve Rothstein
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > recfoodreci...@yahoogroups.com
    > Subscribe: recfoodrecipes-subscr...@yahoogroups.com



  13. #13
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 16:18:50 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >>uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >>the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >>board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    >>knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >>some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >>thin on one end.
    >>Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >>

    > All you need is a sharp 8"-9" chefs knife, a cutting board and steady
    > hands. Place the meat on the board, lightly but firmly press your
    > palm on the meat with the palm taught and fingers flexed upward...
    > then slice through the meat with the blade parallel to the board and
    > the edge very slightly sloped downward... do not push, slice... you
    > will be able to feel the blade work its way through the meat with your
    > palm as you slice through exerting cutting pressure as you draw the
    > blade towards yourself. I know this sounds scary but it really is
    > very simple... try with a thicker piece of meat until you gain
    > confidence. Make your slices working up from the board. Once you get
    > the hang of it you will be able to easily make paper thin slices and
    > wonder why you never did this before. The trick is not to have anyone
    > in the kitchen to distract you, no one should be in the kitchen with
    > you whenever you're doing knife work of any kind. In fact there
    > should be no talking when working with food, aside from the
    > conversation robbing your concentration when people talk they spit, I
    > know I don't want spittle on my food. When you're at the deli and the
    > clerks are carrying on a conversastion it's best not to shop there...
    > I don't mind a gal spitting on my pepperoni but not near the slicer.
    > heheh
    >
    >

    I think the chef's knife is too thick for that. I'd use a 12" thin slicing
    knife for that.




  14. #14
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote
    > i find that a boning knife works best for this rather than a chef's. and
    > yes, sharpness helps.


    That is the long skinny one, right? That is what I use. P.S. You said
    "boning."



  15. #15
    Evil Fake Hampster Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    cybercat wrote:

    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> i find that a boning knife works best for this rather than a chef's.
    >> and yes, sharpness helps.

    >
    > That is the long skinny one, right? That is what I use. P.S. You said
    > "boning."



    You give ME a "boner", mon petite cyperhussy...!!!

    :-)


    --
    Best
    Greg Morrow



  16. #16
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Mon, 30 Nov 2009 14:44:27 -0500, cybercat wrote:

    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> i find that a boning knife works best for this rather than a chef's. and
    >> yes, sharpness helps.

    >
    > That is the long skinny one, right? That is what I use. P.S. You said
    > "boning."


    all part of subliminal fiendish plan.

    your pal,
    boris

  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Mon, 30 Nov 2009 12:43:57 -0600, Omelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 22:22:05 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article
    >>><[email protected]>,
    >>> Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I tried to slice some pork chop eyes on the horizontal. I wanted it
    >>>> uniformly thin for a pork scallopine. Tried to flatten the meat with
    >>>> the metal dough scraper and use a sharp knife inserted between cutting
    >>>> board and the scraper - didn't work. I finally used the electric
    >>>> knife, and, holding it at a 45 degree angle, managed to slice off
    >>>> some meat, but it was thinner than wanted and tapered down to tissue
    >>>> thin on one end.
    >>>> Any suggestions? I didn't want to use the mallet method.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    >>>(slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    >>>"mash" when I'm slicing.

    >>
    >> For jerky you want dry meat... and thin strips are much easier to
    >> slice than cutlets... actually there should be no need to freeze meat
    >> for slicing thin strips.

    >
    > It really is MUCH easier Sheldon.
    > Try it. I dare you. ;-)


    i see this tip all over the place, but mostly for cutting thin strips as
    for chinese food. i usually can't be bothered; if you have a sharp knife,
    it shouldn't be necessary.

    i have used it while cutting paper-thin slices for sukiyaki, but even then
    turning the meat around from less-frozen end to more-frozen end
    periodically, if that makes sense. but i can't see it being helpful for a
    horizontal cut, as the edges will be less frozen than the middle.

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 30 Nov 2009 14:44:27 -0500, cybercat wrote:
    >
    >> "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>> i find that a boning knife works best for this rather than a chef's.
    >>> and
    >>> yes, sharpness helps.

    >>
    >> That is the long skinny one, right? That is what I use. P.S. You said
    >> "boning."

    >
    > all part of subliminal fiendish plan.
    >
    > your pal,
    > boris


    Yeah, well I got your horizontal slice right here, big guy. winkwink



  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    In article <tmnd454sr8oj$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >>>I slice meat thin and evenly to make jerky. I slice it partially frozen
    > >>>(slightly crunchy) so it's soft enough to slice, but solid enough to not
    > >>>"mash" when I'm slicing.
    > >>
    > >> For jerky you want dry meat... and thin strips are much easier to
    > >> slice than cutlets... actually there should be no need to freeze meat
    > >> for slicing thin strips.

    > >
    > > It really is MUCH easier Sheldon.
    > > Try it. I dare you. ;-)

    >
    > i see this tip all over the place, but mostly for cutting thin strips as
    > for chinese food. i usually can't be bothered; if you have a sharp knife,
    > it shouldn't be necessary.


    Perhaps... but thin and even is _critical_ for properly made jerky.
    This takes the guesswork out of it, and it's easier and faster.

    As my brother in law likes to say:

    "Work smarter not harder".

    ;-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Horizontal meat slicing technique?

    On Tue, 1 Dec 2009 14:34:59 -0500, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >but i can't see it being helpful for a
    >horizontal cut, as the edges will be less frozen than the middle.


    Meat freezes from the inside out?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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