Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 48

Thread: Homemade peanut butter machines

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Homemade peanut butter machines

    With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    heard its cheaper too.

    Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    think it's worth buying or not.

    Thanks

    His Wife

  2. #2
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    [email protected] wrote:
    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.


    Which machines? A food processor...or perhaps a blender? I think you can
    make peanut butter with either.

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.


    You heard wrong. And you're not any safer making your own PB.

    -sw

  4. #4
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    [email protected] wrote:
    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    >
    > Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > think it's worth buying or not.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > His Wife


    Nope, not cheaper, after buying all those peanuts.
    Your fear is unfounded, and major pb brands are fine, but you could buy
    local natural peanut butter.
    Now is the best time to buy commercial peanut butter!



  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    > His Wife


    I've used a food processor to make cashew butter. The texture isn't as
    smooth but it's acceptable. And tasty.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller

  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    In article <4992cd09$[email protected]>,
    "dejablues" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Nope, not cheaper, after buying all those peanuts.
    > Your fear is unfounded, and major pb brands are fine, but you could buy
    > local natural peanut butter.
    > Now is the best time to buy commercial peanut butter!


    Hear, hear! I'm going to load up for the local food shelf.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    On Feb 11, 9:52*am, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > In article <4992cd0...@news.x-privat.org>,
    >
    > *"dejablues" <dejabl...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > Nope, not cheaper, after buying all those peanuts.
    > > Your fear is unfounded, and major pb brands are fine, but you could buy
    > > local natural peanut butter.
    > > Now is the best time to buy commercial peanut butter!

    >
    > Hear, hear! *I'm going to load up for the local food shelf.
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.me.com/barbschallerhttp://gallery.me.com/barbschaller


    If you live in the approp climate( US southeast for example) - you
    could grow your own peanuts and enjoy knowing the entire lifecycle of
    your PB.


  8. #8
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines



    Goomba wrote:
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > > heard its cheaper too.

    >
    > Which machines? A food processor...or perhaps a blender? I think you can
    > make peanut butter with either.


    We make our peanut butter with the grinder attachment for the KA. Works
    better than the food processor. The peanuts are dry-roasted in large
    tins from the big box places; usually need to add a spoon of peanut oil
    to get the right consistency. Takes abut 10 minutes or so to make a
    batch.

  9. #9
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines


    On 11-Feb-2009, [email protected] wrote:

    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    >
    > Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > think it's worth buying or not.


    Once upon a time, I owned a Salton Nut Butter Maker. The best reason to own
    one is not food safety (more on that in a moment); rather, it allows you to
    make peanut butter without added fat, sugar, emulsifiers and preservatives.


    The downsides: The machine is hard to clean and you will likely have old
    bits of nut-goo sticking around somewhere inside, just waiting to
    contaminate your next batch - be prepared to spend far more time cleaning
    the machine than in grinding peanuts. Because it is a PITA to clean, you'll
    be tempted to grind larger batches each time. Sadly, if you don't use the
    nut butter quickly, it separates and you'll have a puddle of peanut oil on
    top of rock hard peanut cement. Because the batch doesn't have all the
    great chemicals Jif and others have, the batches won't keep as long as you
    are accustomed and I can pretty well guarantee you won't like rancid peanut
    butter.

    The final food safety issue; where do you get your peanuts? Use dry roasted
    from a jar (which makes good peanut butter), but it has been processed in a
    plant and has many additives in the powdery substance used in processing
    them. Regardless of type or source, if there is any contaminant on the
    peanuts, you'll grind it right into the PB you're making and, leave traces
    of the contaminant in the machine to grow and contaminate future batches.

    Ultimately, I chose not to replace the Salton machine when marital discord
    send it to a new home with ex-wife. Instead, when I have a hankering for
    peanut butter, I stop by my local health food store and have them grind what
    I think I can use in a reasonable time; they can have the fun of cleaning a
    grinder. Still, I doubt I'm any better off from a food-safety standpoint;
    but, I do prefer PB without salt, sugar, added oil and other additives.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  10. #10
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2009 03:57:57 -0600, [email protected] wrote:

    >With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    >to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    >decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    >heard its cheaper too.
    >
    >Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    >Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    >think it's worth buying or not.


    It's called a food processor! It doesn't take any special equipment to
    make your own peanut butter - just grind them up and voila.

  11. #11
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    [email protected] wrote:
    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    >
    > Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > think it's worth buying or not.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > His Wife


    Although I have never tried it, I believe you could make
    pb successfully with either an blender or a food processor.

    Unless you use huge amounts of peanut butter every day, I can't imagine
    a dedicated machine being cost effective, but then I am on the frugal side.

    Remember that all contaminants don't arise from processing.
    Aflatoxins are present in whole peanuts also.

    Do you have an identity separate from "His"? Just curious.

    gloria p

  12. #12
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines


    "Arri London" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > Goomba wrote:
    >>
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >> > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    >> > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    >> > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    >> > heard its cheaper too.

    >>
    >> Which machines? A food processor...or perhaps a blender? I think you can
    >> make peanut butter with either.

    >
    > We make our peanut butter with the grinder attachment for the KA. Works
    > better than the food processor. The peanuts are dry-roasted in large
    > tins from the big box places; usually need to add a spoon of peanut oil
    > to get the right consistency. Takes abut 10 minutes or so to make a
    > batch.


    Interesting! Is it difficult to clean the attachment? How do you do that??

    TammyM



  13. #13
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines


    "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:H0Dkl.13543$[email protected]..
    >
    > On 11-Feb-2009, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    >> to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    >> decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    >> heard its cheaper too.
    >>
    >> Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    >> Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    >> think it's worth buying or not.

    >
    > Once upon a time, I owned a Salton Nut Butter Maker. The best reason to
    > own
    > one is not food safety (more on that in a moment); rather, it allows you
    > to
    > make peanut butter without added fat, sugar, emulsifiers and
    > preservatives.
    >


    This is true, but the problem is as I understand it from recent news
    broadcasts is that it's the whole unprocessed peanuts that are contaminated.
    I wouldn't rush out to buy peanuts.



  14. #14
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    [email protected] wrote:
    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    >
    > Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > think it's worth buying or not.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > His Wife



    You can make PB using either a food processor or a blender. You might
    have to add a little bit of oil to get them going; you can then remove
    some of the oil when it separates (don't remove all of it) if you get it
    too oily.

    Bob

  15. #15
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    l, not -l wrote:
    >
    > The downsides: The machine is hard to clean and you will likely have old
    > bits of nut-goo sticking around somewhere inside, just waiting to
    > contaminate your next batch - be prepared to spend far more time cleaning
    > the machine than in grinding peanuts. Because it is a PITA to clean, you'll
    > be tempted to grind larger batches each time. Sadly, if you don't use the
    > nut butter quickly, it separates and you'll have a puddle of peanut oil on
    > top of rock hard peanut cement. Because the batch doesn't have all the
    > great chemicals Jif and others have, the batches won't keep as long as you
    > are accustomed and I can pretty well guarantee you won't like rancid peanut
    > butter.


    As long as you don't add soybean oil (or any other polyunsaturated
    oils), peanut oil takes a long time to go rancid. Very long time. Years.

    > The final food safety issue; where do you get your peanuts? Use dry roasted
    > from a jar (which makes good peanut butter), but it has been processed in a
    > plant and has many additives in the powdery substance used in processing
    > them. Regardless of type or source, if there is any contaminant on the
    > peanuts, you'll grind it right into the PB you're making and, leave traces
    > of the contaminant in the machine to grow and contaminate future batches.


    Isn't salmonella killed by cooking? Obviously you don't want rat
    droppings in your peanut butter, but if they are contaminated, just
    *roast* them. If you have jars of questionable peanut butter in your
    pantry, *cook* something with them. Peanut soup, PB cookies, etc.

    Bob

  16. #16
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > heard its cheaper too.
    >
    > Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > think it's worth buying or not.


    Back in the 1970s, my mom was given a little peanut butter
    machine made by Salton. The peanut butter was good, but
    the machine was incredibly slow. It took maybe 5 minutes
    to make a tablespoon. On the other hand, if it had had
    a larger capacity, it would have more waste at the end
    of the batch (partially ground peanuts). It was very easy
    to clean. I haven't a clue whether this style is still
    being made.

    I have Champion juicer, which can be used to make nut
    butters. I have to say that the nut butters it makes
    are a bit grainy. Champion juicers have been around
    for decades and are still being made. They're pretty
    expensive, but they're available all the time on eBay.

  17. #17
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    l, not -l wrote:
    > On 11-Feb-2009, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    >> to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    >> decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    >> heard its cheaper too.
    >>
    >> Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    >> Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    >> think it's worth buying or not.

    >
    > Once upon a time, I owned a Salton Nut Butter Maker. The best reason
    > to own one is not food safety (more on that in a moment); rather, it
    > allows you to make peanut butter without added fat, sugar,
    > emulsifiers and preservatives.


    I suggest buying a jar of Teddie. It comes salted or unsalted, and has no
    ingredients other than peanuts [and salt if you like it, which I do]. In my
    experience, the separation factor is minimal. Possibly because it sells and
    doesn't sit on the shelf, it is easily stirred up with a knife. Not like
    those peanut butters that turn into a hardened block of powder topped by a
    big mess of oil.

    I've tried other "natural" peanut butters, but Teddie seems to taste the
    best.



  18. #18
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines



    TammyM wrote:
    >
    > "Arri London" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > >
    > > Goomba wrote:
    > >>
    > >> [email protected] wrote:
    > >> > With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > >> > to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > >> > decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > >> > heard its cheaper too.
    > >>
    > >> Which machines? A food processor...or perhaps a blender? I think you can
    > >> make peanut butter with either.

    > >
    > > We make our peanut butter with the grinder attachment for the KA. Works
    > > better than the food processor. The peanuts are dry-roasted in large
    > > tins from the big box places; usually need to add a spoon of peanut oil
    > > to get the right consistency. Takes abut 10 minutes or so to make a
    > > batch.

    >
    > Interesting! Is it difficult to clean the attachment? How do you do that??
    >
    > TammyM


    After the main batch has been processed, we run some bread through it.
    That picks up much of the remaining paste and gets eaten as a 'reward'.
    Then it all unscrews and gets washed with hot water and detergent. A
    dish brush gets in everywhere. No worse than cleaning it after grinding
    meat.

    We use the large-hole plate cos we like crunchy PB. Not certain how
    smooth it could get with the smaller-hole plate. Might need to run it
    through twice or finish in the food processor.

  19. #19
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines



    brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:H0Dkl.13543$[email protected]..
    > >
    > > On 11-Feb-2009, [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> With all the contaminated peanut butter going around, I am not going
    > >> to buy commercial peanut butter anymore. But I really like it, so I
    > >> decided I am going to buy one of those machines to make your own. I
    > >> heard its cheaper too.
    > >>
    > >> Has anyone bought one of them, and are any of them worth the money?
    > >> Please note the brand and model, the approx price, and whether you
    > >> think it's worth buying or not.

    > >
    > > Once upon a time, I owned a Salton Nut Butter Maker. The best reason to
    > > own
    > > one is not food safety (more on that in a moment); rather, it allows you
    > > to
    > > make peanut butter without added fat, sugar, emulsifiers and
    > > preservatives.
    > >

    >
    > This is true, but the problem is as I understand it from recent news
    > broadcasts is that it's the whole unprocessed peanuts that are contaminated.
    > I wouldn't rush out to buy peanuts.


    The peanuts/products would have to have been contaminated *after*
    roasting. Salmonella is easily killed by heat, as in roasting
    temperatures. Aflatoxins, IIRC, are not destroyed by ordinary cooking
    temps but can't comment on whether roasting would do them in.

  20. #20
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Homemade peanut butter machines

    Arri London wrote:

    > The peanuts/products would have to have been contaminated *after*
    > roasting. Salmonella is easily killed by heat, as in roasting
    > temperatures. Aflatoxins, IIRC, are not destroyed by ordinary cooking
    > temps but can't comment on whether roasting would do them in.


    I just read this while eating some roasted peanuts given to me by my
    friend. He has a thing about germs - always washing his hands and
    sanitizing stuff. This made me realize why he would show up at my office
    with a large baggie of roasted peanuts.

    Good thing I'm resistant to most germs - although I'm glad that roasting
    will kill salmonella. :-) This brings up yet another excellent
    opportunity to hassle my friend about his germ-fearing ways. I enjoy
    doing this. A lot. :-)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32