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Thread: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

  1. #1
    jmcquown Guest

    Default History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not always
    the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita consumption of
    margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of butter). Times have
    changed for the better, though. Today, per capita consumption of margarine
    in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including vegetable oil spreads) whereas butter
    consumption is down to about 4.2 pounds. Research studies have shown that
    the shift within populations around the world - from the highly saturated
    fat content of butter to vegetable oil-based margarines - have contributed
    significantly to the reduced risk of heart disease. Check out the timeline
    below to learn more about the history of margarine."

    http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html

    Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs butter
    (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted butter, so I
    have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is talking about.

    Jill


  2. #2
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    jmcquown wrote:
    > "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not
    > always the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita
    > consumption of margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of
    > butter). Times have changed for the better, though. Today, per capita
    > consumption of margarine in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including vegetable
    > oil spreads) whereas butter consumption is down to about 4.2 pounds.
    > Research studies have shown that the shift within populations around the
    > world - from the highly saturated fat content of butter to vegetable
    > oil-based margarines - have contributed significantly to the reduced
    > risk of heart disease. Check out the timeline below to learn more about
    > the history of margarine."
    >
    > http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html
    >
    > Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs
    > butter (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted
    > butter, so I have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is
    > talking about.


    I have to admit that the margarine I can buy these days is better than
    the margarine that my mother tried to foist on our family when I was a
    kid. They made it more palatable by making it taste more like butter. I
    can handle small amounts of it, but in most cases I would rather have
    nothing on bread and vegetables than to use margarine. I do keep a tub
    of it on hand for Buffalo wings because I think it is better with Franks
    sauce than (salted) butter. I also use it to grease cookie sheets. A tub
    of margarine lasts us more than a year, so our per capita consumption is
    less than one pound per year. I suppose there are lots of people who doe
    use it because there always seems to be more margarine for sale in the
    grocery store than butter, though there are fewer brands of butter
    available than margarine and I have no idea how often they re-stock the
    butter.




  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > I have to admit that the margarine I can buy these days is better than
    > the margarine that my mother tried to foist on our family when I was a
    > kid. They made it more palatable by making it taste more like butter.


    It could be that you're confusing the two main types
    of margarine. The cheapest type is made from animal
    fat, chiefly beef fat. That may have been what your
    mother was buying. None of the familiar advertised
    brands are made that way.

    Good margarine is made from vegetable oils, with
    flavor additives. The cheap stuff has flavor
    additives too, but they seem to do a better job
    with them in the more expensive margarines.

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    jmcquown wrote:
    > "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not
    > always the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita
    > consumption of margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of
    > butter). Times have changed for the better, though. Today, per capita
    > consumption of margarine in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including vegetable
    > oil spreads) whereas butter consumption is down to about 4.2 pounds.
    > Research studies have shown that the shift within populations around the
    > world - from the highly saturated fat content of butter to vegetable
    > oil-based margarines - have contributed significantly to the reduced
    > risk of heart disease. Check out the timeline below to learn more about
    > the history of margarine."
    >
    > http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html
    >
    > Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs
    > butter (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted
    > butter, so I have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is
    > talking about.
    >
    > Jill


    Uh, IMO, with few exceptions, a switch toward margarine is NOT an
    improvement. Of course, a site called margarine.org might just be
    a wee bit biased.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    Jean B. wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not
    >> always the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita
    >> consumption of margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of
    >> butter). Times have changed for the better, though. Today, per capita
    >> consumption of margarine in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including
    >> vegetable oil spreads) whereas butter consumption is down to about
    >> 4.2 pounds. Research studies have shown that the shift within
    >> populations around the world - from the highly saturated fat content
    >> of butter to vegetable oil-based margarines - have contributed
    >> significantly to the reduced risk of heart disease. Check out the
    >> timeline below to learn more about the history of margarine."
    >>
    >> http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html
    >>
    >> Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs
    >> butter (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted
    >> butter, so I have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is
    >> talking about.
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > Uh, IMO, with few exceptions, a switch toward margarine is NOT an
    > improvement. Of course, a site called margarine.org might just be
    > a wee bit biased.


    I certainly prefer butter over margarine. We were never served butter
    except on holidays. That was the only time mother ever served dinner rolls,
    too, and she always forgot to set the timer so the rolls always burned. She
    was never a huge fan of cooking. It's a standing joke in our family, "don't
    forget the rolls!"

    Speaking of rolls, here's a very nice dinner rolls recipe from the 1978
    edition of the Good Housekeeping Cookbook. You can make the dough well
    ahead of time and pop them into a pan to bake at the last minute.

    Refrigerator Rolls

    6 to 6-1/2 c. all purpose flour
    1/2 c. sugar
    2 tsp. salt
    2 pkgs. active dry yeast
    1/2 c. butter, softenend
    2 c. hot water
    1 egg
    salad oil

    Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:
    1. In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt & yeast. Add butter.
    With a hand-mixer at low speed, gradually beat in 2 c. hot water (120
    degrees). Add egg and increase speed to medium. Beat 2 minutes,
    occasionally scraping the bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir in enough
    additional flour (about 2-1/2 cups) to make a soft dough.

    2. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and
    elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a large ball and place in a large
    greased bowl, turning dough so all is greased. Cover with a towel and let
    rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.

    3. Punch down dough and push edges of dough to the center. Turn dough over
    and brush with salad oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and
    refrigerate, punching dough down occasionally, until ready to use.

    Up to 2 hours before serving:

    4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan. Cut
    the dough into 30 equal pieces; shape into balls and place in pan. Cover
    with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled (again about 1-1/2
    hours).

    5. Preheat oven to 425F degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    brown.
    Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully remove from pan
    and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.

    Jill


  6. #6
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    I think it's pretty well established that oleo/margarine/spreads
    are worse for your health than butter, which is worse for your
    health than (most) unprocessed vegetable oils.

    A recent datapoint on the first of these is that C-reactive protein is
    73% higher than average in the upper quartile of trans-fat
    consumption. Could just be a coincidence, but it doesn't sound good.

    Steve

  7. #7
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > I have to admit that the margarine I can buy these days is better than
    > the margarine that my mother tried to foist on our family when I was a
    > kid. They made it more palatable by making it taste more like butter.
    > I can handle small amounts of it, but in most cases I would rather
    > have nothing on bread and vegetables than to use margarine. I do keep
    > a tub of it on hand for Buffalo wings because I think it is better
    > with Franks sauce than (salted) butter. I also use it to grease
    > cookie sheets. A tub of margarine lasts us more than a year, so our
    > per capita consumption is less than one pound per year.


    Thanks for the idea of greasing to use up margarine! I was going to make
    banana bread today (it'll have to wait until tomorrow, though) and that's a
    *perfect* way to use it. I'll just have to do a lot of baking to use the
    two tubs up my brother bought. :~)

    kili



  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter


    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not always
    > the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita consumption of
    > margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of butter). Times have
    > changed for the better, though. Today, per capita consumption of margarine
    > in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including vegetable oil spreads) whereas butter
    > consumption is down to about 4.2 pounds. Research studies have shown that
    > the shift within populations around the world - from the highly saturated
    > fat content of butter to vegetable oil-based margarines - have contributed
    > significantly to the reduced risk of heart disease. Check out the timeline
    > below to learn more about the history of margarine."
    >
    > http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html
    >
    > Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs
    > butter (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted
    > butter, so I have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is
    > talking about.
    >
    > Jill



    There's a little more to the butter/margarine wars than the simple outline.
    The main obstacle was the colored Margarine tax that made butter colored
    margarine prohibitive.

    I remember a margarine mixer we had designed to spread the color packet and
    make the margarine look like butter.

    See below:

    Dimitri

    http://www.fee.org/publications/the-...e.asp?aid=4188

    In the following decades the federal government kept up its attack on
    margarine-and by extension, on poor consumers-by twice amending the 1886 Act
    to tighten the screws on the industry. An amendment in 1902 targeted the
    production of artificially yellowed margarine. The amendment imposed a
    ten-cent tax on (butter-colored) margarine and slashed the tax on the
    uncolored variety. In response, producers began experimenting with various
    vegetable oils that would give their product the desirable yellow color but
    would escape the new tax.

    By World War I, all-vegetable-oil margarines (made from peanut, corn seed,
    hazelnut, and other oils) dominated the margarine market. The industry's
    latest act of ingenuity was met in 1931 by a new amendment to the 1886 Act,
    which closed the loophole for naturally yellow margarine by taxing all
    yellow margarines. Production was stopped.

    But the besieged margarine industry picked itself up and struck back. There
    was no law against adding yellow coloring to margarine at home. So the
    manufacturers provided yellow coloring packets with their margarine. With
    uncolored margarine safely under the tax radar, market share began to climb
    again, as Depression-era consumers warmed to margarine's value right through
    World War II-all the while wondering "why don't they just make the margarine
    yellow at the factory?"

    By the late '40s producers had begun to process domestic oils-corn seed,
    soybean, and others-into margarine, winning the support of farmers groups
    and labor unions for the repeal of the state and federal regulations on
    margarine production and consumption.

    Years of lobbying would be needed to dislodge these interventions, including
    marches and demonstrations by housewives carrying placards with slogans
    like, "We Want Yellow Margarine Tax Free!," and signature-collection drives
    on cards reading: "Dear Mr. Congressman, Who comes first . . . the consumer
    or the butter lobby? Please remove the unfair restrictions on margarine."

    Finally, in 1949 and 1950 Congress narrowly voted to repeal the tax on
    colored margarine and President Truman signed the new Margarine Act into
    law. By 1955 every state but Minnesota and Wisconsin had repealed its
    anti-margarine color laws, with Minnesota holding out until 1963 and
    Wisconsin-"the Dairy State"-not relenting until 1967.

    And so ended the dairy industry's 80-year war on margarine and America's
    consumers, especially the poorest among them.


  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > There's a little more to the butter/margarine wars than the simple outline.
    > The main obstacle was the colored Margarine tax that made butter colored
    > margarine prohibitive.
    >
    > I remember a margarine mixer we had designed to spread the color packet and
    > make the margarine look like butter.


    My sister remembers mixing the color into the margarine,
    but I don't. I was too little, or maybe not even born yet.

    There's other food events which mark our lives. For example,
    in high school I mentioned to a friend of mine that root beer
    used to contain safrole, but it was banned because it is
    weakly carcinogenic. "Oh, that's what happened! I remember
    root beer used to taste really good, and then it changed."
    I didn't recall when the taste of root beer changed, but
    he remembered it clearly and had wondered what happened.

    What other food events define our lives? I don't think
    the disappearance of Mother's cookies quite rises to the
    same level as coloring margarine or the day root beer died.
    What else does? I suppose the disappearance of Liederkranz,
    if you were a big fan of that cheese.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liederkranz_cheese

    I can't remember ever having eaten that cheese. I've eaten
    plenty of limburger, and quite like that cheese.

    And if I recall correctly, genuine Italian prosciutto wasn't
    imported into the U.S. until the 1970s or 1980s, when the
    strict U.S. import laws were relaxed.

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: History of Oleo (margarine) vs Butter

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Jean B. wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>> "Although it has been around for over a century, margarine was not
    >>> always the preferred tablespread in the U.S. In 1930, per capita
    >>> consumption of margarine was only 2.6 pounds (vs. 17.6 pounds of
    >>> butter). Times have changed for the better, though. Today, per capita
    >>> consumption of margarine in the U.S. is 8.3 pounds (including
    >>> vegetable oil spreads) whereas butter consumption is down to about
    >>> 4.2 pounds. Research studies have shown that the shift within
    >>> populations around the world - from the highly saturated fat content
    >>> of butter to vegetable oil-based margarines - have contributed
    >>> significantly to the reduced risk of heart disease. Check out the
    >>> timeline below to learn more about the history of margarine."
    >>>
    >>> http://www.margarine.org/historyofmargarine.html
    >>>
    >>> Note, I didn't simply provide a link and I'm not selling margarine vs
    >>> butter (or calendars). Butter is better And you can buy unsalted
    >>> butter, so I have no clue what that poster questioning saltiness is
    >>> talking about.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> Uh, IMO, with few exceptions, a switch toward margarine is NOT an
    >> improvement. Of course, a site called margarine.org might just be
    >> a wee bit biased.

    >
    > I certainly prefer butter over margarine. We were never served butter
    > except on holidays. That was the only time mother ever served dinner
    > rolls, too, and she always forgot to set the timer so the rolls always
    > burned. She was never a huge fan of cooking. It's a standing joke in
    > our family, "don't forget the rolls!"
    >
    > Speaking of rolls, here's a very nice dinner rolls recipe from the 1978
    > edition of the Good Housekeeping Cookbook. You can make the dough well
    > ahead of time and pop them into a pan to bake at the last minute.
    >
    > Refrigerator Rolls
    >
    > 6 to 6-1/2 c. all purpose flour
    > 1/2 c. sugar
    > 2 tsp. salt
    > 2 pkgs. active dry yeast
    > 1/2 c. butter, softenend
    > 2 c. hot water
    > 1 egg
    > salad oil
    >
    > Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:
    > 1. In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt & yeast. Add
    > butter.
    > With a hand-mixer at low speed, gradually beat in 2 c. hot water (120
    > degrees). Add egg and increase speed to medium. Beat 2 minutes,
    > occasionally scraping the bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir in enough
    > additional flour (about 2-1/2 cups) to make a soft dough.
    >
    > 2. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and
    > elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a large ball and place in a large
    > greased bowl, turning dough so all is greased. Cover with a towel and let
    > rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.
    >
    > 3. Punch down dough and push edges of dough to the center. Turn dough over
    > and brush with salad oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and
    > refrigerate, punching dough down occasionally, until ready to use.
    >
    > Up to 2 hours before serving:
    >
    > 4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan. Cut
    > the dough into 30 equal pieces; shape into balls and place in pan. Cover
    > with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled (again about 1-1/2
    > hours).
    >
    > 5. Preheat oven to 425F degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    > brown.
    > Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully remove from
    > pan
    > and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.
    >
    > Jill


    My mom (unfortunately) used margarine. Therefore, for better or
    for worse, I didn't discover the joys of bread (and rolls, etc.)
    and butter until I was 20 or so. I remember even in the early 80s
    reading that margarine was not good for people.

    --
    Jean B.

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