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Thread: Herb gardens

  1. #1
    Steve B Guest

    Default Herb gardens

    Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    YOU grow and why?

    Steve



  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Mar 21, 8:55*am, "Steve B" <deserttra...@dishymail.net> wrote:
    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. *Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >
    > Steve


    I do pots on my deck every year. Rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage,
    chives, parsley, lavender, savory, and of course basil when it's warm
    enough.

    I just put in the herbs I use most. Then I dry some if there is a
    huge amount and I'm not keeping up with using them fresh. I find
    drying them myself, I have much fresher tasting herbs in the winter.

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 08:55:41 -0700, "Steve B"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >

    I don't have enough heat for basil, but if the growing conditions were
    right I'd grow it (and cilantro) because I use them in fresh form a
    lot. I do grow parsley, rosemary and sage which are used quite often.
    I've tried to grow garlic, but it hasn't worked out for me so I just
    buy it from the grocer, same with ginger. I have thyme, oregano and
    marjoram growing, but it's easier to use dried - so they are more
    decorative than useful for me.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  4. #4
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    sf replied to Steve B:

    >> Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    >> YOU grow and why?
    >>

    > I don't have enough heat for basil, but if the growing conditions were
    > right I'd grow it (and cilantro) because I use them in fresh form a
    > lot. I do grow parsley, rosemary and sage which are used quite often.
    > I've tried to grow garlic, but it hasn't worked out for me so I just
    > buy it from the grocer, same with ginger. I have thyme, oregano and
    > marjoram growing, but it's easier to use dried - so they are more
    > decorative than useful for me.


    I kill silk plants, so I'm amazed that a large planter of thyme and
    another of chives are growing without my intervention for two years now.
    I've got a rosemary plant that I should probably get in the ground -- we
    trim from it so much that it's hard to tell if it's grown. We have a
    planter of mint that's trying to make its way back, and we've started
    purple sage and chocolate mint. So far, those are still alive. I'll
    eventually have to get a raised box area for our rhubarb. I've got it in
    three separate large containers and it's growing rapidly.

    --Lin

  5. #5
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Steve B wrote:
    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >
    > Steve


    Cilantro, because buying it is so expensive and I rarely need the entire
    head before the leftover goes bad.
    Italian Parsley, because parsley is so important to cooking!
    Basil, because fresh basil is delicious and so much cheaper when you
    grow it yourself.

  6. #6
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Mar 21, 11:55*am, "Steve B" <deserttra...@dishymail.net> wrote:
    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. *Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >
    > Steve


    I have thyme, mint and chives and green onion thingies (I inherited
    with the yard, didn't plant myself) that are perennials. I always
    plant basil once it warms up.

    I'd really like to do an Italian parsley and something else this year,
    too. Maybe this thread will inspire me. Thanks for starting it.

    Kris

  7. #7
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Steve B wrote:
    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >




    Basil, basil, basil
    Oregano
    Rosemary
    Summer savory
    Tarragon
    Parsley, Italian
    Cilantro
    Mint (for tea)

    Why? Because I like them for cooking.

    gloria p

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Spring is here, and I want to make a raised herb garden. Which herbs would
    > YOU grow and why?
    >
    > Steve


    Whatever you would normally use in your cooking, and whatever would grow
    well in your zone.

    Me?

    Basil (because I like it a lot)
    Rosemary (because I like it and it grows well)
    Thyme (same as above)
    Mexican Oregano (ditto)
    Dittany (a preferred substitute for regular oregano)
    Mexican Marigold (a substitute for tarragon which I can't seem to keep
    alive)
    Lemon balm (it works in a lot of recipes that require lemony herbs and
    does really well)
    Catnip (need you ask? <g> The kitty's adore it)
    Sage (to be used in limited quantities and it grows well here)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck." --Dalai Lama

  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    In article <a9c1$4ba65003$453e8ce6$[email protected]>,
    Lin <g[email protected]> wrote:

    > I kill silk plants, so I'm amazed that a large planter of thyme and
    > another of chives are growing without my intervention for two years now.
    > I've got a rosemary plant that I should probably get in the ground -- we
    > trim from it so much that it's hard to tell if it's grown. We have a
    > planter of mint that's trying to make its way back, and we've started
    > purple sage and chocolate mint. So far, those are still alive. I'll
    > eventually have to get a raised box area for our rhubarb. I've got it in
    > three separate large containers and it's growing rapidly.
    >
    > --Lin


    I have a patch of garlic chives that is a good 20 years old. They freeze
    back every winter but spread from seeds, and many of the previous years
    bulbs survive in pots and in the ground. I sent some seeds to sf and I
    hope they do as well for her. :-) They have thrived on benign neglect...
    I just throw some water at them if they look like they are dieing.

    Bloom: http://tinyurl.com/ykh7b2h
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck." --Dalai Lama

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 09:57:38 -0700, Lin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I kill silk plants,


    LOL! Now that's a real brown thumb.

    >so I'm amazed that a large planter of thyme and
    > another of chives are growing without my intervention for two years now.
    > I've got a rosemary plant that I should probably get in the ground -- we
    > trim from it so much that it's hard to tell if it's grown. We have a
    > planter of mint that's trying to make its way back, and we've started
    > purple sage and chocolate mint. So far, those are still alive.


    Try to find a place in the shade where your mint will have "damp
    feet"... under a leaky faucet or near a well with a shade cloth over
    it is ideal.

    > I'll
    > eventually have to get a raised box area for our rhubarb. I've got it in
    > three separate large containers and it's growing rapidly.


    I love rhubarb! Do you have any artichokes? They probably like my
    cold and fog better than your heat... what about a Meyer lemon tree?

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  11. #11
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Omelet wrote:

    > I just throw some water at them if they look like they are dieing.
    >
    > Bloom: http://tinyurl.com/ykh7b2h


    Wow! I need some of your magic water! Mine look nothing like that!

    --Lin

  12. #12
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    sf wrote:

    > LOL! Now that's a real brown thumb.


    More like black thumb!

    > I love rhubarb! Do you have any artichokes? They probably like my
    > cold and fog better than your heat... what about a Meyer lemon tree?


    No artichokes (other than what we buy from the store or farmers market).
    We do like going to Castroville for the Artichoke Festival. Nice drive
    and some great food there.

    Artichokes are one of those things that I think I *REALLY* want, but
    after trimming the sharp points, cooking and then getting a fiddlin' bit
    of stuff out of them, I always wonder "why bother?" Castroville is nice
    because they've done all the work for us, and if we want to get really
    fresh artichokes, they are all over the place for purchase on our way
    out of town.

    Haven't planted the Meyer lemon yet -- and not sure if we will since
    they are pretty abundant around here and somehow we manage to get
    freebies from some of Bob's coworkers.

    --Lin (should be outside enjoying this fine day)



  13. #13
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On 3/21/2010 2:36 PM, Lin wrote:
    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    >> I just throw some water at them if they look like they are dieing.
    >>
    >> Bloom: http://tinyurl.com/ykh7b2h

    >
    > Wow! I need some of your magic water! Mine look nothing like that!
    >
    > --Lin


    I've had garlic chives for about fifteen years and they've only bloomed
    once. We get enough rain that I haven't had to toss water on them. May
    try that just to see them bloom. Mine spread by "bunching" or by the
    roots. I have to dig a bunch up and toss them to keep them from taking
    over the herb garden.

  14. #14
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Pinstripe Sniper wrote:

    > I usually plant:
    >
    > basil (top priority!)


    Basil is so prevalent here (and inexpensive) that I haven't really
    bothered with planting it. I do like getting big, fresh bunches of it
    and keep it in a little glass of water on the counter. I love the way
    fresh basil smells. I have tried planting when some of them put off
    roots in the water, but I wasn't successful in my attempts.

    > jalapeno
    > habanero


    Tried doing some habaneros and anaheim type chiles, but I wasn't very
    successful with those either. :-(

    >> We have a
    >> planter of mint that's trying to make its way back, and we've started
    >> purple sage and chocolate mint. So far, those are still alive.

    >
    > So you're a fibber about killing the silk plant? :-)


    Let's just say that the nursery gave the latter two a good start and I
    haven't futzed it up yet! It could happen ...

    --Lin

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 10:41:24 -0700 (PDT), Kris <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I'd really like to do an Italian parsley and something else this year,
    > too. Maybe this thread will inspire me. Thanks for starting it.


    Parsley is a biennial; so plant it this year, again next year and you
    should always have it growing.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  16. #16
    Pinstripe Sniper Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I kill silk plants


    I bow down to your power! :-) I've killed mint! :-) (actually my
    mint patch got covered by a shade tree)

    > so I'm amazed that a large planter of thyme and
    >another of chives are growing without my intervention for two years now.
    >I've got a rosemary plant that I should probably get in the ground -- we
    >trim from it so much that it's hard to tell if it's grown.


    I'm not that big on Rosemary so wouldn't you know my one rosemary
    plant is gigantic. (all in ground)

    I usually plant:

    basil (top priority!)
    jalapeno
    habanero

    Self renewing patches
    garlic (garlic "greens" are now my fave "green onion")
    clover (salad greens)
    asparagus

    I'll also do
    melons
    soy (edamame)

    >We have a
    >planter of mint that's trying to make its way back, and we've started
    >purple sage and chocolate mint. So far, those are still alive.


    So you're a fibber about killing the silk plant? :-)
    I'm going to plant some mint...right now! When I had live mint, I'd
    pluck and chew a few mint leaves as a hippie breath freshener.

    >I'll
    >eventually have to get a raised box area for our rhubarb. I've got it in
    >three separate large containers and it's growing rapidly.
    >--Lin



    PsS

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    More at http://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com and if that gets banned, check
    www.PinstripeSniper.com

  17. #17
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Mar 21, 4:03*pm, veryso...@nocando.com (Pinstripe Sniper) wrote:
    > Lin <grafixREMOVETHISbunny2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >Basil is so prevalent here (and inexpensive) that I haven't really
    > >bothered with planting it. I do like getting big, fresh bunches of it
    > >and keep it in a little glass of water on the counter. I love the way
    > >fresh basil smells. I have tried planting when some of them put off
    > >roots in the water, but I wasn't successful in my attempts.
    > >Let's just say that the nursery gave the latter two a good start and I
    > >haven't futzed it up yet! It could happen ...
    > >--Lin

    >
    > May I make a wild guess and speculate that you may be overwatering
    > your plants? *A few general suggestions?
    >
    > 1. *If the plants are in liftable pots, use the weight of the pot as
    > an indication of how wet/dry the soil is in that pot.
    >
    > 2. Measure the water you are putting on each plant and keep notes on
    > quantity and watering intervals - pot weight even.
    > Maybe try several different combos of watering schedules on the same
    > type of plant.
    >
    > 3. Consider sitting the pots in a tub of water for several minutes as
    > a way of evenly watering all the soil in the pot. *This practice may
    > cause heated debates . *:-) * (Nutrient flushing)
    >
    > 4. *Go easy on the fertilizer - omit even when you are starting out.
    >
    > PsS
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------
    > A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    > More athttp://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com*and if that gets banned, checkwww.PinstripeSniper.com


    If you need to check whether or not your potted herbs need water, or
    your houseplants for that matter, you need one of these babies. You
    can find them at any garden center or on line. I use mine all the
    time, especially for plants
    I don't want to overwater.

    http://www.amazon.com/Indoor-Outdoor...9209333&sr=8-1

  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 14:47:05 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 10:41:24 -0700 (PDT), Kris <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> I'd really like to do an Italian parsley and something else this year,
    >> too. Maybe this thread will inspire me. Thanks for starting it.

    >
    >Parsley is a biennial; so plant it this year, again next year and you
    >should always have it growing.


    Nope, biennial means the plant grows a second season and dies...
    parsley really doesn't taste very good the second season because
    that's when it tries to produce seed... plant new each year. Parsley
    is the only herb I grow, it's the only herb I use nearly every day...
    I even use it as a salad green... the other herbs I would use
    occasionally are readily available at produce stands or I'd use dried.
    I much prefer curly parsley, I think it has a sweeter flavor, and it
    just looks more appealing as a garnish. Didya know that parsley
    contains the most Vitamin C, more than citrus.

    M-W
    bi·en·ni·al
    adjective
    1 : occurring every two years
    2 : continuing or lasting for two years; specifically : growing
    vegetatively during the first year and fruiting and dying during the
    second



  19. #19
    Pinstripe Sniper Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Basil is so prevalent here (and inexpensive) that I haven't really
    >bothered with planting it. I do like getting big, fresh bunches of it
    >and keep it in a little glass of water on the counter. I love the way
    >fresh basil smells. I have tried planting when some of them put off
    >roots in the water, but I wasn't successful in my attempts.


    >Let's just say that the nursery gave the latter two a good start and I
    >haven't futzed it up yet! It could happen ...
    >--Lin


    May I make a wild guess and speculate that you may be overwatering
    your plants? A few general suggestions?

    1. If the plants are in liftable pots, use the weight of the pot as
    an indication of how wet/dry the soil is in that pot.

    2. Measure the water you are putting on each plant and keep notes on
    quantity and watering intervals - pot weight even.
    Maybe try several different combos of watering schedules on the same
    type of plant.

    3. Consider sitting the pots in a tub of water for several minutes as
    a way of evenly watering all the soil in the pot. This practice may
    cause heated debates . :-) (Nutrient flushing)

    4. Go easy on the fertilizer - omit even when you are starting out.


    PsS

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    More at http://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com and if that gets banned, check
    www.PinstripeSniper.com

  20. #20
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Herb gardens

    On Mar 21, 3:58*pm, brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 14:47:05 -0700, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > >On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 10:41:24 -0700 (PDT), Kris <shanno...@hotmail.com>
    > >wrote:

    >
    > >> I'd really like to do an Italian parsley and something else this year,
    > >> too. Maybe this thread will inspire me. Thanks for starting it.

    >
    > >Parsley is a biennial; so plant it this year, again next year and you
    > >should always have it growing.

    >
    > Nope, biennial means the plant grows a second season and dies...
    > parsley really doesn't taste very good the second season because
    > that's when it tries to produce seed... plant new each year. *Parsley
    > is the only herb I grow, it's the only herb I use nearly every day...
    > I even use it as a salad green... the other herbs I would use
    > occasionally are readily available at produce stands or I'd use dried.
    > I much prefer curly parsley, I think it has a sweeter flavor, and it
    > just looks more appealing as a garnish. *Didya know that parsley
    > contains the most Vitamin C, more than citrus.
    >
    > M-W
    > bi en ni al
    > adjective
    > 1 : occurring every two years
    > 2 : continuing or lasting for two years; specifically : growing
    > vegetatively during the first year and fruiting and dying during the
    > second


    I think you missed that point. If you plant parsley one year and
    then AGAIN the next, yes it will die the second year after it goes to
    seed...but it will reseed itself. Therefore if you plant two years
    in a row you always have one set of plants reseeding itself...
    therefore you always have parsley. We did that and it worked
    great. Parsley always came up every year and we always had 'new'
    parsley while the 'old' was reseeding.

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