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Thread: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

  1. #1
    Alan Calan Guest

    Default Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    went wrong:

    I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    more.

    The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.

    I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end
    under it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.

    I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    became a nightmare. I did the best I could and then put the cut
    linguini and a tent like shape. When I finished, everything stuck
    together. I guess keeping it straight would have been the best idea.

    I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma
    said she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the
    mountain of flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and
    incorporating the flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I
    wonder if I used too much water.

    Alan

  2. #2
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    Alan Calan wrote:
    >
    > I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    > went wrong:
    >
    > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    > more.
    >
    > The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    > minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    > the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    > should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    > linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    > much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    > videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.
    >
    > I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    > cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    > dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    > rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end
    > under it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.
    >
    > I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    > became a nightmare. I did the best I could and then put the cut
    > linguini and a tent like shape. When I finished, everything stuck
    > together. I guess keeping it straight would have been the best idea.
    >
    > I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma
    > said she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the
    > mountain of flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and
    > incorporating the flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I
    > wonder if I used too much water.
    >
    > Alan


    You almost certainly used too much water. Properly done, the dough will
    not really come together in a coherent form until you've run it through
    the rollers on #1 a number of times, folding it in half after each pass,
    effectively kneading it. After a while of this the raggedy dough will
    start to hold together better and become more uniform and a bit elastic.
    Once it's holding together you can let it rest for a bit before rolling
    it down to thickness and then running it through the cutters.

  3. #3
    boulanger Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    > went wrong:
    >
    > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    > more.
    >


    That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how to fill
    the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    The recipe I have is:
    300g flour
    3 eggs
    1 tsp salt




  4. #4
    Alan Calan Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    I remember watching Maryanne Esposito make pasta dough by hand and it
    never looked like my dough. Maybe the recipe doesn't work well in the
    mixer. It didn't taste that bad, the linguinis that I was abl to
    separate.

    What about the technique of when to do the rolling and cutting and
    what do you do with the pasta after each step?

    Alan


    On Wed, 04 Mar 2009 19:36:33 -0600, "Pete C." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >You almost certainly used too much water. Properly done, the dough will
    >not really come together in a coherent form until you've run it through
    >the rollers on #1 a number of times, folding it in half after each pass,
    >effectively kneading it. After a while of this the raggedy dough will
    >start to hold together better and become more uniform and a bit elastic.
    >Once it's holding together you can let it rest for a bit before rolling
    >it down to thickness and then running it through the cutters.


  5. #5
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    Alan Calan wrote:
    >
    > I remember watching Maryanne Esposito make pasta dough by hand and it
    > never looked like my dough. Maybe the recipe doesn't work well in the
    > mixer. It didn't taste that bad, the linguinis that I was abl to
    > separate.
    >
    > What about the technique of when to do the rolling and cutting and
    > what do you do with the pasta after each step?
    >
    > Alan


    Dust the pasta with flour before running through the cutter. Use a long
    handle woden/plastic spoon to catch the cut pasta when it's half way
    through, letting it drape over the handle of the spoon. Either
    immediately transfer it to a large pot of boiling water to cook, or hang
    it over a drying rack to dry a bit more.



    >
    > On Wed, 04 Mar 2009 19:36:33 -0600, "Pete C." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >You almost certainly used too much water. Properly done, the dough will
    > >not really come together in a coherent form until you've run it through
    > >the rollers on #1 a number of times, folding it in half after each pass,
    > >effectively kneading it. After a while of this the raggedy dough will
    > >start to hold together better and become more uniform and a bit elastic.
    > >Once it's holding together you can let it rest for a bit before rolling
    > >it down to thickness and then running it through the cutters.


  6. #6
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    boulanger wrote:
    >
    > "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    > > went wrong:
    > >
    > > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    > > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    > > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    > > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    > > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    > > more.
    > >

    >
    > That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how to fill
    > the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    > The recipe I have is:
    > 300g flour
    > 3 eggs
    > 1 tsp salt


    Most definitely! When baking/making stuff like bread & pasta - it's
    much better to go by weight!!! I'm learning this the hard way, too!

    Sky, who's yet to figure out a good baguette

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  7. #7
    boulanger Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > boulanger wrote:
    >>
    >> "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    >> > went wrong:
    >> >
    >> > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >> > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >> > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    >> > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    >> > more.
    >> >

    >>
    >> That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how to
    >> fill
    >> the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    >> The recipe I have is:
    >> 300g flour
    >> 3 eggs
    >> 1 tsp salt

    >
    > Most definitely! When baking/making stuff like bread & pasta - it's
    > much better to go by weight!!! I'm learning this the hard way, too!
    >
    > Sky, who's yet to figure out a good baguette
    >

    Have you tried Maggie Glazer's recipe? Apparently, it's very good but I've
    not tried it. The classic French dough is 60% hydration, i.e., 60g water to
    every 100g of flour but their flour is softer than Canadian and US bread
    flours that require more water.



  8. #8
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    boulanger wrote:
    >
    > "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > boulanger wrote:
    > >>
    > >> "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]..
    > >> >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > >> > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    > >> > went wrong:
    > >> >
    > >> > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    > >> > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    > >> > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    > >> > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    > >> > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    > >> > more.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how to
    > >> fill
    > >> the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    > >> The recipe I have is:
    > >> 300g flour
    > >> 3 eggs
    > >> 1 tsp salt

    > >
    > > Most definitely! When baking/making stuff like bread & pasta - it's
    > > much better to go by weight!!! I'm learning this the hard way, too!
    > >
    > > Sky, who's yet to figure out a good baguette
    > >

    > Have you tried Maggie Glazer's recipe? Apparently, it's very good but I've
    > not tried it. The classic French dough is 60% hydration, i.e., 60g water to
    > every 100g of flour but their flour is softer than Canadian and US bread
    > flours that require more water.


    !!!! Oh gosh, more "science" to learn So far, I've been able to
    make fairly good bread, and other times I get less than satisfactory
    results (sigh). No, I've not tried that particular recipe you've
    mentioned. Can you kindly provide a website or link to it? I'd greatly
    appreciate it. When making bread, I've learned measuring by weight
    provides better results than when measuring by volume.

    Sky, a baking newbie!

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    "Alan Calan" ha scritto nel messaggio
    >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what> went
    > wrong:


    Using a motorized pasta roller/cutter with no experience, that's all.
    >
    > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 easpoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    > It made very dry dough that would not come together.


    Yes, it certainly would. Unless making a regional specialty, I use 100 g of
    flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the difference among
    eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to keep it moving.

    >>So I started> adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a
    >>cup or> more.>

    > The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    > minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    > the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    > should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    > linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    > much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    > videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.
    >
    > I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    > cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    > dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    > rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end> under
    > it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.


    I didn't really understand all that. For what it's worth I teach to roll
    then cut, leaving a towel over the lumps of unused dough. Many don't fold
    and roll anywhere near enough. Do that on number 1 until the pasta sheet,
    which you have been dusting with flour, feels like damp skin.

    > I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    > became a nightmare.


    It dried because it was left too long. You can't possibly work fast enough
    the first (100) time to leave pasta sheets around. Nobody cam, it's not
    your fault.

    When I finished, everything stuck
    > together.


    When your cut pasta exits the cutter, drop it on some flour and gently
    swoosh with your fingers then arrange as you please. Alternatively, have a
    clothes drying rack ready and lay the pasta strings on flour then gently
    transfer onto the rack. They will at least be separate, although they also
    dry quickly.

    > I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma> said
    > she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the> mountain of
    > flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and> incorporating the
    > flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I> wonder if I used too much
    > water.


    I am sure you did. Don't add any at all and use her technique. You will
    quickly find that you can't add too much flour, it won't let you. The
    crumbly bits you begin with start to smooth out and become stretchy as the
    egg takes up the flour. It is simply one of the most sensuous kitchen
    chores there is. The more you feel your way through the work, the better
    the pasta. Then refrigerate 30 mins or so in pieces wrapped in plastic.



  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    Giusi said...

    > "Alan Calan" ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what>
    >> went wrong:

    >
    > Using a motorized pasta roller/cutter with no experience, that's all.
    >>
    >> I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >> 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 easpoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >> It made very dry dough that would not come together.

    >
    > Yes, it certainly would. Unless making a regional specialty, I use 100
    > g of flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the
    > difference among eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to
    > keep it moving.
    >
    >>>So I started> adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a
    >>>1/2 a cup or> more.>

    >> The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    >> minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    >> the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    >> should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    >> linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    >> much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    >> videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.
    >>
    >> I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    >> cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    >> dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    >> rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end>
    >> under it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.

    >
    > I didn't really understand all that. For what it's worth I teach to
    > roll then cut, leaving a towel over the lumps of unused dough. Many
    > don't fold and roll anywhere near enough. Do that on number 1 until the
    > pasta sheet, which you have been dusting with flour, feels like damp
    > skin.
    >
    >> I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    >> became a nightmare.

    >
    > It dried because it was left too long. You can't possibly work fast
    > enough the first (100) time to leave pasta sheets around. Nobody cam,
    > it's not your fault.
    >
    > When I finished, everything stuck
    >> together.

    >
    > When your cut pasta exits the cutter, drop it on some flour and gently
    > swoosh with your fingers then arrange as you please. Alternatively,
    > have a clothes drying rack ready and lay the pasta strings on flour then
    > gently transfer onto the rack. They will at least be separate, although
    > they also dry quickly.
    >
    >> I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma>
    >> said she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the>
    >> mountain of flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and>
    >> incorporating the flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I>
    >> wonder if I used too much water.

    >
    > I am sure you did. Don't add any at all and use her technique. You
    > will quickly find that you can't add too much flour, it won't let you.
    > The crumbly bits you begin with start to smooth out and become stretchy
    > as the egg takes up the flour. It is simply one of the most sensuous
    > kitchen chores there is. The more you feel your way through the work,
    > the better the pasta. Then refrigerate 30 mins or so in pieces wrapped
    > in plastic.



    Run a string across from one cabinet knob to another. Buy a set of plastic
    coat hangers, clean thoroughly.

    Make golfball size dough clumps. Work from 1 to 5 roller settings and then
    hang on a hanger. Repeat for all the dough. Then switch to a pasta cutter
    and feed each pasta sheet through and re-hang cut pasta. Repeat until done.

    Take a hanger of pasta and trim with scissors over the pot of boiling
    water.

    Suggestion: I add 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric to the dough while mixing to
    golden it up a bit. More visually appealing, imho.

    Homemade pasta is the most fun mess I can make in the kitchen! ))

    Andy

  11. #11
    boulanger Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > boulanger wrote:
    >>
    >> "Sky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> > boulanger wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >> >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> >> > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    >> >> > went wrong:
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> >> > roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5
    >> >> > or
    >> >> > 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of
    >> >> > water.
    >> >> > It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    >> >> > adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    >> >> > more.
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how
    >> >> to
    >> >> fill
    >> >> the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    >> >> The recipe I have is:
    >> >> 300g flour
    >> >> 3 eggs
    >> >> 1 tsp salt
    >> >
    >> > Most definitely! When baking/making stuff like bread & pasta - it's
    >> > much better to go by weight!!! I'm learning this the hard way, too!
    >> >
    >> > Sky, who's yet to figure out a good baguette
    >> >

    >> Have you tried Maggie Glazer's recipe? Apparently, it's very good but
    >> I've
    >> not tried it. The classic French dough is 60% hydration, i.e., 60g water
    >> to
    >> every 100g of flour but their flour is softer than Canadian and US bread
    >> flours that require more water.

    >
    > !!!! Oh gosh, more "science" to learn So far, I've been able to
    > make fairly good bread, and other times I get less than satisfactory
    > results (sigh). No, I've not tried that particular recipe you've
    > mentioned. Can you kindly provide a website or link to it? I'd greatly
    > appreciate it. When making bread, I've learned measuring by weight
    > provides better results than when measuring by volume.
    >


    You've made the most important decision!!!

    The book I mentioned is by Maggie Glezer, "Artisan Baking" (originally
    Artisan Baking Across North America).
    Now a paperback, ISBN: 13: 978-1-57965-291-3

    There are many other good bread-baking books and most are summarised in the
    FAQs of alt.bread.recipes where there is a bunch of very friendly and
    helpful people. The Glezer book isn't the only one on the subject but the
    Acme Bakery baguette recipe has been tried by others on a.b.r and is
    reckoned to be good.

    http://abrfaq.info/faq/88 click on Resources for an extensive book list. I
    have many of them and if you are interested I could recommend some (perhaps
    by e-mail) I take it that your address is not a spamtrap as mine is!

    As for the science, the bakers percentage system is very easy to grasp and
    allows you to scale the quantities of ingredients you need very easily. If
    you are interested, I'll e-mail an explanation tomorrow (it's late, I'm
    tired and I have an appointment tomorrow morning).
    Best wishes



  12. #12
    boulanger Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Alan Calan" ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what> went
    >> wrong:

    >
    > Using a motorized pasta roller/cutter with no experience, that's all.
    >>
    >> I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >> 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 easpoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >> It made very dry dough that would not come together.

    >
    > Yes, it certainly would. Unless making a regional specialty, I use 100 g
    > of flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the difference
    > among eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to keep it moving.
    >


    What sort of flour? I have some Italian "00" flour in the freezer that I
    use but some authors suggest semolina flour. I have some of that too.



  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    "boulanger" ha scritto nel messaggio >
    > "Giusi" wrote in message

    I use 100 g of flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the
    difference >> among eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to keep
    it moving.
    >>

    >
    > What sort of flour? I have some Italian "00" flour in the freezer that I
    > > use but some authors suggest semolina flour. I have some of that too.


    00 is merely soft wheat flour very finely ground. It weighs 130+- g per cup
    depending on humidity. o flour is the same but coarser, although it takes
    some examination to see it. It weighs 128+- per cup. 00 is what we use at
    home to make egg pasta.

    I make semolina pasta in the food processor using just water, salt and oil.
    It's harder to work than the soft wheat flour and is generally not used to
    make homemade egg pasta. I don't have any neighbors or friends who make
    semolina pasta, and really, the plain flour pasta is gobs cheaper and very
    easy so why screw around with it?

    In the US I use AP flour, adjusting during the rolling, dusting period.
    Hard wheat flour, usually called Manitoba here, costs euro 1.79 a kilo. 00
    I can buy for 34 centesimi.There would have to be some huge advantage for me
    to change over and there isn't.



  14. #14
    boulanger Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "boulanger" ha scritto nel messaggio >
    >> "Giusi" wrote in message

    > I use 100 g of flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up
    > the difference >> among eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta
    > to keep it moving.
    >>>

    >>
    >> What sort of flour? I have some Italian "00" flour in the freezer that I
    >> > use but some authors suggest semolina flour. I have some of that too.

    >
    > 00 is merely soft wheat flour very finely ground. It weighs 130+- g per
    > cup depending on humidity. o flour is the same but coarser, although it
    > takes some examination to see it. It weighs 128+- per cup. 00 is what we
    > use at home to make egg pasta.
    >
    > I make semolina pasta in the food processor using just water, salt and
    > oil. It's harder to work than the soft wheat flour and is generally not
    > used to make homemade egg pasta. I don't have any neighbors or friends
    > who make semolina pasta, and really, the plain flour pasta is gobs cheaper
    > and very easy so why screw around with it?
    >
    > In the US I use AP flour, adjusting during the rolling, dusting period.
    > Hard wheat flour, usually called Manitoba here, costs euro 1.79 a kilo.
    > 00 I can buy for 34 centesimi.There would have to be some huge advantage
    > for me to change over and there isn't.

    The AP flour here is fairly strong and can be used for bread making. Since
    there are several Italian grocers/supermarkets here that stock "00", I might
    as well use the real stuff.
    One author reckons the slightly coarser semolina flour results in a rougher
    textured pasta that the sauce can adhere to more easily. I agree with you
    on the plain flour pasta - why mess with something so simple?



  15. #15
    Alan Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    This is Mary Ann Esposito's Recipe

    INGREDIENTS4 large eggs 1/2 cup semolina flour
    About 2 1/2 cups King Arthur™ unbleached all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    DIRECTIONSTo make the dough in a food processor, put the eggs in the
    bowl of the processor and process until smooth. In a bowl, mix 2 1/2
    cups all-purpose flour, the semolina flour, and salt. Add the flour
    mixture to the eggs 1 cup at a time and process just until a ball of
    dough starts to form. Add a little water if the dough seems dry, a
    little more flour if it seems wet. The dough should not be so sticky
    that it clings to your fingers. Turn the dough out onto a floured
    surface and knead it, adding additional flour as necessary, for about
    5 minutes or until smooth. Cover and let rest for 10 minutes before
    rolling out and cutting into the desired shape,

    To make the dough the traditional way, combine 2 1/2 cups all-purpose
    flour, the semolina flour, and salt in a mound on a work surface. Make
    a well in the center of the flour and break the eggs into the well.
    Beat the eggs with a fork. Then, using the fork, gradually incorporate
    the flour from the inside walls of the well. When the dough becomes
    too firm to mix with the fork, knead it with your hands, incorporating
    just enough of the flour to make a soft but sticky dough. You may not
    need all the flour. Brush the excess flour aside and knead the dough,
    adding additional flour as necessary, for about 10 minutes or until
    smooth. Cover and let rest for 10 minutes before rolling out and
    cutting into the desired shape.

    Cut the dough into 4 pieces. Work with 1 piece at a time, keeping the
    remaining dough covered. Roll the dough out on a floured surface as
    thin as possible, or use a pasta machine to roll the dough out to the
    thinnest setting. Drape the sheets of pasta over dowel rods suspended
    between 2 chairs to dry slightly, about 5 minutes.

    **Those dowels are a great idea BUT our sheepdog loves pasta and I
    think he might even love the game of pulling the strips off the
    dowels. Mary Ann uses 3 cups of pasta and 4 eggs. The kitchen aid
    manual called for 3.5 cups of flour, three eggs and a tablespoon of
    water.**

    Cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling water until al dente, 2 to 3
    minutes. Drain, sauce, and serve immediately. Or dry and store the
    pasta: Hang the strips over dowel rods suspended between two chairs
    until very dry. (I usually leave it on the rods for a day.) When the
    ends of the pasta begin to curl, it is dry enough. Wrap it loosely in
    aluminum foil and store for up to 3 months.


    On Wed, 4 Mar 2009 18:58:20 -0700, "boulanger" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >>I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    >> went wrong:
    >>
    >> I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >> 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >> It made very dry dough that would not come together. So I started
    >> adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a cup or
    >> more.
    >>

    >
    >That's the trouble with stupid cup recipes! They never tell you how to fill
    >the cup and the weight can vary from 100g to >130g.
    >The recipe I have is:
    >300g flour
    >3 eggs
    >1 tsp salt
    >
    >


  16. #16
    Hoges in WA Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer


    "Alan Calan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    > also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what
    > went wrong:
    >
    >snipped>
    >I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    > became a nightmare. I did the best I could and then put the cut
    > linguini and a tent like shape. When I finished, everything stuck
    > together. I guess keeping it straight would have been the best idea.
    >

    snipped

    I had that problem with my KA pasta attachment so I went back to my manual
    roller one -
    with my daughter providing a third hand to guide the cut pasta out onto the
    bench,
    no problems at all again.

    I've never used the KA one again. I use my juice extractor and mincer a
    lot, though.
    Hoges in WA



  17. #17
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    In article <NJasl.25613$cu.19384@ne[email protected]>,
    "Hoges in WA" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've never used the KA one again. I use my juice extractor and mincer a
    > lot, though.
    > Hoges in WA


    What are you going to do with it? <Barb looks around to see if anyone is
    listening> Wanna sell it to me for cheap? (You've got an Australian
    address, though. If it's for real, the offer's off the table.)

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    "What you say about someone else says more
    about you than it does about the other person."

  18. #18
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    boulanger wrote:
    (snip)
    >
    > The book I mentioned is by Maggie Glezer, "Artisan Baking" (originally
    > Artisan Baking Across North America).
    > Now a paperback, ISBN: 13: 978-1-57965-291-3
    >
    > There are many other good bread-baking books and most are summarised in the
    > FAQs of alt.bread.recipes where there is a bunch of very friendly and
    > helpful people. The Glezer book isn't the only one on the subject but the
    > Acme Bakery baguette recipe has been tried by others on a.b.r and is
    > reckoned to be good.
    >
    > http://abrfaq.info/faq/88 click on Resources for an extensive book list. I
    > have many of them and if you are interested I could recommend some (perhaps
    > by e-mail) I take it that your address is not a spamtrap as mine is!
    >
    > As for the science, the bakers percentage system is very easy to grasp and
    > allows you to scale the quantities of ingredients you need very easily. If
    > you are interested, I'll e-mail an explanation tomorrow (it's late, I'm
    > tired and I have an appointment tomorrow morning).
    > Best wishes


    Thanks so much for the book recommendation and the ABR faq website
    address. I found a Glezer book (ISBN: 1579651178, "Artisan Baking
    Across North America") at the local library system and have it requested
    for pickup. I also found a DVD by King Arthur Flour called, "The baker's
    forum. Artisan breads [videorecording]." It's a 50-minutes show of some
    sort. So, I requested that one, too It will take me awhile to go
    through the ABR FAQ.

    Yes indeed, I would be very interested in your explanation about the
    bakers percentage system. Please email it to me. Just remove "NO SPAM"
    from my email address. Thanks again.

    Sky, who's playing with dough

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  19. #19
    Alan Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    On Thu, 5 Mar 2009 12:34:07 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Alan Calan" ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >> also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what> went
    >> wrong:

    >
    >Using a motorized pasta roller/cutter with no experience, that's all.

    I knew I had no experience and I wasn't expecting much and I didn't
    get much! However, when I tasted Barilla linguini a few days later, I
    realized, even with my hodge podge mess, there is no comparison
    between fresh and consumer storage pasta.
    >>
    >> I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >> roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >> 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 easpoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >> It made very dry dough that would not come together.

    >
    >Yes, it certainly would. Unless making a regional specialty, I use 100 g of
    >flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the difference among
    >eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to keep it moving.


    100 grams per egg is very easy to remember. I used only three eggs
    for 437grams. You would have used almost 4.5 eggs
    >
    >>>So I started> adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a 1/2 a
    >>>cup or> more.>

    >> The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    >> minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    >> the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    >> should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    >> linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    >> much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    >> videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.
    >>
    >> I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    >> cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    >> dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    >> rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end> under
    >> it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.

    >
    >I didn't really understand all that. For what it's worth I teach to roll
    >then cut, leaving a towel over the lumps of unused dough. Many don't fold
    >and roll anywhere near enough. Do that on number 1 until the pasta sheet,
    >which you have been dusting with flour, feels like damp skin.


    I was doing that but then I was holding the rolled pasta with one hand
    as I changed to the cutter with the other...so that was a little tough
    and that is when I decided to roll all then cut all. What I did not
    do, I can see that now from the videos below, is to lay out the rolled
    pasta and pust some flower or corn meal on them.

    Here are some of the videos I found; the first one uses 2.5 flour, 2
    eggs

    http://video.google.com/videosearch?...en&emb=0&aq=f#

    This one is 2.25 cups and 4 eggs and rice flour during the resting,
    rolling, cutting and waiting stages to keep it from sticking
    http://video.google.com/videosearch?...en&emb=0&aq=f#
    >


    One method called for just egg yokes but I don't have that here.

    This video was very interesting, although all by hand but you can see
    what the pasta should look like.
    http://video.google.com/videosearch?...en&emb=0&aq=f#

    >> I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    >> became a nightmare.

    >
    >It dried because it was left too long. You can't possibly work fast enough
    >the first (100) time to leave pasta sheets around. Nobody cam, it's not
    >your fault.

    Well, there were lots of factors that could have made the process
    easier, like a place to put the rolled sheet while I switch between
    roller and cutter but things where not in good positions

    >
    >When I finished, everything stuck
    >> together.

    >
    >When your cut pasta exits the cutter, drop it on some flour and gently
    >swoosh with your fingers then arrange as you please. Alternatively, have a
    >clothes drying rack ready and lay the pasta strings on flour then gently
    >transfer onto the rack. They will at least be separate, although they also
    >dry quickly.
    >
    >> I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma> said
    >> she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the> mountain of
    >> flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and> incorporating the
    >> flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I> wonder if I used too much
    >> water.

    >
    >I am sure you did. Don't add any at all and use her technique. You will
    >quickly find that you can't add too much flour, it won't let you. The
    >crumbly bits you begin with start to smooth out and become stretchy as the
    >egg takes up the flour. It is simply one of the most sensuous kitchen
    >chores there is. The more you feel your way through the work, the better
    >the pasta. Then refrigerate 30 mins or so in pieces wrapped in plastic.
    >


  20. #20
    Alan Guest

    Default Re: Help! Kitchen Aid pasta roller & cutters attachments for mixer

    On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 06:01:07 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Giusi said...
    >
    >> "Alan Calan" ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>>I bought one of those on Sunday in anticipation of the snow storm. I
    >>> also wanted to use up a William Sonoma credit that I had. So, what>
    >>> went wrong:

    >>
    >> Using a motorized pasta roller/cutter with no experience, that's all.
    >>>
    >>> I followed the recipe for egg pasta provided in the manual of the
    >>> roller/cutters. It said 3.5 cups of flour (I used 125 grams x 3.5 or
    >>> 437 grams), 3 eggs, 1/2 easpoon of salt and one tablespoon of water.
    >>> It made very dry dough that would not come together.

    >>
    >> Yes, it certainly would. Unless making a regional specialty, I use 100
    >> g of flour and one egg, pinch of salt. Period. You make up the
    >> difference among eggs during the rolling when you flour the pasta to
    >> keep it moving.
    >>
    >>>>So I started> adding water and I'd bet all in all I added close to a
    >>>>1/2 a cup or> more.>
    >>> The dough seemed better. I cut it into 4 pieces and let it sit for 20
    >>> minutes. I then made the first batch of linguini. I ran it through
    >>> the roller till I got to five, only folding on the #1 setting. What
    >>> should I have done next? I took out the roller and put in the
    >>> linguini cutter. It worked pretty well even though the linguini was
    >>> much too long. I put the linguini in a twisted pile like they do in
    >>> videos. I just remembered there might be some you tubes on this.
    >>>
    >>> I put the roller back and did the next piece of dough but this time
    >>> cutting it in half again. So now what again? do I roll out all the
    >>> dough and then cut? That is what I did but I did not lay out the
    >>> rolled pasta dough straight, I folded it once crossing over the end>
    >>> under it. I did that 6 times and then put in the cutter.

    >>
    >> I didn't really understand all that. For what it's worth I teach to
    >> roll then cut, leaving a towel over the lumps of unused dough. Many
    >> don't fold and roll anywhere near enough. Do that on number 1 until the
    >> pasta sheet, which you have been dusting with flour, feels like damp
    >> skin.
    >>
    >>> I could not separate the dough into a straight piece again and it
    >>> became a nightmare.

    >>
    >> It dried because it was left too long. You can't possibly work fast
    >> enough the first (100) time to leave pasta sheets around. Nobody cam,
    >> it's not your fault.
    >>
    >> When I finished, everything stuck
    >>> together.

    >>
    >> When your cut pasta exits the cutter, drop it on some flour and gently
    >> swoosh with your fingers then arrange as you please. Alternatively,
    >> have a clothes drying rack ready and lay the pasta strings on flour then
    >> gently transfer onto the rack. They will at least be separate, although
    >> they also dry quickly.
    >>
    >>> I'd appreciate any technique questions. The woman in William Sonoma>
    >>> said she makes the dough on the counter, making a whole in the>
    >>> mountain of flour and putting the eggs and water in the hole and>
    >>> incorporating the flour. She said it makes for lighter pasta. I>
    >>> wonder if I used too much water.

    >>
    >> I am sure you did. Don't add any at all and use her technique. You
    >> will quickly find that you can't add too much flour, it won't let you.
    >> The crumbly bits you begin with start to smooth out and become stretchy
    >> as the egg takes up the flour. It is simply one of the most sensuous
    >> kitchen chores there is. The more you feel your way through the work,
    >> the better the pasta. Then refrigerate 30 mins or so in pieces wrapped
    >> in plastic.

    >
    >
    >Run a string across from one cabinet knob to another. Buy a set of plastic
    >coat hangers, clean thoroughly.
    >
    >Make golfball size dough clumps. Work from 1 to 5 roller settings and then
    >hang on a hanger. Repeat for all the dough. Then switch to a pasta cutter
    >and feed each pasta sheet through and re-hang cut pasta. Repeat until done.
    >
    >Take a hanger of pasta and trim with scissors over the pot of boiling
    >water.
    >
    >Suggestion: I add 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric to the dough while mixing to
    >golden it up a bit. More visually appealing, imho.
    >
    >Homemade pasta is the most fun mess I can make in the kitchen! ))


    It sure is a mess! I have no knobs on my cabinets but I am getting
    great ideas.
    >
    >Andy


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