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Thread: Help: breaking yolks

  1. #1
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Help: breaking yolks

    Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    doing wrong?

  2. #2
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: breaking yolks


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:f230d0d7-e44a-4813-9ff2-6c9a93f0893b@li6g20[email protected]..
    > Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    > lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    > doing wrong?


    are the eggs a bit old?



  3. #3
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    In article <f230d0d7-e44a-4813-9ff2-
    [email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    > lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    > doing wrong?


    Bad eye make up?

    Crack each egg against the lip of a cup and empty it into the cup. I
    still do this every time for fried eggs, and I have fried a zillion
    which had to be perfect and unbroken.

    If the yolk is unbroken, gently tip the egg into the hot waiting pan.
    Give it a minute or two in peace before you start skipping fat over the
    top or sliding it around.

    If the egg in the cup has a broken yolk, save it for cooking, or hope
    someone's going to ask for omelette/scrambled eggs.

    Janet UK

  4. #4
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 06:35:23 -0700, "Pico Rico"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    >> lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    >> doing wrong?

    >
    >are the eggs a bit old?
    >

    That would have been my guess. Unfortunately, when you buy a carton
    of eggs you don't really know how old they are despite the date on the
    carton.
    In the old days of chickens running about the yard, I would have
    guessed a seasonal food change.
    Janet US

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 14:49:06 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >
    > If the egg in the cup has a broken yolk, save it for cooking, or hope
    >someone's going to ask for omelette/scrambled eggs.
    >
    > Janet UK


    that's easy -- that's when the dog starts nudging my hip and telling
    me that scrambled is just fine for his breakfast ;o)
    Janet US

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 06:20:07 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    > lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    > doing wrong?


    Battery raised eggs just seem to be more fragile than organic, so
    there's always that variable. But AFAIC - after you check out the age
    of your eggs, the next thing you should do is make sure you're still
    buying grade AA and not A eggs. Grade is usually why my eggs don't
    "behave" the way they should. You could also try breaking them into a
    small custard cup and then can pour them into the pan from the cup.
    Since you have a fail safe step now, set aside the eggs with broken
    yolks and make omelets with those the following day or use them for
    something else.
    <http://www.thebudgetfashionista.com/archive/wanted-to-know-about-eggs/>
    HTH

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  7. #7
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks



    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 12 May 2013 06:20:07 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    >> lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    >> doing wrong?

    >
    > Battery raised eggs just seem to be more fragile than organic, so
    > there's always that variable. But AFAIC - after you check out the age
    > of your eggs, the next thing you should do is make sure you're still
    > buying grade AA and not A eggs. Grade is usually why my eggs don't
    > "behave" the way they should. You could also try breaking them into a
    > small custard cup and then can pour them into the pan from the cup.
    > Since you have a fail safe step now, set aside the eggs with broken
    > yolks and make omelets with those the following day or use them for
    > something else.
    > <http://www.thebudgetfashionista.com/archive/wanted-to-know-about-eggs/>
    > HTH


    I didn't know the difference between your A or AA eggs until I read that
    site, but the rest sounds just about right

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 15:55:09 +0100, "Ophelia"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I didn't know the difference between your A or AA eggs until I read that
    > site, but the rest sounds just about right


    How do they grade eggs in Europe?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  9. #9
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks



    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 12 May 2013 15:55:09 +0100, "Ophelia"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I didn't know the difference between your A or AA eggs until I read that
    >> site, but the rest sounds just about right

    >
    > How do they grade eggs in Europe?


    A,B and C

    Lots of info here:

    http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm...ts/eggqual.pdf

    "these are:
    .. Class A ('fresh eggs'). These may further be sold as
    'Extra' Fresh if the air space is less than 4mm in height at
    the time of candling and throughout its marketable seven
    days from packing.
    .. Class B ('certain second quality or preserved eggs').
    .. Class C ('non graded eggs intended for the manufacture
    of foodstuffs for human consumption')."

    Then of course, we have different sizes which I think I different to your.
    I think ours are small, med, large and extra large. From what I have read
    here, our large are your extra large.

    I see the reference to 'candling' I don't see it any more, but when i was a
    girl, when we bought eggs, the shop had a light box over which they placed
    each egg to check them

    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  10. #10
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >
    > Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    > lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    > doing wrong?


    Never fails with me....fry 3 eggs and one of the yolks will break. oh well

    G.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 16:15:37 +0100, "Ophelia"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > How do they grade eggs in Europe?

    >
    > A,B and C
    >
    > Lots of info here:
    >
    > http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm...ts/eggqual.pdf
    >
    > "these are:
    > . Class A ('fresh eggs'). These may further be sold as
    > 'Extra' Fresh if the air space is less than 4mm in height at
    > the time of candling and throughout its marketable seven
    > days from packing.
    > . Class B ('certain second quality or preserved eggs').
    > . Class C ('non graded eggs intended for the manufacture
    > of foodstuffs for human consumption')."
    >

    Thanks.

    > Then of course, we have different sizes which I think I different to your.
    > I think ours are small, med, large and extra large. From what I have read
    > here, our large are your extra large.
    >

    I've read that too. I tend to use extra large eggs anyway (unless
    large is at a price I just can't say no to).

    > I see the reference to 'candling' I don't see it any more, but when i was a
    > girl, when we bought eggs, the shop had a light box over which they placed
    > each egg to check them


    I always thought candling was how farmers made sure their barnyard
    eggs weren't fertilized and had something growing inside. Still don't
    see how they can grade the whites by candling.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On 5/12/2013 11:15 AM, Ophelia wrote:

    > Then of course, we have different sizes which I think I different to your.
    > I think ours are small, med, large and extra large. From what I have
    > read here, our large are your extra large.
    >


    Egg Sizes

    Old UK Modern UK/EU USA Canada

    0=75g+
    1=70-74g Very lg 73g+ Jumbo 71g+ Jumbo 70g+ 2=65-69g Lg
    63-72g Ex-lg 64-70g Ex-lg 63-69g
    3=60-64g Med 53-62g Lg 57-63g Lg 56-62g
    4=55-59g Med 53-62g xxx xxx
    5=50-54g Sm 53g or less Med 50-56g Med 49-55g
    6=45-50g Sm 43-49g Sm 42-48g Med 43-51g

    7=44g or less Peewee35-42g Peewee 41g or less

    Australian eggs sizes are slightly different.



  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks



    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 12 May 2013 16:15:37 +0100, "Ophelia"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> > How do they grade eggs in Europe?

    >>
    >> A,B and C
    >>
    >> Lots of info here:
    >>
    >> http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm...ts/eggqual.pdf
    >>
    >> "these are:
    >> . Class A ('fresh eggs'). These may further be sold as
    >> 'Extra' Fresh if the air space is less than 4mm in height at
    >> the time of candling and throughout its marketable seven
    >> days from packing.
    >> . Class B ('certain second quality or preserved eggs').
    >> . Class C ('non graded eggs intended for the manufacture
    >> of foodstuffs for human consumption')."
    >>

    > Thanks.
    >
    >> Then of course, we have different sizes which I think I different to
    >> your.
    >> I think ours are small, med, large and extra large. From what I have
    >> read
    >> here, our large are your extra large.
    >>

    > I've read that too. I tend to use extra large eggs anyway (unless
    > large is at a price I just can't say no to).
    >
    >> I see the reference to 'candling' I don't see it any more, but when i
    >> was a
    >> girl, when we bought eggs, the shop had a light box over which they
    >> placed
    >> each egg to check them

    >
    > I always thought candling was how farmers made sure their barnyard
    > eggs weren't fertilized and had something growing inside. Still don't
    > see how they can grade the whites by candling.


    Noooooooooooo they used to check if they were good)

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  14. #14
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]d says...
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Sun, 12 May 2013 15:55:09 +0100, "Ophelia"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I didn't know the difference between your A or AA eggs until I read that
    > >> site, but the rest sounds just about right

    > >
    > > How do they grade eggs in Europe?

    >
    > A,B and C
    >
    > Lots of info here:
    >
    > http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm...ts/eggqual.pdf
    >
    > "these are:
    > . Class A ('fresh eggs'). These may further be sold as
    > 'Extra' Fresh if the air space is less than 4mm in height at
    > the time of candling and throughout its marketable seven
    > days from packing.
    > . Class B ('certain second quality or preserved eggs').
    > . Class C ('non graded eggs intended for the manufacture
    > of foodstuffs for human consumption')."


    In UK and Europe only Grade A eggs are on retail sale to the public

    http://www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/dis...ggs/marketing/

    <quote>

    Class A eggs are eggs-in-shell that have certain quality characteristics
    and are intended for human consumption through retail and catering
    outlets.

    Class B eggs do not meet the quality characteristics and cannot be
    marketed for human consumption unless they have been heat treated
    (pasteurised). These are commonly used in catering produce, as egg
    liquid or powder etc.

    All Class (Grade) A eggs sold at retail level and public markets within
    the European Union (EU) must be stamped with a code identifying the:

    method of production ? e.g. organic(0), free range(1), barn(2) or
    cage(3)
    country of origin
    specific hen laying establishment number.

    <end quote>.



    Janet UK

  15. #15
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks



    "S Viemeister" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 5/12/2013 11:15 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >
    >> Then of course, we have different sizes which I think I different to
    >> your.
    >> I think ours are small, med, large and extra large. From what I have
    >> read here, our large are your extra large.
    >>

    >
    > Egg Sizes
    >
    > Old UK Modern UK/EU USA Canada
    > 0=75g+ 1=70-74g Very lg 73g+ Jumbo 71g+ Jumbo 70g+ 2=65-69g Lg
    > 63-72g Ex-lg 64-70g Ex-lg 63-69g 3=60-64g Med 53-62g Lg 57-63g
    > Lg 56-62g 4=55-59g Med 53-62g xxx xxx
    > 5=50-54g Sm 53g or less Med 50-56g Med 49-55g 6=45-50g Sm 43-49g
    > Sm 42-48g Med 43-51g
    >
    > 7=44g or less Peewee35-42g Peewee 41g or less
    >
    > Australian eggs sizes are slightly different.


    Thanks, Sheila. I think that answered the question very well)

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On Sun, 12 May 2013 17:31:28 +0100, "Ophelia"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > I always thought candling was how farmers made sure their barnyard
    > > eggs weren't fertilized and had something growing inside. Still don't
    > > see how they can grade the whites by candling.

    >
    > Noooooooooooo they used to check if they were good)


    Now I'm thoroughly confused. How can you tell if they're "good"
    without cracking them open? I suppose you'd know if they were rotted
    and black inside, but other than that...

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  17. #17
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks

    On May 12, 12:12*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sun, 12 May 2013 17:31:28 +0100, "Ophelia"
    >
    > <Ophe...@elsinore.me.ku.invalid> wrote:
    > > > I always thought candling was how farmers made sure their barnyard
    > > > eggs weren't fertilized and had something growing inside. *Still don't
    > > > see how they can grade the whites by candling.

    >
    > > Noooooooooooo they used to check if they were good)

    >
    > Now I'm thoroughly confused. *How can you tell if they're "good"
    > without cracking them open? *I suppose you'd know if they were rotted
    > and black inside, but other than that...
    >
    > --
    > Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


    Well, one thing is the older they are, the closer to one end of the
    shell they are.

    N.


  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

  19. #19
    bigwheel Guest

    Default Re: Help: breaking yolks


    spamtrap1888;1833909 Wrote:
    > Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    > lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    > doing wrong?


    Hmmm. When you break the shell do it on a flat surface and not on the
    sharp edge of anything. Use real good fresh eggs AA if you can find
    some..or better buy them from Farmer Brown. Fresh country eggs are a
    real treat. When cooking start with lowish to moderate heat and adjust
    from there. Might also try to let them come up to room temp before
    using. Best of fortunes on it.




    --
    bigwheel

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: breaking yolks

    On 5/12/2013 9:35 AM, Pico Rico wrote:
    > "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Frying eggs I never used to have a problem with breaking yolks, but
    >> lately they break just by looking at them the wrong way. What am I
    >> doing wrong?

    >
    > are the eggs a bit old?
    >
    >

    Or cold from the fridge?

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not." in Reply To.

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