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Thread: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

  1. #1
    phil..c Guest

    Default Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    while browsing the toaster web site


    discovered that our old one is exactly this model

    It was mums and it still gets used probably once a month and the two
    bowls are still intact

    Which in itself is a miracle

    There is another one packed away somewhere as well
    never realised they were worth this much to collectors

    I think mum got it as as an anniversary present

    Also have two old hand wound egg beaters that must be over 60 years
    old and get a work out every so often

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...

    > http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    > while browsing the toaster web site
    >


    I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and have
    managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and received as
    wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and toaster. I guess my
    mom was very careful with her appliaces because all three are still in near
    mint condition, though they all had frequent use, and still operate
    flawlessly. My grandmother had a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than
    the one in the picture. I also have it and it also still works flawlessly.
    I have a toaster from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand
    offhand. Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s,
    a Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are all
    intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on the other
    pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I sometimes uses a
    ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.

    Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting display
    in the kitchen.

    There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.

    Enjoy your Mixmaster!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  3. #3
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    phil..c wrote:
    >
    > http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    > while browsing the toaster web site
    >
    > discovered that our old one is exactly this model
    >
    > It was mums and it still gets used probably once a month and the two
    > bowls are still intact
    >
    > Which in itself is a miracle
    >
    > There is another one packed away somewhere as well
    > never realised they were worth this much to collectors
    >
    > I think mum got it as as an anniversary present
    >
    > Also have two old hand wound egg beaters that must be over 60 years
    > old and get a work out every so often


    My dearly beloved grandmother's mixer looked exactly like that one, two
    bowls & all ;> Thanks for prompting such fond memories. It's a shame
    that many "modern" made products don't last nearly as long as the
    'older' sorts do.

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  4. #4
    T Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    In article <[email protected] 7>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >
    > > http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    > > while browsing the toaster web site
    > >

    >
    > I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and have
    > managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and received as
    > wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and toaster. I guess my
    > mom was very careful with her appliaces because all three are still in near
    > mint condition, though they all had frequent use, and still operate
    > flawlessly. My grandmother had a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than
    > the one in the picture. I also have it and it also still works flawlessly.
    > I have a toaster from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand
    > offhand. Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s,
    > a Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    > collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are all
    > intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on the other
    > pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I sometimes uses a
    > ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >
    > Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting display
    > in the kitchen.
    >
    > There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >
    > Enjoy your Mixmaster!


    You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project is
    wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    weekend.



  5. #5
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...

    > In article <[email protected] 7>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>
    >> > http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >> > while browsing the toaster web site
    >> >

    >>
    >> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and have
    >> managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and received
    >> as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and toaster. I
    >> guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces because all three are
    >> still in near mint condition, though they all had frequent use, and
    >> still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an
    >> older model than the one in the picture. I also have it and it also
    >> still works flawlessly. I have a toaster from 1923, very decorative,
    >> but I can't remember the brand offhand. Other items include a Hamilton
    >> Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the
    >> 1940s (from a drugstore), and a collection of glass vacuum coffee
    >> makers. The coffee makers are all intact, but only one can still be
    >> used. The rubber gaskets on the other pots have hardened and cannot be
    >> replaced. The one I sometimes uses a ground glass seal rather than
    >> rubber gasket.
    >>
    >> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >> display in the kitchen.
    >>
    >> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>
    >> Enjoy your Mixmaster!

    >
    > You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project is
    > wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    > weekend.


    Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones. Before
    we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar to the one in
    the following picture, except that the base is heavy brass. The handset is
    bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also have the wall mounted bell box
    that goes witih it. I wish I had kept more of them.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  6. #6
    Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:27:31 -0500, Sky <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >My dearly beloved grandmother's mixer looked exactly like that one, two
    >bowls & all ;> Thanks for prompting such fond memories. It's a shame
    >that many "modern" made products don't last nearly as long as the
    >'older' sorts do.
    >
    >Sky


    My Moms Sunbeam Mixmaster ( ca 1950s )
    was a workhorse in the kitchen. It performed flawlessly,
    automatically spinning the bowl, and mixing right to the edge.

    My wife bought her Sunbeam in the 1970's.
    It looked the same, but whatta piece of crap.
    And those pretend "dough hooks"?
    In time, it was relegated to that storage space
    where unwanted utensils go to die.

    Too bad... because the choice of mixers on the market
    is pretty much the ( overpriced ) KitchenAid.... and not much else.

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >
    >> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >> [email protected] says...
    >>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>
    >>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and have
    >>> managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and received
    >>> as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and toaster. I
    >>> guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces because all three are
    >>> still in near mint condition, though they all had frequent use, and
    >>> still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an
    >>> older model than the one in the picture. I also have it and it also
    >>> still works flawlessly. I have a toaster from 1923, very decorative,
    >>> but I can't remember the brand offhand. Other items include a Hamilton
    >>> Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the
    >>> 1940s (from a drugstore), and a collection of glass vacuum coffee
    >>> makers. The coffee makers are all intact, but only one can still be
    >>> used. The rubber gaskets on the other pots have hardened and cannot be
    >>> replaced. The one I sometimes uses a ground glass seal rather than
    >>> rubber gasket.
    >>>
    >>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >>> display in the kitchen.
    >>>
    >>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>
    >>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!

    >> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project is
    >> wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    >> weekend.

    >
    > Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones. Before
    > we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar to the one in
    > the following picture, except that the base is heavy brass. The handset is
    > bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also have the wall mounted bell box
    > that goes witih it. I wish I had kept more of them.
    >


    Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    mouthpiece....

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Wed 01 Apr 2009 06:14:51p, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >>
    >>> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >>> [email protected] says...
    >>>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>>
    >>>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>>
    >>>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and
    >>>> have managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and
    >>>> received as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and
    >>>> toaster. I guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces because
    >>>> all three are still in near mint condition, though they all had
    >>>> frequent use, and still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had a
    >>>> Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than the one in the picture. I
    >>>> also have it and it also still works flawlessly. I have a toaster
    >>>> from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand offhand.
    >>>> Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a
    >>>> Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    >>>> collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are all
    >>>> intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on the
    >>>> other pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I sometimes
    >>>> uses a ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >>>> display in the kitchen.
    >>>>
    >>>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>>
    >>>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!
    >>> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project
    >>> is wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    >>> weekend.

    >>
    >> Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones.
    >> Before we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar
    >> to the one in the following picture, except that the base is heavy
    >> brass. The handset is bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also have
    >> the wall mounted bell box that goes witih it. I wish I had kept more
    >> of them.
    >>

    >
    > Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    > mouthpiece....
    >


    Oops! Here it is. This is not my phone, but the style is identical. Mine
    has an all brass base and cradle. The handset is bakelite.

    http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=27wu8ux&s=5

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  9. #9
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    "<RJ>" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > My Moms Sunbeam Mixmaster ( ca 1950s )
    > was a workhorse in the kitchen. It performed flawlessly,
    > automatically spinning the bowl, and mixing right to the edge.


    > My wife bought her Sunbeam in the 1970's.
    > It looked the same, but whatta piece of crap.


    I had the same experiences. Remembering my mothers workhorse
    Mixmaster I bought one in the 1970s for my wife and myself.
    It was junk.

    > Too bad... because the choice of mixers on the market
    > is pretty much the ( overpriced ) KitchenAid.... and not much else.


    Well, apparently somebody at Sunbeam got a clue because they
    now have a Mixmaster "Heritage" model that is metal bodied
    and styled more like the old ones. I have read some good
    reviews, and I'm tempted, but have not gotten one yet.

    If anyone else has, or gets one, please let RFC know how it
    works.

    Bill Ranck
    Blacksburg, Va.

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 01 Apr 2009 06:14:51p, Jean B. told us...
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >>>
    >>>> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >>>> [email protected] says...
    >>>>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and
    >>>>> have managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and
    >>>>> received as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and
    >>>>> toaster. I guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces because
    >>>>> all three are still in near mint condition, though they all had
    >>>>> frequent use, and still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had a
    >>>>> Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than the one in the picture. I
    >>>>> also have it and it also still works flawlessly. I have a toaster
    >>>>> from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand offhand.
    >>>>> Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a
    >>>>> Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    >>>>> collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are all
    >>>>> intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on the
    >>>>> other pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I sometimes
    >>>>> uses a ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >>>>> display in the kitchen.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!
    >>>> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project
    >>>> is wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    >>>> weekend.
    >>> Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones.
    >>> Before we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar
    >>> to the one in the following picture, except that the base is heavy
    >>> brass. The handset is bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also have
    >>> the wall mounted bell box that goes witih it. I wish I had kept more
    >>> of them.
    >>>

    >> Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    >> mouthpiece....
    >>

    >
    > Oops! Here it is. This is not my phone, but the style is identical. Mine
    > has an all brass base and cradle. The handset is bakelite.
    >
    > http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=27wu8ux&s=5
    >

    Definitely not a stick phone then. Mine is like this:

    http://www.antiquehelper.com/auctionimages/22059t.jpg

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Fri 03 Apr 2009 10:55:28a, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 06:14:51p, Jean B. told us...
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >>>>
    >>>>> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >>>>> [email protected] says...
    >>>>>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>>>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and
    >>>>>> have managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and
    >>>>>> received as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and
    >>>>>> toaster. I guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces
    >>>>>> because all three are still in near mint condition, though they all
    >>>>>> had frequent use, and still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had
    >>>>>> a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than the one in the picture. I
    >>>>>> also have it and it also still works flawlessly. I have a toaster
    >>>>>> from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand offhand.
    >>>>>> Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a
    >>>>>> Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    >>>>>> collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are
    >>>>>> all intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on
    >>>>>> the other pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I
    >>>>>> sometimes uses a ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >>>>>> display in the kitchen.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!
    >>>>> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project
    >>>>> is wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    >>>>> weekend.
    >>>> Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones.
    >>>> Before we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar
    >>>> to the one in the following picture, except that the base is heavy
    >>>> brass. The handset is bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also
    >>>> have the wall mounted bell box that goes witih it. I wish I had kept
    >>>> more of them.
    >>>>
    >>> Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    >>> mouthpiece....
    >>>

    >>
    >> Oops! Here it is. This is not my phone, but the style is identical.
    >> Mine has an all brass base and cradle. The handset is bakelite.
    >>
    >> http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=27wu8ux&s=5
    >>

    > Definitely not a stick phone then. Mine is like this:
    >
    > http://www.antiquehelper.com/auctionimages/22059t.jpg
    >


    No, I know from stick phones. My grandparents had one, but without a dial.
    I can still remember picking up the receiver and the operator answering
    with "What number please?" You also asked the same operator for
    information and even the time of day. :-)

    Our two brass phones would make a nice pair! :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  12. #12
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Fri 03 Apr 2009 10:55:28a, Jean B. told us...
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 06:14:51p, Jean B. told us...
    >>>
    >>>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >>>>>> [email protected] says...
    >>>>>>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>>>>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances and
    >>>>>>> have managed to collect a few. My parents were married in 1937 and
    >>>>>>> received as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater mixer, and
    >>>>>>> toaster. I guess my mom was very careful with her appliaces
    >>>>>>> because all three are still in near mint condition, though they all
    >>>>>>> had frequent use, and still operate flawlessly. My grandmother had
    >>>>>>> a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than the one in the picture. I
    >>>>>>> also have it and it also still works flawlessly. I have a toaster
    >>>>>>> from 1923, very decorative, but I can't remember the brand offhand.
    >>>>>>> Other items include a Hamilton Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a
    >>>>>>> Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a
    >>>>>>> collection of glass vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are
    >>>>>>> all intact, but only one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on
    >>>>>>> the other pots have hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I
    >>>>>>> sometimes uses a ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an interesting
    >>>>>>> display in the kitchen.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!
    >>>>>> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend project
    >>>>>> is wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line phones this
    >>>>>> weekend.
    >>>>> Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones.
    >>>>> Before we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is similar
    >>>>> to the one in the following picture, except that the base is heavy
    >>>>> brass. The handset is bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece. I also
    >>>>> have the wall mounted bell box that goes witih it. I wish I had kept
    >>>>> more of them.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    >>>> mouthpiece....
    >>>>
    >>> Oops! Here it is. This is not my phone, but the style is identical.
    >>> Mine has an all brass base and cradle. The handset is bakelite.
    >>>
    >>> http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=27wu8ux&s=5
    >>>

    >> Definitely not a stick phone then. Mine is like this:
    >>
    >> http://www.antiquehelper.com/auctionimages/22059t.jpg
    >>

    >
    > No, I know from stick phones. My grandparents had one, but without a dial.
    > I can still remember picking up the receiver and the operator answering
    > with "What number please?" You also asked the same operator for
    > information and even the time of day. :-)
    >
    > Our two brass phones would make a nice pair! :-)
    >

    They would, wouldn't they? I guess the ones lacking a dial would
    be of no use now. Mine actually works. We have another rotary
    phone, not very old. It is funny when my daughter's friends are
    here, because they don't know how to use them!

    --
    Jean B.

  13. #13
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Fri 03 Apr 2009 02:20:17p, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Fri 03 Apr 2009 10:55:28a, Jean B. told us...
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 06:14:51p, Jean B. told us...
    >>>>
    >>>>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>>>> On Wed 01 Apr 2009 10:38:53a, T told us...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> In article <[email protected] 7>,
    >>>>>>> [email protected] says...
    >>>>>>>> On Tue 31 Mar 2009 06:54:08p, phil..c told us...
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> http://www.toastercentral.com/asunmix10.jpg
    >>>>>>>>> while browsing the toaster web site
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I'm very interested in vintage and antique electric appliances
    >>>>>>>> and have managed to collect a few. My parents were married in
    >>>>>>>> 1937 and received as wedding gifts a GE waffle iron, 3-beater
    >>>>>>>> mixer, and toaster. I guess my mom was very careful with her
    >>>>>>>> appliaces because all three are still in near mint condition,
    >>>>>>>> though they all had frequent use, and still operate flawlessly.
    >>>>>>>> My grandmother had a Sunbeam Mixmaster, an older model than the
    >>>>>>>> one in the picture. I also have it and it also still works
    >>>>>>>> flawlessly. I have a toaster from 1923, very decorative, but I
    >>>>>>>> can't remember the brand offhand. Other items include a Hamilton
    >>>>>>>> Beach stand mixer from the 1930s, a Hamilton Beach Malt Mixer
    >>>>>>>> from the 1940s (from a drugstore), and a collection of glass
    >>>>>>>> vacuum coffee makers. The coffee makers are all intact, but only
    >>>>>>>> one can still be used. The rubber gaskets on the other pots have
    >>>>>>>> hardened and cannot be replaced. The one I sometimes uses a
    >>>>>>>> ground glass seal rather than rubber gasket.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Anyway, they're fun to have and fun to use, and make an
    >>>>>>>> interesting display in the kitchen.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There was no apparent planned obselecence in the old days.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Enjoy your Mixmaster!
    >>>>>>> You collect old appliances, I collect old phones. My weekend
    >>>>>>> project is wiring up my old 1A2 key-switch unit to my multi-line
    >>>>>>> phones this weekend.
    >>>>>> Years ago when I worked for the Bell System I collected old phones.
    >>>>>> Before we moved to Arizona I sold all but one of them. It is
    >>>>>> similar to the one in the following picture, except that the base
    >>>>>> is heavy brass. The handset is bakelite with a cupped mouthpiece.
    >>>>>> I also have the wall mounted bell box that goes witih it. I wish I
    >>>>>> had kept more of them.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Um, where's the pic? I have a brass stick phone, with a bakelite
    >>>>> mouthpiece....
    >>>>>
    >>>> Oops! Here it is. This is not my phone, but the style is identical.
    >>>> Mine has an all brass base and cradle. The handset is bakelite.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=27wu8ux&s=5
    >>>>
    >>> Definitely not a stick phone then. Mine is like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.antiquehelper.com/auctionimages/22059t.jpg
    >>>

    >>
    >> No, I know from stick phones. My grandparents had one, but without a
    >> dial. I can still remember picking up the receiver and the operator
    >> answering with "What number please?" You also asked the same operator
    >> for information and even the time of day. :-)
    >>
    >> Our two brass phones would make a nice pair! :-)
    >>

    > They would, wouldn't they? I guess the ones lacking a dial would
    > be of no use now. Mine actually works. We have another rotary
    > phone, not very old. It is funny when my daughter's friends are
    > here, because they don't know how to use them!
    >


    My brass phone works just fine, as does the wall-mounted bell box. Phones
    lacking the dial are still useful as extensions that can be answered. You
    just can't originate calls.

    It seems only friends around my age really know how to use a dial phone. I
    remember the first time one of David's daughters visited our house in Ohio
    and wanted to make a call. The closest phone was a dial phone, to which
    she questioned, "where are the buttons to push?"

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > My brass phone works just fine, as does the wall-mounted bell box. Phones
    > lacking the dial are still useful as extensions that can be answered. You
    > just can't originate calls.
    >
    > It seems only friends around my age really know how to use a dial phone. I
    > remember the first time one of David's daughters visited our house in Ohio
    > and wanted to make a call. The closest phone was a dial phone, to which
    > she questioned, "where are the buttons to push?"
    >

    It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well
    when one is instructed to press certain buttons.

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #15
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Sat, 04 Apr 2009 08:27:05 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well
    >when one is instructed to press certain buttons.


    And kids today have never seen a phone number like IV-8-2450. The
    I-V was for the Ivanhoe exchange in Lansing MI. Our familes home
    number before area codes were even contemplated.


  16. #16
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    > On Sat, 04 Apr 2009 08:27:05 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well
    >> when one is instructed to press certain buttons.

    >
    > And kids today have never seen a phone number like IV-8-2450. The
    > I-V was for the Ivanhoe exchange in Lansing MI. Our familes home
    > number before area codes were even contemplated.
    >

    Ah yes. I am still well aware of the word prefix for our phone
    number.

    --
    Jean B.

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Sat 04 Apr 2009 05:27:05a, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> My brass phone works just fine, as does the wall-mounted bell box.
    >> Phones lacking the dial are still useful as extensions that can be
    >> answered. You just can't originate calls.
    >>
    >> It seems only friends around my age really know how to use a dial
    >> phone. I remember the first time one of David's daughters visited our
    >> house in Ohio and wanted to make a call. The closest phone was a dial
    >> phone, to which she questioned, "where are the buttons to push?"
    >>

    > It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well
    > when one is instructed to press certain buttons.
    >


    Yes, that could make it very frustrating. :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  18. #18
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    On Sat 04 Apr 2009 06:52:24a, Jean B. told us...

    > Mr. Bill wrote:
    >> On Sat, 04 Apr 2009 08:27:05 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well when
    >>> one is instructed to press certain buttons.

    >>
    >> And kids today have never seen a phone number like IV-8-2450. The
    >> I-V was for the Ivanhoe exchange in Lansing MI. Our familes home
    >> number before area codes were even contemplated.
    >>

    > Ah yes. I am still well aware of the word prefix for our phone
    > number.
    >


    I remember converting from letter prefixes to numbers. It was briefly
    frustrating. There were some odd coincidences with the letters, too. In
    Ohio, our home number was in the TUxedo exchange, whereas my dad's ofice was
    in the UTah exchange, so both began 88...

    Lest we never forget the movie title, BUtterfield 8.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  19. #19
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sat 04 Apr 2009 06:52:24a, Jean B. told us...
    >
    >> Mr. Bill wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 04 Apr 2009 08:27:05 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> It's amusing, isn't it? Of course, such phones don't work well when
    >>>> one is instructed to press certain buttons.
    >>> And kids today have never seen a phone number like IV-8-2450. The
    >>> I-V was for the Ivanhoe exchange in Lansing MI. Our familes home
    >>> number before area codes were even contemplated.
    >>>

    >> Ah yes. I am still well aware of the word prefix for our phone
    >> number.
    >>

    >
    > I remember converting from letter prefixes to numbers. It was briefly
    > frustrating. There were some odd coincidences with the letters, too. In
    > Ohio, our home number was in the TUxedo exchange, whereas my dad's ofice was
    > in the UTah exchange, so both began 88...
    >
    > Lest we never forget the movie title, BUtterfield 8.
    >

    LOL! I'd give my old exchange, but it is still my numerical
    exchange. Maybe soon...

    --
    Jean B.

  20. #20
    Cuthbert Thistlethwaite Guest

    Default Re: Heck we still have one of these mixmasters




    [email protected] wrote:



    > Well, apparently somebody at Sunbeam got a clue because they
    > now have a Mixmaster "Heritage" model that is metal bodied
    > and styled more like the old ones. I have read some good
    > reviews, and I'm tempted, but have not gotten one yet.


    > If anyone else has, or gets one, please let RFC know how it
    > works.


    My suggestions, since you're asking:

    Take a close look at a new one and you will find that it is made in
    china, and that there is nothing metallic about the crappy chrome-like
    plastic housing.

    You will be far better off hunting in antique shops for a real
    mixmaster.

    Familiarize yourself with the brand by looking at sites like
    http://decodan.com/ then go shopping.

    Even a single drop of light machine oil in the oil holes will loosen up
    a good unit, right in the store.

    I have a 1957 model and it runs like s sewing machine.

    HTH

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