Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: ham on gas grill

  1. #1
    Phyllis Stone Guest

    Default ham on gas grill

    my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Phyllis Stone wrote:
    > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I
    > was thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral
    > sliced and about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple
    > of burners and put the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and
    > should I wrap it in foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so
    > this is for her but I am sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions
    > would be appreciated.


    Put the ham on a rack in a pan. Tent it with foil as you would in an oven.
    Set the burners so that you can heat the ham via indirect heat.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  3. #3
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    On Nov 23, 6:48*pm, "Phyllis Stone" <nob...@msn.com> wrote:
    > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    > thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    > about 8 lbs. * google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    > the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    > have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    > others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    ================================
    Phyllis,

    I am by no means a "gifted griller" but I'd bet my right foot (the one
    with the neuropathy!) that this would work:

    The ham is already cooked. All it needs is heating. Be extremely
    careful of using the gas grill - you don't want to dry it out! I'm
    torn between the grill and the microwave. If you put it on the grill
    to glaze the outside and add some smoky taste, you run the risk of
    really drying it out before it gets hot enough in the center. If you
    do it in the microwave, it will kind of steam and not give you that
    nice glaze. You COULD nuke it till it's 140+ degrees and then
    transfer it to the grill just long enough to brush on a glaze and make
    it "sparkle".

    Whaddya think folks?
    Lynn in Fargo

  4. #4
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill


    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Nov 23, 6:48 pm, "Phyllis Stone" <nob...@msn.com> wrote:
    > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    > thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    > about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    > the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    > have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    > others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    ================================
    Phyllis,

    I am by no means a "gifted griller" but I'd bet my right foot (the one
    with the neuropathy!) that this would work:

    The ham is already cooked. All it needs is heating. Be extremely
    careful of using the gas grill - you don't want to dry it out! I'm
    torn between the grill and the microwave. If you put it on the grill
    to glaze the outside and add some smoky taste, you run the risk of
    really drying it out before it gets hot enough in the center. If you
    do it in the microwave, it will kind of steam and not give you that
    nice glaze. You COULD nuke it till it's 140+ degrees and then
    transfer it to the grill just long enough to brush on a glaze and make
    it "sparkle".

    Whaddya think folks?
    Lynn in Fargo
    >
    >

    A precooked ham should only be warmed to the eating temperature, 115F or so.
    This is especially true for a spiral sliced ham.

    Kent






  5. #5
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Kent wrote:

    > A precooked ham should only be warmed to the eating temperature, 115F
    > or so. This is especially true for a spiral sliced ham.


    Care to provide a cite? Re-warming to 140F is what is recommended. It
    doesn't take much more time to do that then to go to 115.
    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  6. #6
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill


    "Phyllis Stone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    > thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    > about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and
    > put the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in
    > foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am
    > sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    >

    Wrap the ham in heavy duty foil. Heat indirectly at a very low "oven"
    temperature, only to "eating temperature", 115F or so . Use one end burner,
    and place the wrapped ham on the far side of the grill. You might turn the
    ham 180 degrees halfway through the heating process. Use an oven thermometer
    on the grate next to the ham and adjust your heating temp. to 300F or so.
    Spiral sliced hams dry out if overheated, especially the second time you try
    to heat them up. The less you heat the first time the better.

    Kent







  7. #7
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    On Nov 23, 7:09*pm, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Lynn from Fargo" <lynng...@i29.net> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]..
    > On Nov 23, 6:48 pm, "Phyllis Stone" <nob...@msn.com> wrote:> my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    > > thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    > > about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    > > the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    > > have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    > > others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    >
    > ================================
    > Phyllis,
    >
    > I am by no means a "gifted griller" but I'd bet my right foot (the one
    > with the neuropathy!) that this would work:
    >
    > The ham is already cooked. *All it needs is heating. *Be extremely
    > careful of using the gas grill - you don't want to dry it out! *I'm
    > torn between the grill and the microwave. *If you put it on the grill
    > to glaze the outside and add some smoky taste, you run the risk of
    > really drying it out before it gets hot enough in the center. If you
    > do it in the microwave, it will kind of steam and not give you that
    > nice glaze. *You COULD nuke it till it's 140+ degrees and then
    > transfer it to the grill just long enough to brush on a glaze and make
    > it "sparkle".
    >
    > Whaddya think folks?
    > Lynn in Fargo
    >
    > A precooked ham should only be warmed to the eating temperature, 115F or so.
    > This is especially true for a spiral sliced ham.
    >
    > Kent


    Thanks, Kent!
    Lynn

  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    On Mon 23 Nov 2009 05:48:06p, Phyllis Stone told us...

    > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I
    > was thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced
    > and about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners
    > and put the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it
    > in foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but
    > I am sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


    I'm assuming that your spiral-slized ham is pre-cooked as well as already
    glazed. Wrapping it in foil will probably cause the glaze to liquify, so
    IMHO, I wouldn't wrap it.

    You really only need to reheat the ham. Depending on the number burners on
    your grill, I would only turn on one or two and watch the temperature to
    keep it at no more than 300 or less. Indirect heating is correct, and put
    a pan under the ham to collect the drippings.

    HTH

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  9. #9
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill


    "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > Kent wrote:
    >
    >> A precooked ham should only be warmed to the eating temperature, 115F
    >> or so. This is especially true for a spiral sliced ham.

    >
    > Care to provide a cite? Re-warming to 140F is what is recommended. It
    > doesn't take much more time to do that then to go to 115.
    > --
    > Dave
    > What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    > you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan
    >

    Heating to 140F dries the ham out more. It doesn't create any problem for
    the first dinner at all, but you don't gain anything. When you heat the
    spiral sliced ham a second time the slices are drier and separate. This gets
    more pronounced each time you warm up. You minimize that by heating up as
    minimally as you can.

    Kent





  10. #10
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Phyllis Stone wrote:
    > > my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I
    > > was thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral
    > > sliced and about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple
    > > of burners and put the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and
    > > should I wrap it in foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so
    > > this is for her but I am sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions
    > > would be appreciated.

    >
    > Put the ham on a rack in a pan. Tent it with foil as you would in an oven.
    > Set the burners so that you can heat the ham via indirect heat.


    Or... Or! I'm incapable of arguing with you on anything to do with
    barbecue or grills so you win, but since it's a spiral sliced ham, it's
    essentially a spiral sliced ham steak. If she cut what she thought
    appropriate off of the bone, she could cook slices of it as ham steak
    for her granddaughter directly on the grill or fried. Then she could
    cook what's left within a few days as a unit any way she wants.
    For her granddaughter, I'd slice the whole damned thing along the bone
    on the meaty side before cooking for half steaks and ham bits to start
    with. I'd select what I needed for Thanksgiving. Then I'd figure out
    what I wanted to do with the rest. 2 cents and never tried, but I'll
    stand by it. It'll certainly work.

    leo

  11. #11
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Lynn from Fargo <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The ham is already cooked. All it needs is heating. Be extremely
    >careful of using the gas grill - you don't want to dry it out! I'm
    >torn between the grill and the microwave. If you put it on the grill
    >to glaze the outside and add some smoky taste, you run the risk of
    >really drying it out before it gets hot enough in the center. If you
    >do it in the microwave, it will kind of steam and not give you that
    >nice glaze. You COULD nuke it till it's 140+ degrees and then
    >transfer it to the grill just long enough to brush on a glaze and make
    >it "sparkle".


    >Whaddya think folks?


    I vote for gas grill, in a pan with 3/4" or so of water, then
    tented with foil. If there's enough room to do all that.

    And if the gas grill is too hot, just turn off the
    burners for a while and turn them back on later. You really
    just need to heat the ham to about 150 degrees F.

    Steve

  12. #12
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Kent wrote:
    > "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] ...
    >> Kent wrote:
    >>
    >>> A precooked ham should only be warmed to the eating temperature,
    >>> 115F or so. This is especially true for a spiral sliced ham.

    >>
    >> Care to provide a cite? Re-warming to 140F is what is recommended. It
    >> doesn't take much more time to do that then to go to 115.
    >> --
    >> Dave
    >> What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven
    >> before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan
    >>

    > Heating to 140F dries the ham out more.


    Not really. Drying is as much from air movement as it is with heat. Using
    foil to tent the ham reduces exposure of the meat to air movement.

    > It doesn't create any problem


    Yes, I know. I've done literally several hundred.

    > for the first dinner at all, but you don't gain anything.


    115F ham is lukewarm, and cools off quickly.

    > When you
    > heat the spiral sliced ham a second time the slices are drier and
    > separate. This gets more pronounced each time you warm up. You
    > minimize that by heating up as minimally as you can.


    Depends on technique. A bare-assed ham sitting on a grill might. I've never
    had that happen with a ham on a rack in a pan, covered in foil.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  13. #13
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:48:06 -0600, "Phyllis Stone" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    >thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    >about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    >the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    >have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    >others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


    I think you're complicating things.

    You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of hams
    need to be heated all the way through to like 150F.

    After the turkey is done and resting put the ham back in the oven to
    reWARM (doesn't need to be hot). If only for your grand daughter
    simply rewarm just enough for her... wrap a few slices in saran and
    nuke a couple minutes on low, or bury a few slices under some dressing
    to warm. Actually once it's been cooked through there is no reason to
    rewarm, it can be eaten cold if one chooses... I made one of these two
    weeks ago and for the next five days had cold ham on rye, etc... then
    what was left is now in my freezer waiting to become soup. I never
    use the glaze, it's messy, it messes with the flavor of soups, and my
    cats con't like glaze. Don't complicate things.
    http://cooksham.com/cooking/spiral-sliced-ham


  14. #14
    itsjoannotjoann Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    On Nov 23, 8:28*pm, brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:48:06 -0600, "Phyllis Stone" <nob...@msn.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    > >thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    > >about 8 lbs. * google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and put
    > >the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil?I
    > >have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    > >others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    >
    > I think you're complicating things.
    >
    > You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    > fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    > well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of hams
    > need to be heated all the way through to like 150F. *
    >
    > After the turkey is done and resting put the ham back in the oven to
    > reWARM (doesn't need to be hot). *If only for your grand daughter
    > simply rewarm just enough for her... wrap a few slices in saran and
    > nuke a couple minutes on low, or bury a few slices under some dressing
    > to warm. *Actually once it's been cooked through there is no reason to
    > rewarm, it can be eaten cold if one chooses... I made one of these two
    > weeks ago and for the next five days had cold ham on rye, etc... then
    > what was left is now in my freezer waiting to become soup. * I never
    > use the glaze, it's messy, it messes with the flavor of soups, and my
    > cats con't like glaze. *Don't complicate things.http://cooksham.com/cooking/spiral-sliced-ham


    >
    >

    I agree with Sheldon, just cook the darn thing the day before. Serve
    it cold and if she wants her slice 'warm' slap it in the microwave
    several seconds. Cooking this piggy in a crockpot is another option
    if you don't want to fool with the gas grill.

  15. #15
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > I think you're complicating things.
    >
    > You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    > fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    > well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of hams
    > need to be heated all the way through to like 150F.
    >
    > After the turkey is done and resting put the ham back in the oven to
    > reWARM (doesn't need to be hot). If only for your grand daughter
    > simply rewarm just enough for her... wrap a few slices in saran and
    > nuke a couple minutes on low, or bury a few slices under some dressing
    > to warm. Actually once it's been cooked through there is no reason to
    > rewarm, it can be eaten cold if one chooses... I made one of these two
    > weeks ago and for the next five days had cold ham on rye, etc... then
    > what was left is now in my freezer waiting to become soup. I never
    > use the glaze, it's messy, it messes with the flavor of soups, and my
    > cats con't like glaze. Don't complicate things.
    > http://cooksham.com/cooking/spiral-sliced-ham


    You make some good points, Sheldon.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  16. #16
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

    > it's essentially a spiral sliced ham steak. If she cut what she
    > thought appropriate off of the bone, she could cook slices of it as
    > ham steak for her granddaughter directly on the grill or fried. Then
    > she could cook what's left within a few days as a unit any way she
    > wants.
    > For her granddaughter, I'd slice the whole damned thing along the bone
    > on the meaty side before cooking for half steaks and ham bits to start
    > with. I'd select what I needed for Thanksgiving. Then I'd figure out
    > what I wanted to do with the rest. 2 cents and never tried, but I'll
    > stand by it. It'll certainly work.


    Sounds good and makes sense, Leonard.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  17. #17
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:48:06 -0600, "Phyllis Stone" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and I was
    >>thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral sliced and
    >>about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a couple of burners and
    >>put
    >>the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in foil? I
    >>have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her but I am sure
    >>others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    >
    > I think you're complicating things.
    >
    > You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    > fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    > well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of hams
    > need to be heated all the way through to like 150F.
    >

    Almost all packaged hams are precooked and can be eaten without heating when
    you bring them home from the market. All spiral sliced hams have been
    precooked.

    Kent





  18. #18
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    Kent wrote:
    > "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:48:06 -0600, "Phyllis Stone" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and
    >>> I was thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral
    >>> sliced and about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a
    >>> couple of burners and put
    >>> the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in
    >>> foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her
    >>> but I am sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be
    >>> appreciated.

    >>
    >> I think you're complicating things.
    >>
    >> You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    >> fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    >> well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of
    >> hams need to be heated all the way through to like 150F.
    >>

    > Almost all packaged hams are precooked and can be eaten without
    > heating when you bring them home from the market. All spiral sliced
    > hams have been precooked.


    Pre-cooking isn't the issue. It is the potential growth of pathogens due to
    factors mentioned by Sheldon, among others.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  19. #19
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill

    "Dave Bugg" wrote:
    >Kent wrote:
    >> "brooklyn1" wrote:
    >>> "Phyllis Stone" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> my oven is too small for both a ham and turkey at the same time and
    >>>> I was thinking of putting the ham on the gas grill. It is a spiral
    >>>> sliced and about 8 lbs. google said that I should turn on a
    >>>> couple of burners and put
    >>>> the ham on indirect. Does that sound right and should I wrap it in
    >>>> foil? I have a granddaughter who hates turkey, so this is for her
    >>>> but I am sure others will eat it too. Any suggestions would be
    >>>> appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> I think you're complicating things.
    >>>
    >>> You can cook your ham first, even the day before and keep it in the
    >>> fridge... for food safety, because you have no way of knowing how
    >>> well it was refrigerated before you brought it home these type of
    >>> hams need to be heated all the way through to like 150F.
    >>>

    >> Almost all packaged hams are precooked and can be eaten without
    >> heating when you bring them home from the market. All spiral sliced
    >> hams have been precooked.

    >
    >Pre-cooking isn't the issue. It is the potential growth of pathogens due to
    >factors mentioned by Sheldon, among others.


    Kent is just demonstrating his usual kitchen incompetency and inane
    know-nothing bluster.

    These hams need to be heated through to a safe temperature for the
    same reason it's important to heat tube steaks fully all the way
    through... all these cured/smoked refrigerated meat products are
    walking time bombs, even when properly heated they can still wreak
    havoc because many stores do not properly cool these products...
    canned hams can be especially dangerous. Only ham I know to be safe
    unheated is SPAM. This improper refrigeration food safety issue is
    why I don't serve these meat products to guests and because they're
    typically not heated properly, many are afflicted with KFIS (Kent Food
    Ignornace Syndrome) I don't eat them when served by others. Folks
    tend to pig out on smoked ham (no pun intended) and so often due to
    volume consumed become quite ill even when these products are only
    minimally tainted. Anyone serving smoked ham it's better to be safe
    than sorry, it's better to slightly over cook and have the ham dry
    around the edges than to find out the next day how your guests were
    praying to their commode all night.

    The only ham I serve for holiday meals is a fresh ham, the
    King of meat cuts... cured ham is preserved ham, the trailer trash of
    meat cuts. I'll cook a smoked ham once, perhaps twice a year because
    occasionally I get a pregnant urge for ham sammiches, and come winter
    I enjoy good homemade bean and pea soups. And I don't care that many
    imported cured hams are ridiculously expensive, even prosciutto is
    mostly salty fat, as far as I'm concerned a stick of pepperoni is far
    more gourmet... Slim Jims are more enjoyable eating than Parma ham...
    SPAM is tastier.

  20. #20
    Phyllis Stone Guest

    Default Re: ham on gas grill


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > These hams need to be heated through to a safe temperature for the
    > same reason it's important to heat tube steaks fully all the way
    > through... all these cured/smoked refrigerated meat products are
    > walking time bombs, even when properly heated they can still wreak
    > havoc because many stores do not properly cool these products...
    > canned hams can be especially dangerous. Only ham I know to be safe
    > unheated is SPAM. This improper refrigeration food safety issue is
    > why I don't serve these meat products to guests and because they're
    > typically not heated properly, many are afflicted with KFIS (Kent Food
    > Ignornace Syndrome) I don't eat them when served by others. Folks
    > tend to pig out on smoked ham (no pun intended) and so often due to
    > volume consumed become quite ill even when these products are only
    > minimally tainted. Anyone serving smoked ham it's better to be safe
    > than sorry, it's better to slightly over cook and have the ham dry
    > around the edges than to find out the next day how your guests were
    > praying to their commode all night.



    What if I do like you said and cook the ham in the oven the day before, put
    it in the refrigerator, and the next day put a glaze on it and heat it up ,
    slice it and put some slices on a platter? I got a Cross & Blackwell
    cherry glaze in case my English son in law wants ham. If I wrap it real good
    in foil when I am baking it maybe it won't dry out.
    ..



Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32