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Thread: hachis parmentier

  1. #1
    lainie Guest

    Default hachis parmentier

    Thank you to whoever posted this link -
    http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co...cipePacket.pdf

    I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    instead of a half. Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    Well worth the effort. A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. Not
    happening. My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. This works well. But when
    I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. Bummer.
    Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    delicious. Now on to my next challenge..........e.

  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. *Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. *A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. *Not
    > happening. *My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. *This works well. *But when
    > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. *Bummer.
    > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > delicious. *Now on to my next challenge..........e.


    I could copy and paste...here it is.

    for the beef and bouillon
    1 pound cube steak or chuck
    (see above), cut into small
    pieces
    1 small onion, sliced
    1 small carrot, trimmed,
    peeled, and cut into 1-inchlong
    pieces
    1 small celery stalk, trimmed
    and cut into 1-inch-long
    pieces
    2 garlic cloves, smashed
    and peeled
    2 parsley sprigs
    1 bay leaf
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon black peppercorns
    6 cups water
    ½ beef bouillon cube (optional)
    f o r t h e f i l l i n g
    1½ tablespoons olive oil
    ½ pound sausage, sweet or
    spicy, removed from casings
    if necessary
    1 teaspoon tomato paste
    Salt and freshly ground pepper
    f o r t h e t o p p i n g
    2 pounds Idaho (russet) potatoes,
    peeled and quartered
    ½ cup whole milk
    ¼ cup heavy cream
    3 tablespoons unsalted butter,
    at room temperature, plus 1
    tablespoon butter, cut into bits
    Salt and freshly ground pepper
    ½ cup grated Gruyère, Comté,
    or Emmental cheese
    2 tablespoons freshly grated
    Parmesan (optional)

    Directions:

    t o ma k e t h e b e e f : Put all the ingredients except the bouillon
    cube in a
    Dutch oven or soup pot and bring to a boil, skimming off the foam and
    solids
    that bubble to the surface. Lower the heat and simmer gently for 1½
    hours.
    The broth will have a mild flavor and that’s fine for this dish, but
    if you want
    to pump it up, you can stir in the half bouillon cube — taste the
    broth at the
    midway point and decide.
    Drain the meat and strain and reserve the broth. Transfer the beef to
    a cutting
    board, and discard the vegetables or, if you think they’ve still got
    some flavor
    to spare, hold on to them for the filling. Traditionally hachis
    Parmentier is
    vegetableless, but that shouldn’t stop you from salvaging and using
    the carrots.
    (The beef and bouillon can be made up to 1 day ahead, covered, and
    refrigerated.)
    Using a chef’s knife, chop the beef into tiny pieces. You could do
    this in a food
    processor, but the texture of your hachis Parmentier will be more
    interesting if
    you chop by hand, an easy and quick job.
    t o ma k e t h e f i l l i n g : Butter a 2-quart oven-going casserole
    — a Pyrex deepdish
    pie plate is just the right size for this.
    Put a large skillet over medium heat and pour in the olive oil. When
    it’s hot,
    add the sausage and cook, breaking up the clumps of meat, until the
    sausage is
    just pink. Add the chopped beef and tomato paste and stir to mix
    everything
    well. Stir in 1 cup of the bouillon and bring to a boil. You want to
    have just enough
    bouillon in the pan to moisten the filling and to bubble up gently
    wherever
    there’s a little room; if you think you need more (a smidgen more is
    better
    than too little), add it now. Season with salt and pepper, especially
    pepper. (If
    you’ve kept any of the vegetables from the bouillon, cut them into
    small cubes
    and stir them into the filling before you put the filling in the
    casserole.) Scrape
    the filling into the casserole and cover it lightly; set aside while
    you prepare the
    potatoes. (You can make the dish to this point up to a few hours
    ahead; cover the casserole with
    foil and refrigerate.)
    t o ma k e t h e t o p p i n g : Have ready a potato ricer or food
    mill (first choices),
    a masher, or a fork.
    Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted cold water and
    bring to a
    boil. Cook until the potatoes are tender enough to be pierced easily
    with the tip
    of a knife, about 20 minutes; drain them well.
    Meanwhile, center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400
    degrees
    F. Line a baking sheet with foil or a silicone baking mat (you’ll use
    it as drip
    catcher).
    Warm the milk and cream.
    Run the potatoes through the ricer or food mill into a bowl, or mash
    them
    well. Using a wooden spoon or a sturdy spatula, stir in the milk and
    cream, then
    blend in the 3 tablespoon butter. Season to taste with salt and
    pepper.
    Spoon the potatoes over the filling, spreading them evenly and making
    sure
    they reach to the edges of the casserole. Sprinkle the grated Gruyère
    over the
    top of the pie, dust with the Parmesan (if using), and scatter over
    the bits of
    butter. Place the dish on the lined baking sheet.
    Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling steadily and the
    potatoes
    have developed a golden brown crust (the best part). Serve.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. *Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. *A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. *Not
    > happening. *My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. *This works well. *But when
    > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. *Bummer.
    > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > delicious. *Now on to my next challenge..........e.


    Oh no!!! Nothing worse than droppig a wonderful dish like that!!!

    Here, I copied it for you.



    Hachis Parmentier


    f o r t h e b e e f a n d b o u i l l o n

    1 pound cube steak or chuck cut into small pieces
    1 small onion, sliced
    1 small carrot, trimmed,peeled, and cut into 1-inchlong pieces
    1 small celery stalk, trimmedand cut into 1-inch-long pieces
    2 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
    2 parsley sprigs
    1 bay leaf
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon black peppercorns
    6 cups water
    ½ beef bouillon cube (optional)

    f o r t h e f i l l i n g

    1½ tablespoons olive oil
    ½ pound sausage, sweet or spicy, removed from casings if necessary
    1 teaspoon tomato paste
    Salt and freshly ground pepper

    f o r t h e t o p p i n g

    2 pounds Idaho (russet) potatoes, peeled and quartered
    ½ cup whole milk
    ¼ cup heavy cream
    3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus 1tablespoon
    butter, cut into bits
    Salt and freshly ground pepper
    ½ cup grated Gruyère, Comté,
    or Emmental cheese
    2 tablespoons freshly grated
    Parmesan (optional)

    t o ma k e t h e b e e f :

    Put all the ingredients except the bouillon cube in a Dutch oven or
    soup pot and bring to a boil,

    skimming off the foam and solids that bubble to the surface. Lower the
    heat and simmer gently

    for 1½ hours. The broth will have a mild flavor and that’s fine for
    this dish, but if you want to pump

    it up, you can stir in the half bouillon cube — taste the broth at the
    midway point and decide.

    Drain the meat and strain and reserve the broth. Transfer the beef to
    a cutting board, and

    discard the vegetables or, if you think they’ve still got some flavor
    to spare, hold on to them for

    the filling. Traditionally hachis Parmentier is vegetableless, but
    that shouldn’t stop you from

    salvaging and using the carrots.

    (The beef and bouillon can be made up to 1 day ahead, covered, and
    refrigerated.)

    Using a chef’s knife, chop the beef into tiny pieces. You could do
    this in a food processor, but

    the texture of your hachis Parmentier will be more interesting if you
    chop by hand, an easy and

    quick job.

    t o ma k e t h e f i l l i n g :

    Butter a 2-quart oven-going casserole — a Pyrex deepdish pie plate is
    just the right size for this.

    Put a large skillet over medium heat and pour in the olive oil. When
    it’s hot, add the sausage

    and cook, breaking up the clumps of meat, until the sausage is just
    pink. Add the chopped beef

    and tomato paste and stir to mix everything well. Stir in 1 cup of the
    bouillon and bring to a boil.

    You want to have just enough bouillon in the pan to moisten the
    filling and to bubble up gently

    wherever there’s a little room; if you think you need more (a smidgen
    more is better than too

    little), add it now.

    Season with salt and pepper, especially pepper. (If you’ve kept any
    of the vegetables from the

    bouillon, cut them into small cubes and stir them into the filling
    before you put the filling in the

    casserole.) Scrape the filling into the casserole and cover it
    lightly; set aside while you prepare

    the potatoes. (You can make the dish to this point up to a few hours
    ahead; cover the casserole

    with foil and refrigerate.)

    t o ma k e t h e t o p p i n g :
    Have ready a potato ricer or food mill (first choices), a masher, or
    a fork.
    Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted cold water and
    bring to a boil. Cook until the

    potatoes are tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a
    knife, about 20 minutes; drain

    them well.

    Meanwhile, center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400
    degreesF. Line a baking

    sheet with foil or a silicone baking mat (you’ll use it as drip
    catcher).

    Warm the milk and cream.
    Run the potatoes through the ricer or food mill into a bowl, or mash
    them well. Using a wooden

    spoon or a sturdy spatula, stir in the milk and cream, then blend in
    the 3 tablespoon butter.

    Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Spoon the potatoes over the filling, spreading them evenly and making
    sure they reach to the

    edges of the casserole. Sprinkle the grated Gruyère over the top of
    the pie, dust with the

    Parmesan (if using), and scatter over the bits of butter. Place the
    dish on the lined baking sheet.
    Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling steadily and the
    potatoes have developed a

    golden brown crust (the best part). Serve.

    b o n n e i d é e

    Quick Hachis Parmentier.

    You can make a very good hachis Parmentier using ground beef and
    storebought beef broth.

    Use 1 pound ground beef instead of the steak, and when you add it to
    the sausage in the
    skillet, think about adding some finely chopped fresh parsley and
    maybe a little
    minced fresh thyme.

    You could also sauté 1 or 2 minced garlic cloves in the olive oil
    before the sausage goes into

    the skillet. (The herbs and garlic help mimic the aromatics in the
    bouillon.) Moisten the filling with

    the broth, and you’re good to go.
    m a k e s 4
    g e n e r o u s
    s e r v i n g s
    s e r v i n g

    Bring the hachis Parmentier to the table and spoon out portions there.
    The dish needs nothing more than a green salad to make it a full and
    very satisfying meal.

    s t o r i n g

    It’s easy to make this dish in stages: the beef and bouillon can be
    made up to a day ahead and

    kept covered in the refrigerator, and the filling can be prepared a
    few hours ahead and kept

    covered in the fridge. You can even assemble the entire pie ahead and
    keep it chilled for a few

    hours before baking it (directly from the refrigerator if your
    casserole can stand the temperature

    change) — of course, you’ll have to bake it a little longer.

    If you’ve got leftovers, you can reheat them in a 350-degree-F oven.



  4. #4
    JL Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier



    lainie wrote:
    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -
    > http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co...cipePacket.pdf
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. Not
    > happening. My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. This works well. But when
    > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. Bummer.
    > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > delicious. Now on to my next challenge..........e.


    Here's the Escoffier version:

    Hachis Parmentier

    Bake some nicely shaped floury potatoes in the oven. As soon as cooked
    cut off the top quarter of the potatoes and remove the insides with a
    spoon taking care to leave the empty shells whole.

    Mash the potato pulp with a for, then shallow fry it in butter, turning
    over and over frequently until the mixture becomes lightly browned. Add
    and equal amount of meat cut in small dice, 2 & 1/2 ounce of chopped
    onion cooked in a little butter per 2 & 1/4 lb. of the total mixture, a
    good pinch of chopped parsley and a few drops of vinegar. Carry on
    cooking the mixture for a few more minutes as before then fill into the
    empty potato shells.

    Coat the surface again nd again with a little Sauce Lyonnaise which has
    been rubbed through a fine sieve, allowing the mixture to abosrb as
    much of the sauce as it can. Replaace the tops of the potatoes, place
    on a tray and reheat in the oven for 10 minutes. As soon as they are
    removed from the oven, arrange on a suitable dish on a serviette.


    While i like a number of Escoffiers stuffed potatoes receipes,
    particularly his pommes de terre menagere and his filets de sole Olga
    where in the baked potatoe shells are filled with cooked sole, prawns
    and sauce a vin blanc then toped with a bit of morney sauce heres is
    Escoffiers Hachis Gran'mere.

    Mix the finley diced meat with a third of its volume of light mashed
    potatoes; place into a buttered earthenware dish and smooth the surface
    flat. Cover with a thin layer of mashed potatoe, sprinklw well with
    grated cheese miexed with dry whtie breadcrumbs and sprinkle this with
    melted butter. Graatinate in a hot oven.

    On removing from the oven surrond the Hachis with quraters of hot,
    freshly hard boiled eggs.

    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  5. #5
    lainie Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Oct 28, 4:58*pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    > On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Thank you to whoever posted this link -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...

    >
    > > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > > instead of a half. *Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup..
    > > Well worth the effort. *A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. *Not
    > > happening. *My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. *This works well. *But when
    > > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. *Bummer.
    > > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > > delicious. *Now on to my next challenge..........e.

    >
    > I could copy and paste...here it is.
    >


    Hmm, thanks. Could you tidy it up a bit e.

  6. #6
    JL Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier



    lainie wrote:
    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -
    >

    http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co...cipePacket.pdf
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. Not
    > happening. My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. This works well. But when
    > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. Bummer.
    > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > delicious. Now on to my next challenge..........e.


    Here's the Escoffier version:

    Hachis Parmentier

    Bake some nicely shaped floury potatoes in the oven. As soon as cooked
    cut off the top quarter of the potatoes and remove the insides with a
    spoon taking care to leave the empty shells whole.

    Mash the potato pulp with a for, then shallow fry it in butter, turning
    over and over frequently until the mixture becomes lightly browned. Add
    and equal amount of meat cut in small dice, 2 & 1/2 ounce of chopped
    onion cooked in a little butter per 2 & 1/4 lb. of the total mixture, a
    good pinch of chopped parsley and a few drops of vinegar. Carry on
    cooking the mixture for a few more minutes as before then fill into the
    empty potato shells.

    Coat the surface again and again with a little Sauce Lyonnaise which has
    been rubbed through a fine sieve, allowing the mixture to absorb as
    much of the sauce as it can. Replace the tops of the potatoes, place
    on a tray and reheat in the oven for 10 minutes. As soon as they are
    removed from the oven, arrange on a suitable dish on a serviette.


    While i like a number of Escoffier's stuffed potatoes recipes,
    particularly his pommes de terre menagere and his filets de sole Olga
    where in the baked potato shells are filled with cooked sole, prawns
    and sauce a vin blanc then toped with a bit of morney sauce here is
    Escoffiers Hachis Gran'mere.

    Mix the finely diced meat with a third of its volume of light mashed
    potatoes; place into a buttered earthenware dish and smooth the surface
    flat. Cover with a thin layer of mashed potato, sprinkle well with
    grated cheese mixed with dry white bread crumbs and sprinkle this with
    melted butter. Gratinate in a hot oven.

    On removing from the oven surround the Hachis with quarters of hot,
    freshly hard boiled eggs.

    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2010 13:42:29 -0700 (PDT), lainie <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -
    > http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co...cipePacket.pdf
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. Not
    > happening. My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. This works well. But when
    > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. Bummer.
    > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > delicious. Now on to my next challenge..........e.



    You can do it. Highlight, right click, select copy... switch to Word,
    right click, select paste, clear formatting (if you wish) and
    reformat.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  8. #8
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Oct 28, 2:32*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 28, 4:58*pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > Thank you to whoever posted this link -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...

    >
    > > > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > > > instead of a half. *Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > > > Well worth the effort. *A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > > > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book. *Not
    > > > happening. *My three daughters are all nursing, and it's hard to find
    > > > an appropriate recipe without gassy stuff. *This works well. *Butwhen
    > > > I put some aside for me to freeze, and tried to wrap an elastic band
    > > > around the dish, it snapped and crashed to the floor. *Bummer.
    > > > Managed to taste what wasn't right on the floor though, and it was
    > > > delicious. *Now on to my next challenge..........e.

    >
    > > I could copy and paste...here it is.

    >
    > Hmm, thanks. *Could you tidy it up a bit *e.


    hmmmmmmm....that's about as tidy as it's gonna get. :-)

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    lainie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co.../FFwD.RecipePa
    > cket.pdf


    You can't cut from a website but you can usually copy ‹ and paste. It
    worked fine for me. HTH.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    A few pics from the Fair are here:
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254

  10. #10
    lainie Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Oct 28, 5:19*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Thank you to whoever posted this link -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...

    >


    You made that look easy. Who knows why I couldn't do it!! e.

  11. #11
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    lainie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 28, 5:19*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Thank you to whoever posted this link
    > > > -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...

    > >

    >
    > You made that look easy. Who knows why I couldn't do it!! e.


    Perhaps your software is slightly older. I was going to post that you
    can't easily copy and paste from a .pdf document, but I tried it and it
    worked fine! I recently upgraded my Adobe Reader.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2010 13:42:29 -0700 (PDT), lainie wrote:

    > Thank you to whoever posted this link -
    > http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.co...cipePacket.pdf
    >
    > I followed the recipe to a "T", except added one bouillion cube
    > instead of a half. Also boiled and concentrated the stock to one cup.
    > Well worth the effort. A couple of downsides, I couldn't cut and
    > paste the recipe since apparently I have to buy her book.


    It's a PDF document. You have to select the "Text Tool" before you
    can cut/copy. It's the icon with the "T" inside it.

    -sw

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: hachis parmentier

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2010 17:40:19 -0700, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > lainie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Oct 28, 5:19*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>> On Oct 28, 1:42*pm, lainie <lainie...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > Thank you to whoever posted this link
    >>> > -http://www.frenchfridayswithdorie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FFwD...
    >>>

    >>
    >> You made that look easy. Who knows why I couldn't do it!! e.

    >
    > Perhaps your software is slightly older. I was going to post that you
    > can't easily copy and paste from a .pdf document, but I tried it and it
    > worked fine!


    ....If your Text Tool is active. I had to select it first before I
    used it. You can usually cut/copy anything in a PDF as long as it
    was created with the text features. You can insert a JPEG
    containing words and expect Adobe or Foxit to be be able to
    recognize it.

    I believe the Text Tool is sticky. It remembers it's last setting
    (on/off). I use FoxIt, but this was same behavior in Adobe.

    ObFood: I've been watching "Ancient Aliens" (History Channel).
    very good series. When these Aliens do return, they're going to
    have a lot of explaining to do, especially to the God-loving crowd.
    There's still a higher power, it's just not human as we currently
    know them). Isn't it kinda implied that He wasn't human anyway?

    Personally, I think all these UFO's flying around are just
    unemployed aliens with too much time on their hands. They probably
    built these spaceships in their garages and thought, "Heck, lets go
    **** with Earth today". And maybe pick up a Philly cheeseseak
    while they're at it.

    -sw

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