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Thread: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    I don't like posting untried recipes unless someone is looking for a
    specific recipe, which I happen to have. However, this one just looks
    soooo good to me that I thought I'd share it. I am not going to type up
    the supporting recipes right now, since I am thinking mainly of the
    major ingredients and the concept as a springboard, but if someone wants
    those recipes, I will provide them.

    Balti Persian Gosht (4)
    Source: Balti Curry Cookbook by Pat Chapman, pp. 54-55.

    4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    leftovers!]
    2-3 Tbsps ghee or corn oil
    3-6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    3-4 Tbsps Balti masala paste
    4 oz dried figs
    4 oz dates, stoned
    2 Tbsps pine kernels
    2 Tbsps shelled hazelnuts
    1 Tbsp clear honey
    about 7 oz reserved stock, Balti chicken stock, or water
    1 Tbsp Balti garam masala
    1 Tbsp very finely chopped cilantro
    aromatic salt to taste

    Spices:
    1 tsp cumin seeds, roasted
    1 tsp coriander seeds, roasted
    1 tsp paprika [sounds odd to me]
    1/2 tsp turmeric
    1/2 tsp mango powder

    Heat ghee in your karahi [pan] on high heat, and stir-fry the Spices for
    20 seconds, then add the garlic and continue to stir-fry for a further
    30 seconds.

    Add the onion on a reduced heat, and stir-fry for about 10 minutes,
    allowing the onion to become transluscent and begin to brown.

    Add the masala paste and the par-cooked meat. Raise the heat again and
    bring to a brisk sizzle, stir-frying as needed for about 5 minutes.

    Add the dried fruit [cut up?], pine kernels, nuts and honey, along with
    the stock or water, and simmer, stirring, on a lower heat for about 10
    minutes. [I am thinking I'd prefer this to have minimal sauce, more
    like an Asian stir-fry.]

    Test for tenderness. If more cooking is needed add stock or water as
    required. When as you like it, add garam masala, cilantro and aromatic
    salt to taste.

    Simmer for 15 minutes more, then serve.

    Jean B.

  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    > leftovers!]


    "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    -sw

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    > leftovers!]


    "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    -sw

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >> leftovers!]

    >
    > "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?
    >
    > -sw


    The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >> leftovers!]

    >
    > "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?
    >
    > -sw


    The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>> leftovers!]

    >>
    >> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >
    > The title of the recipe says it is lamb....


    Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    to those not familiar with the menus.

    It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    meat"?

    OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    here.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>> leftovers!]

    >>
    >> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >
    > The title of the recipe says it is lamb....


    Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    to those not familiar with the menus.

    It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    meat"?

    OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    here.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    On Thu, 15 May 2008 10:29:20 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>> leftovers!]
    >>>
    >>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >>
    >> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >
    >Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    >to those not familiar with the menus.
    >
    >It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    >meat"?
    >
    >OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    >here.


    "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.

    Gosht is usually goat meat in India.



  9. #9
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    On Thu, 15 May 2008 10:29:20 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>> leftovers!]
    >>>
    >>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >>
    >> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >
    >Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    >to those not familiar with the menus.
    >
    >It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    >meat"?
    >
    >OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    >here.


    "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.

    Gosht is usually goat meat in India.



  10. #10
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert wrote on Thu, 15 May 2008 10:57:37 -0700:

    > "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England
    > in the late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and
    > Punjabi cooking with the food cooked in a karai. The karai is
    > similar to a wok.


    Goat is served at one of my favorite Indian restaurants and I
    quite like goat curry. I'm told that many places outside India
    use lamb or mutton instead of goat.
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  11. #11
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert wrote on Thu, 15 May 2008 10:57:37 -0700:

    > "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England
    > in the late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and
    > Punjabi cooking with the food cooked in a karai. The karai is
    > similar to a wok.


    Goat is served at one of my favorite Indian restaurants and I
    quite like goat curry. I'm told that many places outside India
    use lamb or mutton instead of goat.
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  12. #12
    George Cebulka Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert Klute wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 May 2008 10:29:20 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>>> leftovers!]
    >>>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?
    >>> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >> Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    >> to those not familiar with the menus.
    >>
    >> It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    >> meat"?
    >>
    >> OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    >> here.

    >
    > "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    > late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    > the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.
    >
    > Gosht is usually goat meat in India.
    >
    >


    Balti Dishes

    Originally coming from the North-West mountaneous region of India, where
    the nomadic Pathani Tribe used the Baltisatan - Wok, to prepare & eat
    their uniquely flavoured meals. All Balti Dishes servered with Tandoori
    Roti.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht
    Definitions of Gosht on the Web:

    * A ghoust is a type of Pakistani or Indian curry dish made from lamb.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht

  13. #13
    George Cebulka Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert Klute wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 May 2008 10:29:20 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>>> leftovers!]
    >>>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?
    >>> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >> Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    >> to those not familiar with the menus.
    >>
    >> It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    >> meat"?
    >>
    >> OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    >> here.

    >
    > "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    > late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    > the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.
    >
    > Gosht is usually goat meat in India.
    >
    >


    Balti Dishes

    Originally coming from the North-West mountaneous region of India, where
    the nomadic Pathani Tribe used the Baltisatan - Wok, to prepare & eat
    their uniquely flavoured meals. All Balti Dishes servered with Tandoori
    Roti.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht
    Definitions of Gosht on the Web:

    * A ghoust is a type of Pakistani or Indian curry dish made from lamb.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht

  14. #14
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:24:55 -0400, George Cebulka <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Robert Klute wrote:

    :
    >>
    >> "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    >> late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    >> the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.
    >>
    >> Gosht is usually goat meat in India.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Balti Dishes
    >
    >Originally coming from the North-West mountaneous region of India, where
    >the nomadic Pathani Tribe used the Baltisatan - Wok, to prepare & eat
    >their uniquely flavoured meals. All Balti Dishes servered with Tandoori
    >Roti.


    Never heard of a baltisatan. There is a mountainous region in northern
    Pakistan that was once the kingdom of Baltistan. The pan 'Balti' dishes
    are cooked in a wok like pan called a karai or bati. Balti dishes have
    a reputation of being one pot affairs, which may be where the Hindi word
    for bucket - balti - comes from.

    Birmingham claims to be the birth place of what we know as Balti dishes,
    the existance of Baltistan, not withstanding. It certainly is the
    source of the recipes in Chapman's books.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balti_%28food%29


    As a hint, any cookbook that has chicken tikka masala in it is English
    Indian. An Indian Indian cookbook might have a recipe for Murgh
    Makhani.




    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht
    >Definitions of Gosht on the Web:
    >
    > * A ghoust is a type of Pakistani or Indian curry dish made from lamb.
    > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht


    Gosht means meat, or flesh, in Urdu. As beef and pork are not eaten in
    Hindu and Muslim communities, respectively, that basically leaves sheep
    and goat as the default source of meat - as opposed to fowl or fish -
    for meat dishes. Mutton and goat are generally not available in the US,
    so when Indian recipes are translated into English they will specify
    lamb as the meat to be used in 'gosht' recipes.

    In India anytime you do see a menu in English when it specifies a dish
    is made with 'mutton' you almost certainly will get goat and not mature
    sheep.

    If you wish to be specific about the type of gosht, or meat, then bakri
    is goat, memna is lamb, and bhera is mutton.

    The wikipedia entry should say ghoust, or ghost, is actually a northern
    Indian dish made from meat.


  15. #15
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:24:55 -0400, George Cebulka <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Robert Klute wrote:

    :
    >>
    >> "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    >> late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    >> the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.
    >>
    >> Gosht is usually goat meat in India.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Balti Dishes
    >
    >Originally coming from the North-West mountaneous region of India, where
    >the nomadic Pathani Tribe used the Baltisatan - Wok, to prepare & eat
    >their uniquely flavoured meals. All Balti Dishes servered with Tandoori
    >Roti.


    Never heard of a baltisatan. There is a mountainous region in northern
    Pakistan that was once the kingdom of Baltistan. The pan 'Balti' dishes
    are cooked in a wok like pan called a karai or bati. Balti dishes have
    a reputation of being one pot affairs, which may be where the Hindi word
    for bucket - balti - comes from.

    Birmingham claims to be the birth place of what we know as Balti dishes,
    the existance of Baltistan, not withstanding. It certainly is the
    source of the recipes in Chapman's books.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balti_%28food%29


    As a hint, any cookbook that has chicken tikka masala in it is English
    Indian. An Indian Indian cookbook might have a recipe for Murgh
    Makhani.




    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht
    >Definitions of Gosht on the Web:
    >
    > * A ghoust is a type of Pakistani or Indian curry dish made from lamb.
    > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosht


    Gosht means meat, or flesh, in Urdu. As beef and pork are not eaten in
    Hindu and Muslim communities, respectively, that basically leaves sheep
    and goat as the default source of meat - as opposed to fowl or fish -
    for meat dishes. Mutton and goat are generally not available in the US,
    so when Indian recipes are translated into English they will specify
    lamb as the meat to be used in 'gosht' recipes.

    In India anytime you do see a menu in English when it specifies a dish
    is made with 'mutton' you almost certainly will get goat and not mature
    sheep.

    If you wish to be specific about the type of gosht, or meat, then bakri
    is goat, memna is lamb, and bhera is mutton.

    The wikipedia entry should say ghoust, or ghost, is actually a northern
    Indian dish made from meat.


  16. #16
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert Klute <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    >late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    >the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.


    In my experience, Balti is also served in a wok-shaped
    metal serving dish. This is obviously not the same wok/karai
    it was cooked in, but is I suppose just for power of suggestion.

    Steve

  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert Klute <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    >late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    >the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.


    In my experience, Balti is also served in a wok-shaped
    metal serving dish. This is obviously not the same wok/karai
    it was cooked in, but is I suppose just for power of suggestion.

    Steve

  18. #18
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>> leftovers!]
    >>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >
    > Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    > to those not familiar with the menus.
    >
    > It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    > meat"?
    >
    > OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    > here.
    >
    > -sw


    Oh gee. I must just be so used to reading foreign cookbooks that I
    didn't notice. Anyway, I was referring the subject for the thread!

    --
    Jean B.

  19. #19
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>> leftovers!]
    >>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?

    >> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >
    > Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    > to those not familiar with the menus.
    >
    > It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    > meat"?
    >
    > OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    > here.
    >
    > -sw


    Oh gee. I must just be so used to reading foreign cookbooks that I
    didn't notice. Anyway, I was referring the subject for the thread!

    --
    Jean B.

  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: great-sounding Balti lamb recipe

    Robert Klute wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 May 2008 10:29:20 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> 4 portions par-cooked Balti meat [I am thinking one could even use
    >>>>> leftovers!]
    >>>> "Balti meat"? Is that the meat from Balti people?
    >>> The title of the recipe says it is lamb....

    >> Not really. It says 'Balti Persian Gosht' which could mean anything
    >> to those not familiar with the menus.
    >>
    >> It should say lamb. How many recipes do you see for "American
    >> meat"?
    >>
    >> OK, so it started out as a joke. But I don't think I'm being anal
    >> here.

    >
    > "Balti" is an 'Indian' style developed in Birmingham, England in the
    > late 70s or early 80s. It is based on Kashmiri and Punjabi cooking with
    > the food cooked in a karai. The karai is similar to a wok.
    >
    > Gosht is usually goat meat in India.
    >
    >

    Pat Chapman speaks of a Pakistani/Baltistani origin. BUT I sure didn't
    hear this term until relatively recently.

    --
    Jean B.

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