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Thread: Gravy question

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Gravy question

    When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hot or
    cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and cornstarch
    interchangeable for this? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On 20/11/2011 12:51 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hot or
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and cornstarch
    > interchangeable for this? Thanks.



    Use cold water. and make it runny because it will blend in faster and
    with less chance of turning lumpy. Flour is preferable to cornstarch,
    but needs a little longer to cook. Cornstarch tends to be glossy and can
    give a gelatinous result. My preferred thickener is Veloutine, a
    (caramel) darkened potato starch. It cooks as quickly as cornstarch to
    the desired thickness but without the glossy finish.

  3. #3
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    > hot or
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    > cornstarch
    > interchangeable for this? Thanks.


    I prefer a roux. When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.



  4. #4
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 12:51*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hot or
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and cornstarch
    > interchangeable for this? Thanks.


    I agree to start with cold water & flour, but make it thick at first,
    working out all the lumps into a paste, then add a little water and
    thin it out, again working all the lumps out, then add more water and
    stir til smooth, THEN add to whateve you are thickening. My Sweet
    Precious MIL taught me this and it never fails.

  5. #5
    M. JL Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    Dave Smith wrote:
    > On 20/11/2011 12:51 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you
    >> use hot or
    >> cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    >> cornstarch
    >> interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    >
    >
    > Use cold water. and make it runny because it will blend in faster and
    > with less chance of turning lumpy. Flour is preferable to cornstarch,
    > but needs a little longer to cook. Cornstarch tends to be glossy and can
    > give a gelatinous result. My preferred thickener is Veloutine, a
    > (caramel) darkened potato starch. It cooks as quickly as cornstarch to
    > the desired thickness but without the glossy finish.


    Give rice flour a try, not only does it blend better than wheat flour,
    but imo tastes better.
    --
    JL

  6. #6
    M. JL Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    Pico Rico wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >>When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    >>hot or
    >>cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    >>cornstarch
    >>interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    >
    > I prefer a roux. When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    > and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.
    >
    >

    Its really amazing what a little white wine added to that process adds
    to the turkey gravy.
    Deglaze the roasting pan with the white wine, then add roux.
    --
    JL

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 12:51:42 -0500, rfdjr1@o[email protected] wrote:

    > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hot or
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio?


    Thick is good, not library paste thick... more like Elmer's Glue thick
    2 parts water to 1 part flour is about right. I just put the flour &
    (cold) water into something with a tight fitting lid and shake it to
    combine the two. While you're cooking the gravy, add more water if it
    seems too thick or looks like it has separated. I always add a couple
    drops of Lea & Perrins too.

    > And are flour and cornstarch interchangeable for this? Thanks.


    They have different properties, but you'll have to Google for that
    information. Another thickener to consider is arrowroot.

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  8. #8
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 12:51:42 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hot or
    >cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and cornstarch
    >interchangeable for this? Thanks.



    Either flour or cornstarch can be used, but they give a little
    different result. I prefer cornstarch. I mix a heaping tablespoon in
    a cup of cold water so it is runny. Add the mix to the pot while
    stirring and bring to very hot, just starting to boil to thicken.

  9. #9
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 12:51:42 -0500, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    >>hot or
    >>cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    >>cornstarch
    >>interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    >
    > Either flour or cornstarch can be used, but they give a little
    > different result. I prefer cornstarch. I mix a heaping tablespoon in
    > a cup of cold water so it is runny. Add the mix to the pot while
    > stirring and bring to very hot, just starting to boil to thicken.


    I like to brown the flour first; dry; stovetop or oven. Can be done days
    before Turkey roasting day. Gives the gravy nice flavor and color. Polly


  10. #10
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 12:39*pm, "Pico Rico" <PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:
    ....
    > I prefer a roux. *When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    > and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.


    I agree, rouxs rock!! I use cornstarch though. Love me some roux made
    with BUTTER!!!

    MMMMMMMM!

    John Kuthe...

  11. #11
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 8:39*am, "Pico Rico" <PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:
    > <rfd...@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    > > hot or
    > > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    > > cornstarch
    > > interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    > I prefer a roux. *When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    > and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.


    I'm a slurry kind of guy for turkey gravy because it's typically a lot
    more than most other kinds of gravy you'd make. I'll go the roux route
    this time. The only question I have is can you make a roux with
    cornstarch or rice flour?

  12. #12
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Nov 20, 8:39 am, "Pico Rico" <PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:
    > <rfd...@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    > > hot or
    > > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    > > cornstarch
    > > interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    > I prefer a roux. When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    > and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.


    I'm a slurry kind of guy for turkey gravy because it's typically a lot
    more than most other kinds of gravy you'd make. I'll go the roux route
    this time. The only question I have is can you make a roux with
    cornstarch or rice flour?

    sure. And you can make it a day ahead if you will be too busy on the day.



  13. #13
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 3:09*pm, dsi1 <dsi...@hawaiiantel.net> wrote:
    > On Nov 20, 8:39*am, "Pico Rico" <PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:

    ....
    >
    > I'm a slurry kind of guy for turkey gravy because it's typically a lot
    > more than most other kinds of gravy you'd make. I'll go the roux route
    > this time. The only question I have is can you make a roux with
    > cornstarch or rice flour?


    Yes and yes.

    John Kuthe...

  14. #14
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On 11/20/2011 11:15 AM, Pico Rico wrote:
    > "dsi1"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > On Nov 20, 8:39 am, "Pico Rico"<PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:
    >> <rfd...@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >>> When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    >>> hot or
    >>> cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    >>> cornstarch
    >>> interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >>
    >> I prefer a roux. When doing the turkey thing, I use turkey fat and flour,
    >> and cook it enough so it looses the flour taste.

    >
    > I'm a slurry kind of guy for turkey gravy because it's typically a lot
    > more than most other kinds of gravy you'd make. I'll go the roux route
    > this time. The only question I have is can you make a roux with
    > cornstarch or rice flour?
    >
    > sure. And you can make it a day ahead if you will be too busy on the day.


    Thanks!


  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On 11/20/2011 11:19 AM, John Kuthe wrote:
    > On Nov 20, 3:09 pm, dsi1<dsi...@hawaiiantel.net> wrote:
    >> On Nov 20, 8:39 am, "Pico Rico"<PicoR...@nonospam.com> wrote:

    > ...
    >>
    >> I'm a slurry kind of guy for turkey gravy because it's typically a lot
    >> more than most other kinds of gravy you'd make. I'll go the roux route
    >> this time. The only question I have is can you make a roux with
    >> cornstarch or rice flour?

    >
    > Yes and yes.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    Thanks.

  16. #16
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On 20/11/2011 3:38 PM, Polly Esther wrote:
    >


    >> Either flour or cornstarch can be used, but they give a little
    >> different result. I prefer cornstarch. I mix a heaping tablespoon in
    >> a cup of cold water so it is runny. Add the mix to the pot while
    >> stirring and bring to very hot, just starting to boil to thicken.

    >
    > I like to brown the flour first; dry; stovetop or oven. Can be done days
    > before Turkey roasting day. Gives the gravy nice flavor and color. Polly


    I make the roux and brown it in the fat of the meat I am making the the
    gravy for. I usually pour off the pan drippings, take a couple spoons of
    the fat and put it back in the pan and add the flour.

    I say usually because there is no single method for making gravy. It's
    a matter of using the oil and flour as a thickener and using the
    drippings for flavour. It often depends on the size and type of roast.
    If I have a small roast and don't have a lot of drippings I use broth
    for extra flavour.

  17. #17
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question


    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Uoeyq.164910$[email protected] com...
    > On 20/11/2011 3:38 PM, Polly Esther wrote:
    >>

    >
    >>> Either flour or cornstarch can be used, but they give a little
    >>> different result. I prefer cornstarch. I mix a heaping tablespoon in
    >>> a cup of cold water so it is runny. Add the mix to the pot while
    >>> stirring and bring to very hot, just starting to boil to thicken.

    >>
    >> I like to brown the flour first; dry; stovetop or oven. Can be done days
    >> before Turkey roasting day. Gives the gravy nice flavor and color. Polly

    >
    > I make the roux and brown it in the fat of the meat I am making the the
    > gravy for. I usually pour off the pan drippings, take a couple spoons of
    > the fat and put it back in the pan and add the flour.


    Absolutely!


    >
    > I say usually because there is no single method for making gravy. It's a
    > matter of using the oil and flour as a thickener and using the drippings
    > for flavour.


    Absolutely!

    It often depends on the size and type of roast.
    > If I have a small roast and don't have a lot of drippings I use broth for
    > extra flavour.


    use STOCK for extra, extra flavor. Or flavour, as the case may be.



  18. #18
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 12:51*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > When making a mixtureofflour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use hotor
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and cornstarch
    > interchangeable for this? Thanks.


    It depends.

  19. #19
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    > hot or
    > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    > cornstarch
    > interchangeable for this? Thanks.


    Cornstarch can break down when you reheat. If for some reason you don't
    want wheat flour, use sweet/glutinous rice flour.



  20. #20
    BillyZoom Guest

    Default Re: Gravy question

    On Nov 20, 5:08*pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > <rfd...@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > When making a mixture of flour and water to thicken a gravy, do you use
    > > hot or
    > > cold water? Also, is the mixture a 1 to 1 ratio? And are flour and
    > > cornstarch
    > > interchangeable for this? Thanks.

    >
    > Cornstarch can break down when you reheat. *If for some reason you don't
    > want wheat flour, use sweet/glutinous rice flour.


    Wait, was that a USEFUL post? Congratulations. My bet was "I hate
    gravy".

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