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Thread: Gravy

  1. #1
    piedmont Guest

    Default Gravy

    Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.
    --
    regards, mike
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r
    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    (mawil55)

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Apr 4, 3:00 pm, piedmont <See...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.
    >

    Only fat and milk? That doesn't sound right to me. I'd make a roux
    first with fat and flour, adding s & p and herbs complementary to the
    pork. Then add milk or broth or water to make the gravy. -aem

  3. #3
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On 4/4/2010 6:05 PM, aem wrote:
    > On Apr 4, 3:00 pm, piedmont<See...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    >> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    >> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.
    >>

    > Only fat and milk? That doesn't sound right to me. I'd make a roux
    > first with fat and flour, adding s& p and herbs complementary to the
    > pork. Then add milk or broth or water to make the gravy. -aem

    Ahh, a roux, good point! Fat already heavily flavored from seasonings on
    pork during cooking so i may skip adding to it.

    --
    regards, mike
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r
    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    (mawil55)

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont wrote:

    > Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.


    Use fat and any pan scrapings (impostant) to make a quick roux, then
    add stock, salt, and pepper to taste. Milk is OK, but you need some
    sort of stock or at least soup base/buillion.

    -sw

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    >with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    >I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.


    You don't use all that fat for gravy... pour most off reserving maybe
    an ounce to blend with a bit of flour. The gravy is made by
    dissolving the fond with some sort of liquid; stock, wine, beer, even
    water... I'd not choose milk for fresh pork but some do... scrape and
    stir while gently heating until all fond is dissolved, then heat some
    to reduce a bit if necessary, then add the fat with flour back a
    little at a time to thicken.

  6. #6
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    In article <hpb26i$sub$[email protected]>,
    piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.


    Brown (may or may not be) gravy:

    I have success with flour and water. If there are any brown bits, make
    sure you include all you can get. Add the brown bits (hopefully) and the
    half cup of fat to a two quart saucepan. Add about a pint and a half of
    water and bring to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Flavor with salt
    and pepper. If I told you how much salt, it would make you queasy. Start
    with a tablespoon. Go from there.
    Add about three tablespoons of flour to an eight ounce sealable,
    shakeable container and fill to about three quarters full. Put on the
    lid and shake thoroughly to completely incorporate.
    Take the simmering water-fat base off the stove and mix in the
    flour-water while stirring constantly (otherwise you may get mini
    dumplings as well). Put the pot back on the stove until the gravy starts
    to bubble again. Let it simmer for a couple of minutes. Adjust salt and
    pepper. If you have no brown bits, the gravy will be unnaturally pale.
    Kitchen Bouquet is a poor second to adequate brown residue to start
    with, but the gravy should taste just fine.
    If the gravy is too thin, add more flour-water slurry. If it's too
    thick, add more water.
    There is nothing healthy about it. It uses too much fat and too much
    salt, but I wouldn't trade it for the world. Pork gravy is my favorite,
    regardless of color.
    I usually roast my pork in the same open pan that I used to brown it and
    get adequate fond. Sometimes the fond is sparse, but the gravy turns out
    excellent anyway. Just kinda gray.

    White gravy:

    Add about three tablespoons of flour to the pork fat and brown bits if
    you have them, and cook on medium high for two to three minutes in a ten
    inch cast iron skillet. Add about a pint of milk. Use a whisk to
    incorporate the milk and while everything thickens. Salt and pepper to
    taste. Again, you will need more salt than you expect. If the mixture is
    too thick, add more milk. If it's too thin, reduce the volume by
    simmering. You will need to stir more than occasionally if you are
    thickening, or you may burn the gravy at the bottom of the pan. If you
    screw up, don't use that part. Adjust salt and pepper again if needed.

    Other stuff can be used to enhance gravy. I just don't.

    leo

  7. #7
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    piedmont wrote:

    >> Only fat and milk? That doesn't sound right to me. I'd make a roux
    >> first with fat and flour, adding s& p and herbs complementary to the
    >> pork. Then add milk or broth or water to make the gravy. -aem

    > Ahh, a roux, good point! Fat already heavily flavored from seasonings on
    > pork during cooking so i may skip adding to it.
    >

    I never use milk in gravy. It is stock usually, but veggie or potato
    cooking water also is wonderful in gravy.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.


    Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    you're doing.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Sun 04 Apr 2010 10:56:58p, sf told us...

    > On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    >> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    >> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.

    >
    > Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    > you're doing.
    >


    If I make gravy for a fried chicken dinner, I use some of the drippings and
    bits from frying, and half rich broth and half light cream. It's used over
    either mashed potatoes or rice.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  10. #10
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 5.250...
    > On Sun 04 Apr 2010 10:56:58p, sf told us...
    >
    >> On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >>> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    >>> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    >>> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.

    >>
    >> Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    >> you're doing.
    >>

    >
    > If I make gravy for a fried chicken dinner, I use some of the drippings
    > and
    > bits from frying, and half rich broth and half light cream. It's used
    > over
    > either mashed potatoes or rice.
    >
    > --
    >
    > ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~
    >
    > ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
    >
    > ************************************************** ********
    >
    > Wayne Boatwright
    >


    I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she made pan
    gravy after frying chicken in fat.


  11. #11
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    >> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    >> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.

    >
    > Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    > you're doing.


    "Not an expert on gravy and need advice," Duh!


  12. #12
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Mon 05 Apr 2010 04:58:49a, piedmont told us...

    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 5.250...
    >> On Sun 04 Apr 2010 10:56:58p, sf told us...
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    >>>> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of
    >>>> fat with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target,
    >>>> usually I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me
    >>>> off.
    >>>
    >>> Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    >>> you're doing.
    >>>

    >>
    >> If I make gravy for a fried chicken dinner, I use some of the drippings
    >> and bits from frying, and half rich broth and half light cream. It's
    >> used
    >> over either mashed potatoes or rice.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~
    >>
    >> ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
    >>
    >> ************************************************** ********
    >>
    >> Wayne Boatwright
    >>

    >
    > I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she made
    > pan gravy after frying chicken in fat.
    >
    >


    Milk is probably what my grandmother used too. My mother used light cream.
    Not a huge difference, really.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  13. #13
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Apr 4, 10:18*pm, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > piedmont wrote:
    > >> Only fat and milk? *That doesn't sound right to me. *I'd make a roux
    > >> first with fat and flour, adding s& *p and herbs complementary to the
    > >> pork. *Then add milk or broth or water to make the gravy. * *-aem

    > > Ahh, a roux, good point! Fat already heavily flavored from seasonings on
    > > pork during cooking so i may skip adding to it.

    >
    > * I never use milk in gravy. It is stock usually, but veggie or potato
    > cooking water also is wonderful in gravy.


    Sausage 'n Biscuits, and fried chicken = both require a milk-based
    gravy. You haven't lived until you've had it....

    ;-) N.

  14. #14
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Apr 5, 6:58*am, "piedmont" <See...@ForAddress.Net> wrote:
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwri...@arizona.usa.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected] 5.250...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sun 04 Apr 2010 10:56:58p, sf told us...

    >
    > >> On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <See...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >>> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > >>> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > >>> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > >>> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.

    >
    > >> Do you usually make milk gravy? *I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    > >> you're doing.

    >
    > > If I make gravy for a fried chicken dinner, I use some of the drippings
    > > and
    > > bits from frying, and half rich broth and half light cream. *It's used
    > > over
    > > either mashed potatoes or rice.

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    >
    > > * * * *~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    >
    > > ************************************************** ********

    >
    > > * * * * * * * * * * Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she made pan
    > gravy after frying chicken in fat.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    She probably did. I think it was very common before there all kinds
    of pre-packaged brown gravy options. It's still my favorite for fried
    chicken. Brown gravy just doesn't do it.

    N.

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Mon, 5 Apr 2010 09:03:59 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > > Wayne Boatwright

    > >
    > > I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she made pan
    > > gravy after frying chicken in fat.- Hide quoted text -
    > >


    >
    > She probably did. I think it was very common before there all kinds
    > of pre-packaged brown gravy options. It's still my favorite for fried
    > chicken. Brown gravy just doesn't do it.


    I don't fry chicken anymore, but when I did - I didn't have a clue how
    to make milk gravy. How is it made by dumping flour and milk into all
    that grease? Sounds disgusting. I never use packaged gravy mix
    either. That thought is an ugh too.




    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Mon, 5 Apr 2010 08:00:49 -0400, "piedmont" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 18:00:49 -0400, piedmont <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Not an expert on gravy and need advice, I got basically pure fat
    > >> drippings from my pork shoulder, I was thinking to dilute 1/2 cup of fat
    > >> with 1/2 cup of milk, then use that for gravy, am i off target, usually
    > >> I use dripping from a bird but the pure fat is throwing me off.

    > >
    > > Do you usually make milk gravy? I don't, so I wonder if you know what
    > > you're doing.

    >
    > "Not an expert on gravy and need advice," Duh!


    Is the point of your post to learn all about milk gravy? How many
    people do you plan to feed? I wouldn't use 1/2 of fat/grease unless I
    was making gravy for a crowd.



    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  17. #17
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Apr 5, 12:52*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Mon, 5 Apr 2010 09:03:59 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    >
    > <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote:
    > > > > Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > > > I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she made pan
    > > > gravy after frying chicken in fat.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > She probably did. *I think it was very common before there all kinds
    > > of pre-packaged brown gravy options. *It's still my favorite for fried
    > > chicken. *Brown gravy just doesn't do it.

    >
    > I don't fry chicken anymore, but when I did - I didn't have a clue how
    > to make milk gravy. *How is it made by dumping flour and milk into all
    > that grease? *Sounds disgusting. *I never use packaged gravy mix
    > either. *That thought is an ugh too.


    Are you thinking of deep-fried chicken? A lifetime ago, we made fried
    chicken by frying it in maybe a quarter-inch of... melted vegetable
    shortening? We didn't know any better, and I can't quite recall.
    There
    wasn't much grease left in the pan. A little flour to make a roux,
    although
    oftentimes enough had simply fallen off the chicken to thicken the
    gravy.
    Stir in some milk, and wait for it to thicken. Basically a milk-based
    pan sauce. Season to taste. Grandma was from Virginia, not the
    Deep South.

    Cindy Hamilton

  18. #18
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    Nancy2 <nancy-dooley@[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sausage 'n Biscuits, and fried chicken = both require a milk-based
    > gravy. You haven't lived until you've had it....
    >
    > ;-) N.



    Biscuits and sausages and eggs and hash browns and chicken fried steak,
    all drowning in sausage gravy!

    That's something we never grew up on.

    WE got bird and beef pan gravy at meals on the occasion.

    There's ringing in our ears to this day. "SAVE SOME FOR YOUR SISTER!!!"
    It was an active two-way throw switch. "SAVE SOME FOR COMPANY!!!"

    ))

    Andy

  19. #19
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Mon 05 Apr 2010 09:52:45a, sf told us...

    > On Mon, 5 Apr 2010 09:03:59 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> > > Wayne Boatwright
    >> >
    >> > I mentioned milk as I thought that was what my Granny used when she
    >> > made pan gravy after frying chicken in fat.- Hide quoted text -
    >> >

    >
    >>
    >> She probably did. I think it was very common before there all kinds
    >> of pre-packaged brown gravy options. It's still my favorite for fried
    >> chicken. Brown gravy just doesn't do it.

    >
    > I don't fry chicken anymore, but when I did - I didn't have a clue how
    > to make milk gravy. How is it made by dumping flour and milk into all
    > that grease? Sounds disgusting. I never use packaged gravy mix
    > either. That thought is an ugh too.


    What I do... Drain all fat from the skillet after frying chicken,
    reserving enough to make a standard roux with an equal amount of flour.
    After draining the fat, also scrape all the browned bits from the skillet
    and add to the roux. Cook roux until blond, then add equal amounts of
    chicken broth and milk or light cream. Standard proportions of roux to
    liquid, as for any gravy. It is *not* a greasy gravy.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Gravy

    On Mon, 05 Apr 2010 17:50:47 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What I do... Drain all fat from the skillet after frying chicken,
    > reserving enough to make a standard roux with an equal amount of flour.
    > After draining the fat, also scrape all the browned bits from the skillet
    > and add to the roux. Cook roux until blond, then add equal amounts of
    > chicken broth and milk or light cream. Standard proportions of roux to
    > liquid, as for any gravy. It is *not* a greasy gravy.


    OK, so it's basically a standard flour gravy with milk. I'll try that
    sometime. Haven't put coated chicken with flour in years, so I'll
    make it the regular way I do now... but add milk to the gravy.
    Thanks.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

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