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Thread: Grapes for breakfast

  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default Grapes for breakfast

    Grapes for breakfast

    Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for tomorrow.

    You?

    Andy

  2. #2
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Andy wrote:
    > Grapes for breakfast
    >
    > Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for tomorrow.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Andy


    That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)

    --
    Jean B.

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Jean B. said...

    > That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    > sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    > Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    > soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)



    Jean B,

    A "sandwich spread" sounds rather vague to me. That said, in my youth, peanut
    butter was an out of the question food.

    Best,

    Andy

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Andy wrote:
    > Jean B. said...
    >
    >> That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    >> sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    >> Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    >> soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)

    >
    >
    > Jean B,
    >
    > A "sandwich spread" sounds rather vague to me. That said, in my youth, peanut
    > butter was an out of the question food.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    Sandwich spread has a mayonnaise base, with minced pickled veggies
    added to it. That was how mom made PB sandwiches. Actually (and
    no one would ever believe that such things had such an origin), I
    have an old booklet from, IIRC, Heinz, which was probably the
    origin of this practice. They purveyed both products at that point.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Jean B. said...

    > Andy wrote:
    >> Jean B. said...
    >>
    >>> That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    >>> sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    >>> Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    >>> soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)

    >>
    >>
    >> Jean B,
    >>
    >> A "sandwich spread" sounds rather vague to me. That said, in my youth,
    >> peanut butter was an out of the question food.
    >>
    >> Best,
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Sandwich spread has a mayonnaise base, with minced pickled veggies
    > added to it. That was how mom made PB sandwiches. Actually (and
    > no one would ever believe that such things had such an origin), I
    > have an old booklet from, IIRC, Heinz, which was probably the
    > origin of this practice. They purveyed both products at that point.



    Jean B,

    Best I can think up that might compare is tartar sauce, which I didn't
    choose to enjoy for decades. Nor the fish it went on for that matter!

    Best,

    Andy

  6. #6
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast


    On 18-Jul-2009, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    > Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    > soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)


    Thanks for the tip on sandwich spread. I used to love the stuff; but, the
    insipid Kraft Sandwich Spread is a pale imitator of what I recall liking
    years ago. We have an international grocery nearby and I'll be checking the
    Great Britain aisle for Heinz Sandwich Spread on my next visit.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    l, not -l wrote:
    > On 18-Jul-2009, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> (I finally found more of the imported Heinz Sandwich
    >> Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    >> soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)

    >
    > Thanks for the tip on sandwich spread. I used to love the stuff; but, the
    > insipid Kraft Sandwich Spread is a pale imitator of what I recall liking
    > years ago. We have an international grocery nearby and I'll be checking the
    > Great Britain aisle for Heinz Sandwich Spread on my next visit.


    It is VERY hard to find! I couldn't find it for about 2 years,
    then went to explore another supermarket near here and was shocked
    to find it. Odd. Not even the British store near here has had it
    for the intervening years.

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast


    > Andy wrote:
    >> Grapes for breakfast
    >>
    >> Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for tomorrow.
    >>
    >> You?
    >>
    >> Andy

    >




    Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.

    gloria p

  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Gloria P said...

    > Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    >
    > gloria p



    gloria p,

    AS IF I need another addiction!

    Probably used real butter too?! :9

    Best,

    Andy

  10. #10
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Jean wrote on Sat, 18 Jul 2009 14:30:42 -0400:

    > Andy wrote:
    >> Grapes for breakfast
    >>
    >> Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers
    >> for tomorrow.
    >>
    >> You?
    >>
    >> Andy


    > That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    > sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz
    > Sandwich Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child
    > and soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)


    I don't often eat grapes for breakfast but have you tried frozen
    seedless grapes as a snack? If they are insufficiently sweet, sprinkling
    them with a little white sugar before freezing helps.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  11. #11
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ddr8m.198$[email protected]..
    > Jean wrote on Sat, 18 Jul 2009 14:30:42 -0400:
    >
    >> Andy wrote:
    >>> Grapes for breakfast
    >>>
    >>> Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers
    >>> for tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> You?
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >
    >> That was soooo long ago. A peanut butter and sandwich spread
    >> sandwich. (I finally found more of the imported Heinz
    >> Sandwich Spread, which is like the sandwich spread I ate as a child and
    >> soooo much better than the domestic stuff.)

    >
    > I don't often eat grapes for breakfast but have you tried frozen seedless
    > grapes as a snack? If they are insufficiently sweet, sprinkling them with
    > a little white sugar before freezing helps.
    >

    I got fat on grapes. No kidding. Too much sugar, and they were tooo goooood.
    Black seedless.



  12. #12
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast


    "Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> Andy wrote:
    >>> Grapes for breakfast
    >>>
    >>> Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for
    >>> tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> You?
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    >


    Oh, man. One of my favorite "why-not-just-slap-them-on-my-ass" breakfasts.
    With butter. On the muffins, not the ass.



  13. #13
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast



    Andy wrote:
    >
    > Grapes for breakfast
    >
    > Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for tomorrow.
    >
    > You?
    >
    > Andy



    Ate all the grapes already. Breakfast burrito, fresh cherries, fresh
    pineapple and decaf.

  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Gloria P wrote:
    > Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    >
    > gloria p


    What makes those stand out from other blueberry muffins?

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #15
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    "Jean B." wrote:
    >
    > Gloria P wrote:
    > > Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    > >
    > > gloria p

    >
    > What makes those stand out from other blueberry muffins?


    Probably wild blueberries. I had blueberry muffins
    made by my aunt in Upper Michigan, and they were
    fantastic. Those tiny little berries pack a lot more
    flavor than the giant farm-raised ones.

  16. #16
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > "Jean B." wrote:
    >> Gloria P wrote:
    >>> Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    >>>
    >>> gloria p

    >> What makes those stand out from other blueberry muffins?

    >
    > Probably wild blueberries. I had blueberry muffins
    > made by my aunt in Upper Michigan, and they were
    > fantastic. Those tiny little berries pack a lot more
    > flavor than the giant farm-raised ones.


    Yes, I keep looking for those. I vastly prefer them to the huge
    ones one now sees in the stores. As someone here reminded me,
    Trader Joe's has nice wild ones in their freezer case. Some
    other stores around here also have them frozen.

    --
    Jean B.

  17. #17
    elaich Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Grapes for breakfast
    >
    > Munched at two bunches of green and red seedless. Leftovers for tomorrow.


    That's a marvelous breakfast, Andy. Over the past 2 years, I've made it my
    practice to eat nothing but fruit before noon, and have lost 40 pounds. It
    seems like the practice has normalized my metabolism. I am not hungry, not
    starving, just eat nothing but apples, bananas, grapes and what-have-you
    before noon.

  18. #18
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    "Jean B." wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > >
    > > Probably wild blueberries. I had blueberry muffins
    > > made by my aunt in Upper Michigan, and they were
    > > fantastic. Those tiny little berries pack a lot more
    > > flavor than the giant farm-raised ones.

    >
    > Yes, I keep looking for those. I vastly prefer them to the huge
    > ones one now sees in the stores. As someone here reminded me,
    > Trader Joe's has nice wild ones in their freezer case. Some
    > other stores around here also have them frozen.


    I saw those today. They come from Canada.

    Several months ago, I saw a segment on Deutsche Welle TV
    about the harvesting of wild blueberries in Sweden.
    You can't get Swedes to do that work anymore. The segment
    followed these people from Thailand that do the picking.
    Even with air fare both ways, they can make more money
    picking blueberries during the harvest season in Sweden
    than they can back in Thailand.

    And, the segment showed them eating dinner. The Thais
    had discovered that chicken feet are really cheap in
    Sweden. They explained that chicken feet are a delicacy
    in Thailand, but nobody eats them in Sweden so they are
    actually cheaper in Sweden than back in Thailand.

  19. #19
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > "Jean B." wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> Probably wild blueberries. I had blueberry muffins
    >>> made by my aunt in Upper Michigan, and they were
    >>> fantastic. Those tiny little berries pack a lot more
    >>> flavor than the giant farm-raised ones.

    >> Yes, I keep looking for those. I vastly prefer them to the huge
    >> ones one now sees in the stores. As someone here reminded me,
    >> Trader Joe's has nice wild ones in their freezer case. Some
    >> other stores around here also have them frozen.

    >
    > I saw those today. They come from Canada.
    >
    > Several months ago, I saw a segment on Deutsche Welle TV
    > about the harvesting of wild blueberries in Sweden.
    > You can't get Swedes to do that work anymore. The segment
    > followed these people from Thailand that do the picking.
    > Even with air fare both ways, they can make more money
    > picking blueberries during the harvest season in Sweden
    > than they can back in Thailand.
    >
    > And, the segment showed them eating dinner. The Thais
    > had discovered that chicken feet are really cheap in
    > Sweden. They explained that chicken feet are a delicacy
    > in Thailand, but nobody eats them in Sweden so they are
    > actually cheaper in Sweden than back in Thailand.


    Very interesting. Yes, the blueberries were from Northern Canada,
    IIRC. Supposedly relatively I contaminated. Now I wonder who
    picked them. I never really thought of migrant laborers really
    far north.

    --
    Jean B.

  20. #20
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Grapes for breakfast

    Jean B. wrote:
    > Gloria P wrote:
    >> Homemade Minnesota blueberry muffins. We're getting addicted.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > What makes those stand out from other blueberry muffins?
    >



    The recipe is easy, foolproof, not too sweet, and makes 21-24
    muffins. I hadn't made blueberry muffins in many years but
    made this one four times in the past 2 1/2 weeks.

    Berries seem to be plentiful this year.

    gloria p

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