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Thread: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

  1. #1
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?

    Rib roast-
    Which would you choose and why?
    "Certified Angus" $7.99
    "Choice beef" 6.99
    "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99

    I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'? [I *am*
    familiar with lumber grading practice- and what is available. In
    lumber I'd go with a guy who knew what he was looking for over the
    'grade' every time.

    I doubt that I've ever gotten Prime, if current ads mean anything. The
    only local store that offers prime is a brand new "Meat House". They
    were giving out samples of 'prime rib' at their grand opening a week
    or two ago & I wasn't impressed. It had been marinated beyond
    recognition and was still pretty chewy.

    I can't imagine a better grade of meat than what I've been getting----
    but 'curious minds', and all that.

    Jim

  2. #2
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    | Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    |
    | Rib roast-
    | Which would you choose and why?
    | "Certified Angus" $7.99
    | "Choice beef" 6.99
    | "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    | "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    | "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    | "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    | "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    | "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    | "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    |
    | I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    | piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    | likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'?

    .........

    Absolutely. There is an additional variable called "ageing" that has
    significant effect on the end product. If you get a top level Choice
    roast that has had a few weeks of ageing it will probably taste
    better than a USDA Prime roast fresh off the hoof. One of the
    give-aways is that the fat should show a very slight yellowing,
    pure white fat is unaged. There is a somewhat raw taste to a fresh
    cut of beef, whether it is USDA Select, Choice or Prime. You want
    to avoid that and a knowledgeable butcher or meatcutter can be
    your best source of this information.

    BTW beware of the word "Prime," as it can legally be used to
    describe a rib roast, so make sure the beef is stamped "USDA
    Prime."

    As far as Angus beef vs. Choice beef, similar thing: the term
    "Angus" has been broadened to include almost anything on
    hoof that might once have looked black; it is not today an
    indicator of quality but rather that the meatpacker chose
    to pay extra to use the seal.

    Expect all sorts of arguments on this subject, btw. It
    usually is our normal holiday blowoff disagreement.

    pavane



  3. #3
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    In article <flmpg6didnn31vhcblmb6cveqlaseb3fbv@4ax.com>,
    Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    >
    > Rib roast-
    > Which would you choose and why?
    > "Certified Angus" $7.99
    > "Choice beef" 6.99
    > "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    > "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    > "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    > "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    > "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    >
    > I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    > piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    > likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'?


    Some are advertising gimmicks, and for some of those, you are paying a
    lot for bones and fat.

    > I doubt that I've ever gotten Prime, if current ads mean anything. The
    > only local store that offers prime is a brand new "Meat House". They
    > were giving out samples of 'prime rib' at their grand opening a week
    > or two ago & I wasn't impressed.


    The following applies to the US. Prime rib is a cut of meat, not a
    grade. The term was invented long before there was USDA grading. We
    have this argument at least once every year on this group, so Victor put
    it in the FAQ:

    http://vsack.homepage.t-online.de/rfc_faq.html

    Section 3 - Glossary

    "PRIME RIB - In the USA, a popular term referring to a standing rib roast
    of beef. "Prime" in the term refers to one of the primal cuts of beef
    and not, as is often incorrectly assumed, to the USDA grade of beef.
    This usage precedes the establishment of the US beef grading standards,
    which explains the confusion. This is explicitly acknowledged by the
    USDA in its publications. The USDA technical name for the cut is "beef
    rib roast.""

    If you want USDA Prime, be sure the label says "USDA Prime". If you
    want the top grade of prime rib, look for "USDA Prime prime rib".

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 11:26:34 -0500, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    >
    >Rib roast-
    >Which would you choose and why?
    >"Certified Angus" $7.99
    >"Choice beef" 6.99
    >"USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    >"USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    >"Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    >"Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    >"Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    >"Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    >"Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    >
    >I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    >piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    >likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'? [I *am*
    >familiar with lumber grading practice- and what is available. In
    >lumber I'd go with a guy who knew what he was looking for over the
    >'grade' every time.
    >
    >I doubt that I've ever gotten Prime, if current ads mean anything. The
    >only local store that offers prime is a brand new "Meat House". They
    >were giving out samples of 'prime rib' at their grand opening a week
    >or two ago & I wasn't impressed. It had been marinated beyond
    >recognition and was still pretty chewy.
    >
    >I can't imagine a better grade of meat than what I've been getting----
    >but 'curious minds', and all that.
    >
    >Jim


    With your knowlege of beef I suggest SPAM.

  5. #5
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote
    > As far as Angus beef vs. Choice beef, similar thing: the term
    > "Angus" has been broadened to include almost anything on
    > hoof that might once have looked black; it is not today an
    > indicator of quality but rather that the meatpacker chose
    > to pay extra to use the seal.


    Maybe, but is some cases, it really is better.

    A few years ago, I saw two steaks in the supermarket. They were NY Strip,
    about 3/4" thick, very close in size. The difference was that one was
    Certified Angus, the other was Plain Old Cow, choice grade. I bought one
    of each. Seasoned them the same, cooked them the same, side by side. The
    Angus was sure better than the other. My wife and I split both of them and
    she did not know the origins, but definitely liked the Angus better than
    POC. It was about $1 a pound more and worth it.


  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 11:26:34 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

    > Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    >
    > Rib roast-
    > Which would you choose and why?
    > "Certified Angus" $7.99
    > "Choice beef" 6.99
    > "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    > "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    > "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    > "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    > "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99


    Anything "Certified Angus" is just a buzz word. The quality is all
    over the board. Look for USDA graded Certified Angus (Choice or
    better). Much of the Certified Angus is still not graded, and
    would actually grade out to USDA Select if it were. They started
    allowing grading of Certified Angus after their assurances that is
    was at least USDA Choice turned out to be false.

    Large end is my preferred cut. It comes from closer to the chuck
    (shoulder) end of the moo and has a smaller eye and the larger
    portions of the "flaps" which surround the eye (which are the best
    part of a ribeye, IMO). But the large end has slightly more waste
    in the form of fat and bone.

    "Taste of inspirations" is an awfully corny name used to describe
    pieces of a dead cow. Make of it what you will.

    "Choice Beef" means USDA choice. This is the grade that is
    preferable for a decent rib roast.

    "Boned and tied" means you get the flavor and meat of the bones and
    the ease of carving. They're not worth any more than their bone in
    counterpart. You can easily remove the rib rack after it's been
    cooked, plus you have the option of serving thick cuts of bone-in
    prime rib.

    > I doubt that I've ever gotten Prime, if current ads mean anything. The
    > only local store that offers prime is a brand new "Meat House".


    Meat House is not all it's cracked up to be. You're much better
    off shopping at CostCo for the same grades or about 40% cheaper.

    > They
    > were giving out samples of 'prime rib' at their grand opening a week
    > or two ago & I wasn't impressed. It had been marinated beyond
    > recognition and was still pretty chewy.


    Same with their over-marinated lamb. And the "fresh" sausage I
    bought was rotten. I wrote corporate with a picture of the
    sausages, the receipt, and specifically _telling_ them to refund my
    money and never heard a damn thing back from them. So I wrote them
    a really nasty Yelp review instead. The Meat House is for people
    who have no sense of food value. Some of the branded items were 5x
    more than if you bought them at a regular grocer.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 12:20:47 -0500, pavane wrote:

    > Expect all sorts of arguments on this subject, btw. It
    > usually is our normal holiday blowoff disagreement.


    "Prime Rib must be USDA Prime to be called Prime Rib"

    Somebody had to say it.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 10:03:40 -0800, Dan Abel wrote:

    > http://vsack.homepage.t-online.de/rfc_faq.html
    >
    > Section 3 - Glossary
    > ...The USDA technical name for the cut is "beef rib roast.""


    That is incorrect. The correct technical names for bone in prime
    rib we see at the retail stores are:

    Item No. 109D - Beef Rib, Roast-Ready, Cover Off, Short Cut
    Item No. 109E - Beef Rib, Ribeye Roll, Lip-On, Bone In

    In it's most simplest form, it is "109: Beef Rib, Roast Ready".
    But the roasts we see at retail are prepped well beyond this simple
    cut that has a huge layer of fat and longer rib bones. These are
    not sold retail unless you ask for one. And even then it would be
    difficult to obtain. We do have one store in town who sells this
    cut as steaks and labels it as "Value Beef" (at about 40% less than
    regular rib roast/steaks).

    There is no technical USDA name "Beef Rib Roast".

    Technically, of course.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    Jim Elbrecht wrote:
    >
    > Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    >
    > Rib roast-
    > Which would you choose and why?
    > "Certified Angus" $7.99
    > "Choice beef" 6.99
    > "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    > "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    > "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    > "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    > "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    > "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    >
    > I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    > piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    > likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'? [I *am*
    > familiar with lumber grading practice- and what is available. In
    > lumber I'd go with a guy who knew what he was looking for over the
    > 'grade' every time.
    >
    > I doubt that I've ever gotten Prime, if current ads mean anything. The
    > only local store that offers prime is a brand new "Meat House". They
    > were giving out samples of 'prime rib' at their grand opening a week
    > or two ago & I wasn't impressed. It had been marinated beyond
    > recognition and was still pretty chewy.
    >
    > I can't imagine a better grade of meat than what I've been getting----
    > but 'curious minds', and all that.
    >
    > Jim


    Angus is a breed, not a grade, but Angus is usually tastier than
    non-Angus. Prime, choice and select are grades, but really only refer to
    the fat marbling in the meat which has some correlation to tenderness
    and flavorfullness, but nothing hard and fast. Grain fed and grass fed
    are more options beyond the grading, just like Angus. Non-aged, wet aged
    and dry aged are further qualifiers that make a significant difference
    irrespective of grade. You can also find meats that have never been
    frozen which is yet another variable.

    Basically it's a big convoluted mess. You really need to find a source
    of quality dead cow staffed by people who know their products and try
    the various options to see what you prefer.

  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    "Jim Elbrecht" wrote

    > Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?


    Some are but like all cuts of meat, there are no truely bad ones, just
    cooking adaptions that must be used to get proper results.


  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    pavane <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:flmpg6didnn31vhcblmb6c[email protected]..
    >> Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    >>
    >> Rib roast-
    >> Which would you choose and why?
    >> "Certified Angus" $7.99
    >> "Choice beef" 6.99
    >> "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    >> "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    >> "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    >> "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    >> "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    >> "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    >> "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    >>
    >> I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    >> piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    >> likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'?

    >
    > ........
    >
    > Absolutely. There is an additional variable called "ageing" that has
    > significant effect on the end product. If you get a top level Choice
    > roast that has had a few weeks of ageing it will probably taste
    > better than a USDA Prime roast fresh off the hoof. One of the
    > give-aways is that the fat should show a very slight yellowing,
    > pure white fat is unaged. There is a somewhat raw taste to a fresh
    > cut of beef, whether it is USDA Select, Choice or Prime. You want
    > to avoid that and a knowledgeable butcher or meatcutter can be
    > your best source of this information.
    >
    > BTW beware of the word "Prime," as it can legally be used to
    > describe a rib roast, so make sure the beef is stamped "USDA
    > Prime."


    Right, it specifically refers to a standing rib roast which contains the
    first, or "prime", rib. Very misleading indeed but standard practice.

    >
    > As far as Angus beef vs. Choice beef, similar thing: the term
    > "Angus" has been broadened to include almost anything on
    > hoof that might once have looked black; it is not today an
    > indicator of quality but rather that the meatpacker chose
    > to pay extra to use the seal.


    That's a huge misrepresentation. "Certified Angus Beef" or CAB is not a
    cheapo marketing device which amounts to paying to put a marketing imprint
    on any random piece of meat. You most certainly cannot buy the seal to slap
    on random meat because the animal was black. Sorry, that's just silly. As if
    any meatcutter would know that anyway from a carcass which has already been
    skinned and hung. The CAB designation is a genuine breeders' association
    mark which signifies that the meat comes from cattle from specific breed
    bloodlines which have been fed, raised, and handled according to specific
    guidelines. CAB is usually choice grade or better, because the standards
    lead to higher quality beef in most cases, but USDA grade is not based on
    breeding. CAB can potentially recieve any of the available USDA grades, just
    like any other beef. So can plain, non-CAB Angus beef.

    That *seal* you refer to, assuming you mean the CAB seal, does not apply to
    all Angus. It's entirely possible for Angus breed cattle to be raised for
    market without complying with those standards, and that beef can be called
    Angus, but not CAB. The term was never broadened. You're probably just
    seeing more Angus beef that is not CAB. I don't know what is required to
    just call beef "Angus" without the certified part, but to me it's
    meanignless.

    >
    > Expect all sorts of arguments on this subject, btw. It
    > usually is our normal holiday blowoff disagreement.
    >


    Then here ya go!

    MartyB in KC


  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Right, it specifically refers to a standing rib roast which contains
    > the first, or "prime", rib. Very misleading indeed but standard
    > practice.


    And as was also pointed out, refers to the primal cut as well. Just making
    sure nobody thinks I'm disputing that point.

    MartyB



  13. #13
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> As far as Angus beef vs. Choice beef, similar thing: the term
    >> "Angus" has been broadened to include almost anything on
    >> hoof that might once have looked black; it is not today an
    >> indicator of quality but rather that the meatpacker chose
    >> to pay extra to use the seal.

    >
    > Maybe, but is some cases, it really is better.
    >
    > A few years ago, I saw two steaks in the supermarket. They were NY
    > Strip, about 3/4" thick, very close in size. The difference was that
    > one was Certified Angus, the other was Plain Old Cow, choice grade. I
    > bought one of each. Seasoned them the same, cooked them the same,
    > side by side. The Angus was sure better than the other. My wife and
    > I split both of them and she did not know the origins, but definitely
    > liked the Angus better than POC. It was about $1 a pound more and
    > worth it.


    As a barbecuer, Ed, you would appreciate CAB whole packer cut brisket. The
    points are marbled to the degree they should be declared an addictive drug.
    We always pay extra for choice CAB in barbecue competition and its worth it.
    Of course, there are the crazies out there who bring in hundred-dollar hunks
    of Waygu. Yikes.

    ;-)

    MartyB


  14. #14
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > As a barbecuer, Ed, you would appreciate CAB whole packer cut brisket.
    > The points are marbled to the degree they should be declared an addictive
    > drug. We always pay extra for choice CAB in barbecue competition and its
    > worth it. Of course, there are the crazies out there who bring in
    > hundred-dollar hunks of Waygu. Yikes.


    Never saw one around here, but I'll have to see if I can order one. I've
    seen "choice" grade of the standard ones though.


  15. #15
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ierbsl$m7u$[email protected]..
    |
    | pavane <[email protected]> wrote:
    | > "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | > news:[email protected]..
    | >> Are some of these things just advertising gimmicks?
    | >>
    | >> Rib roast-
    | >> Which would you choose and why?
    | >> "Certified Angus" $7.99
    | >> "Choice beef" 6.99
    | >> "USDA Choice small end" $8.99
    | >> "USDA Choice large end" $8.49
    | >> "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Small End Rib Roast " $9.99
    | >> "Taste Of Inspirations Angus Beef Large End Rib Roast " $8.99
    | >> "Usda Choice Whole Trimmed Beef Rib " $8.49
    | >> "Bone in Prime Rib" $10.99
    | >> "Boned and tied Prime Rib" $11.99
    | >>
    | >> I know a kid in the shop that sells the first 2. Would a choice
    | >> piece that is selected by someone who knows what they're doing be
    | >> likely to be as good as a prime piece 'off the rack'?
    | >
    | > ........
    | >
    | > Absolutely. There is an additional variable called "ageing" that has
    | > significant effect on the end product. If you get a top level Choice
    | > roast that has had a few weeks of ageing it will probably taste
    | > better than a USDA Prime roast fresh off the hoof. One of the
    | > give-aways is that the fat should show a very slight yellowing,
    | > pure white fat is unaged. There is a somewhat raw taste to a fresh
    | > cut of beef, whether it is USDA Select, Choice or Prime. You want
    | > to avoid that and a knowledgeable butcher or meatcutter can be
    | > your best source of this information.
    | >
    | > BTW beware of the word "Prime," as it can legally be used to
    | > describe a rib roast, so make sure the beef is stamped "USDA
    | > Prime."
    |
    | Right, it specifically refers to a standing rib roast which contains the
    | first, or "prime", rib. Very misleading indeed but standard practice.
    |
    | >
    | > As far as Angus beef vs. Choice beef, similar thing: the term
    | > "Angus" has been broadened to include almost anything on
    | > hoof that might once have looked black; it is not today an
    | > indicator of quality but rather that the meatpacker chose
    | > to pay extra to use the seal.
    |
    | That's a huge misrepresentation. "Certified Angus Beef" or CAB is not a
    | cheapo marketing device which amounts to paying to put a marketing imprint
    | on any random piece of meat. You most certainly cannot buy the seal to slap
    | on random meat because the animal was black. Sorry, that's just silly. As if
    | any meatcutter would know that anyway from a carcass which has already been
    | skinned and hung. The CAB designation is a genuine breeders' association
    | mark which signifies that the meat comes from cattle from specific breed
    | bloodlines which have been fed, raised, and handled according to specific
    | guidelines. CAB is usually choice grade or better, because the standards
    | lead to higher quality beef in most cases, but USDA grade is not based on
    | breeding. CAB can potentially recieve any of the available USDA grades, just
    | like any other beef. So can plain, non-CAB Angus beef.
    |
    | That *seal* you refer to, assuming you mean the CAB seal, does not apply to
    | all Angus. It's entirely possible for Angus breed cattle to be raised for
    | market without complying with those standards, and that beef can be called
    | Angus, but not CAB. The term was never broadened. You're probably just
    | seeing more Angus beef that is not CAB. I don't know what is required to
    | just call beef "Angus" without the certified part, but to me it's
    | meanignless.

    Oh I completely agree. If the Certified Angus people had bothered to
    protect their trademarks it would be fine. As things stand anyone can wander
    into any mediocre meat shop and find things called "Angus Beef" or
    "Genuine Angus" or whatever. As the article in Slate below notes, even
    McDonalds has Angus Beef, but it sure isn't Certified Angus Beef. Big
    difference, and as long as the term can be fudged like this it is of little use
    to the general public.

    http://www.slate.com/id/2231807/ and
    http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/promo...gus_promo.html and
    http://www.allbusiness.com/retail-tr...4256536-1.html
    The latter of which is Albertson's website, which states:
    "Steakhouse Choice is a remarkably
    tender and juicy cut of beef that's not only USDA Choice Angus Beef,..."

    Until they can clean up that gross misuse of the Angus term I stand by
    what I said above. I'm pretty sure you agree, too.

    pavane



  16. #16
    Lyndon Watson Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    On Dec 19, 7:41*am, "Ed Pawlowski" <e...@snetnospam.net> wrote:
    > A few years ago, I saw two steaks in the supermarket. *They were NY Strip,
    > about 3/4" thick, very close in size.


    For 20 years now I've been seeing references in this newsgroup to New
    York steaks (is NY Strip the same?). Finally, I ask, what IS a New
    York steak?

    I am familiar with sirloin and porterhouse, fillet and scotch fillet/
    ribeye, and rump, but the New York steak is unknown here.

    Come, enlightenment, without the cluebat.

    LW

  17. #17
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    "Lyndon Watson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Dec 19, 7:41 am, "Ed Pawlowski" <e...@snetnospam.net> wrote:
    >> A few years ago, I saw two steaks in the supermarket. They were NY
    >> Strip,
    >> about 3/4" thick, very close in size.

    >
    > For 20 years now I've been seeing references in this newsgroup to New
    > York steaks (is NY Strip the same?). Finally, I ask, what IS a New
    > York steak?
    >
    > I am familiar with sirloin and porterhouse, fillet and scotch fillet/
    > ribeye, and rump, but the New York steak is unknown here.
    >
    > Come, enlightenment, without the cluebat.
    >
    > LW


    Strip Steak (aka NY Strip) comes from the same section as the porterhouse.
    It's basically the top loin portion of the tenderloin. They're a much
    better buy than a T-bone steak because you get two in one. Why not ask your
    butcher?

    Jill


  18. #18
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]

    Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > The following applies to the US. Prime rib is a cut of meat, not a
    > grade. The term was invented long before there was USDA grading. We
    > have this argument at least once every year on this group, so Victor put
    > it in the FAQ:
    >
    > http://vsack.homepage.t-online.de/rfc_faq.html
    >
    > Section 3 - Glossary
    >
    > "PRIME RIB - In the USA, a popular term referring to a standing rib roast
    > of beef. "Prime" in the term refers to one of the primal cuts of beef
    > and not, as is often incorrectly assumed, to the USDA grade of beef.
    > This usage precedes the establishment of the US beef grading standards,
    > which explains the confusion. This is explicitly acknowledged by the
    > USDA in its publications. The USDA technical name for the cut is "beef
    > rib roast.""
    >
    > If you want USDA Prime, be sure the label says "USDA Prime". If you
    > want the top grade of prime rib, look for "USDA Prime prime rib".


    So technically we could have USDA Choice prime rib roast or a USDA Prime
    prime rib roast. In practice if the USDA grade is listed the
    grandfathered use of the word prime is not listed.

    USDA Prime rib roast - It's both meanings of the word prime.
    Prime rib roast with no listed USDA grade - It's probably graded Choice
    or Select and the grade is not listed for marketing reasons.

  19. #19
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> As a barbecuer, Ed, you would appreciate CAB whole packer cut
    >> brisket. The points are marbled to the degree they should be
    >> declared an addictive drug. We always pay extra for choice CAB in
    >> barbecue competition and its worth it. Of course, there are the
    >> crazies out there who bring in hundred-dollar hunks of Waygu. Yikes.

    >
    > Never saw one around here, but I'll have to see if I can order one. I've
    > seen "choice" grade of the standard ones though.


    Non-CAB choice is still worth the extra money, especially if you are partial
    to the point half. If you have a Costco or Sams membership, check there for
    CAB. I know meat quality at these stores varies by area, but around here
    they are pretty good and Costco often has CAB beef. IIRC so did Sams but I
    haven't shopped there for a while. Costco had a better deal on the TV I
    wanted so I defected. ;-)

    MartyB


  20. #20
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Grades of meat [rib roasts]


    Lyndon Watson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Dec 19, 7:41 am, "Ed Pawlowski" <e...@snetnospam.net> wrote:
    >> A few years ago, I saw two steaks in the supermarket. They were NY
    >> Strip, about 3/4" thick, very close in size.

    >
    > For 20 years now I've been seeing references in this newsgroup to New
    > York steaks (is NY Strip the same?). Finally, I ask, what IS a New
    > York steak?
    >
    > I am familiar with sirloin and porterhouse, fillet and scotch fillet/
    > ribeye, and rump, but the New York steak is unknown here.
    >
    > Come, enlightenment, without the cluebat.
    >
    > LW


    Same as KC strip, or strip loin steak.

    MartyB

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