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Thread: Goodbye Seafood

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Goodbye Seafood

    Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    oil to disperse it. Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    products again.


  2. #2
    atec7 7 Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    > leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    > oil to disperse it. Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    > that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    > Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    > products again.
    >

    In a year 99% of evidence re the spill will be gone and in two years

    nature will have repaired it if left alone , we had a much smaller

    partial spill recently in Queensland it is as before , BP might be sent

    bankrupt r even pay something in the US but elsewhere it will continue

    as oil company's do to fsk the environment completely for profit


    Alturnative power is looking much cheaper now

  3. #3
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On 2010-06-13, atec7 7 <""> wrote:

    > nature will have repaired it if left alone....


    True. Unfortunately, our fishing the oceans barren will have a much
    more devestating impact. You know, like the end of life on this
    planet. A much better reason to quit eating seafood at this time.

    nb

  4. #4
    Hollywood®Boy Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    notbob wrote:
    : On 2010-06-13, atec7 7 <""> wrote:
    :
    :: nature will have repaired it if left alone....
    :
    : True. Unfortunately, our fishing the oceans barren will have a much
    : more devestating impact. You know, like the end of life on this
    : planet. A much better reason to quit eating seafood at this time.
    :
    : nb

    jump now! leave while you have the chance!



  5. #5
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 07:09:01 -0700, Hollywood®Boy <"manny or
    borg"@spam.email.com> wrote:

    >notbob wrote:
    >: On 2010-06-13, atec7 7 <""> wrote:
    >:
    >:: nature will have repaired it if left alone....
    >:
    >: True. Unfortunately, our fishing the oceans barren will have a much
    >: more devestating impact. You know, like the end of life on this
    >: planet. A much better reason to quit eating seafood at this time.
    >:
    >: nb
    >
    >jump now! leave while you have the chance!
    >


    Don't be so ****ing flippant. The seafood industry will take a hard
    hit for the next few years, only companies that are stable will
    weather the downturn. Many small business people with boats who depend
    on a continuous catch will go under and loose their boats.
    Tourism, diving boats, and anything related to the oceans will take a
    hard hit as well. You think just the seafood industry will be
    involved, not a chance, it will be far reaching and last years.

  6. #6
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    "Stu" wrote
    > Hollywood®Boy wrote:
    >>notbob wrote:


    >>: True. Unfortunately, our fishing the oceans barren will have a much
    >>: more devestating impact. You know, like the end of life on this
    >>: planet. A much better reason to quit eating seafood at this time.
    >>: nb


    There's a reason why I like the idea of farmed catfish and farmed trout.
    There are lots of farmed types that are done in their own 'aquarium type
    settings' (and I don't mean a caged set of ocean water). Done correctly you
    have a sustainable crop with no ocean impact (the 2 samples are fresh water
    anyways).

    >>jump now! leave while you have the chance!


    > Don't be so ****ing flippant. The seafood industry will take a hard
    > hit for the next few years, only companies that are stable will
    > weather the downturn. Many small business people with boats who depend
    > on a continuous catch will go under and loose their boats.
    > Tourism, diving boats, and anything related to the oceans will take a
    > hard hit as well. You think just the seafood industry will be
    > involved, not a chance, it will be far reaching and last years.


    Stu, keep in mind this affects the Gulf of Mexico, not the whole world. The
    seafood industry and tourism off the Gulf will be affected for years, but
    not a world-wide event like you make it sound.



  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On 2010-06-13, cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's a reason why I like the idea of farmed catfish and farmed trout.


    I agree, too a point, C. Catfish and talapia are OK. They can eat
    plant food which is very sustainable. Trout, OTOH, are protein
    eaters. I wonder where they get trout food from. If, like salmon,
    they feed them processed protein made from other seafood, not so good.
    The other down side is, in order to increase farmed fish yields,
    severe crowding is the norm and then antibiotics are introduced to
    prevent disease. Constant ingestion of any antibiotic deceases your
    ability to benefit from the use of other antibiotics should YOU come
    down with something. Another bummer. Nothing is for free. :|

    nb

  8. #8
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 06:41:01 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    >leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    >oil to disperse it. Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    >that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    >Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    >products again.


    BP is only the Pit Bull that Obama and his DC cronies unleashed.
    Anyways, not to worry about the oil, the toothpaste is already out of
    the tube, they'll clean it up... at least you can see it... why aren't
    people up in arms when for many years they've been warned to limit
    their consumption of seafood due to heavy metal pollution, huh, yoose
    think mercury isn't killing critters too, yoose just don't see it is
    all... you sharonbrown nose imbecile.

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On Jun 13, 6:41*am, sharonbr...@nospam.com wrote:
    > Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    > leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    > oil to disperse it. *Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    > that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    > Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    > products again.


    I'm pretty sure there's sdtill seafod in Maine, Alaska, Asia, and
    South America.

    I'm eating fish from Latvia right now (gourmonds will know what I'm
    eating).

    -sw

  10. #10
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:NH6Rn.97082$[email protected]:

    > Trout, OTOH, are protein
    > eaters. I wonder where they get trout food from. If, like
    > salmon, they feed them processed protein made from other
    > seafood, not so good.


    Perhaps they feed them beef, just like they feed beef fish which
    was given a while back as one of the reasons why the US overthrew
    Allende, because he wanted to nationalize the Chilean fishing
    industry which was used to provide fish meal to US beef to get that
    good steak taste. Probably, the extra 10c/lb increase to give
    fishermen and cannery workers a decent wage was just "too much".

    Either way, whatever is going on here, someone is going to pay for
    it with their life.

    --

    "When a government starts to cancel dissent or avoid dissent
    is frankly when it's rapidly losing its moral authority to
    govern."

    Stephen Harper, 18 April 2005

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 22:48:54 +1000, atec7 7 <""atec77\"@ hotmail.com">
    wrote:

    > In a year 99% of evidence re the spill will be gone and in two years
    >
    > nature will have repaired it if left alone ,


    Total BS.


    > we had a much smaller partial spill recently in Queensland it is as before


    We had one in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 20 years ago and that area
    still hasn't recovered.
    http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/Quarterly/j...ture_jas01.htm

    You can keep all the oil spills, let them kill your coral reefs &
    fisheries and let nature deal with it.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  12. #12
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    notbob wrote:
    >
    > eaters. I wonder where they get trout food from. If, like salmon,
    > they feed them processed protein made from other seafood, not so good.


    A lot of it is made from krill. Most of
    the krill harvest goes to fish food.
    It's especially useful for salmon, because
    krill is rich in astaxanthin, which gives
    the flesh its red color. The ocean is
    full of krill. The current harvest isn't
    close to impacting the krill population.
    Salmon farming is a way to convert this
    under-used resource into food.

  13. #13
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > I'm eating fish from Latvia right now (gourmonds will know what I'm
    > eating).


    Yes, it comes from a can.

  14. #14
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    cshenk wrote:

    >
    > Stu, keep in mind this affects the Gulf of Mexico, not the whole world.
    > The seafood industry and tourism off the Gulf will be affected for
    > years, but not a world-wide event like you make it sound.
    >
    >



    Have you seen a not-so-long-term graphic of the plume of oil being
    carried around the tip of Florida and joining the Gulf Stream, heading
    north along the east coast and circling around toward Europe? It was
    done by NOAA and a couple of oceanographers, IIRC, about two weeks ago,
    and it was very ugly.

    gloria p

  15. #15
    Tom Biasi Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gng916t6ms7184pd16tgeufplsuquhb4m3@4ax.[email protected]..
    > Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    > leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    > oil to disperse it. Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    > that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    > Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    > products again.
    >

    I think my Alaska King Crab and Maine lobsters are OK for now, and most of
    my shrimp doesn't come from the gulf.
    The Atlantic salmon is safe for a while.
    In no way are my comments meant to trivialize the event but the end of all
    seafood perhaps forever is a bit much.

    Tom



  16. #16
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    On 2010-06-13, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > the flesh its red color. The ocean is
    > full of krill. The current harvest isn't
    > close to impacting the krill population.
    > Salmon farming is a way to convert this
    > under-used resource into food.


    Ummm.... not what I've heard/read. Global warming is already
    beginning to impact major Arctic and Antarctic krill populations, to
    the point where reduced whale pops in the Arctic are already evident.

    Anyone who believes global warming is a scam is living in a fool's
    paradise. It's impacting everything from krill on up and everything
    in the ecosystem below, like phytoplankton, diatoms, coral, etc.

    I keep recalling a frighteningly prophetic fictional short story
    published in one of the Whole Earth catalogs way back in the early
    70s. It was about a near instant catastophic accident, a scenario
    forshadowing the Exxon Valdez fiasco. Only, instead of merely oil,
    the spill was a new super herbicide/defoliant, like ogent orange
    and/or Monsanto's Round Up, only hundreds of times stronger to deal
    with more resistant food crops developed for a newly emerging
    agricultural Africa. The villian chemical, spilled off the West coast
    of Africa, immediately began killing off phytoplankton in the Atlantic
    ocean in doomsday proportions.

    Today, people just yawn about mankind burning off the great rain
    forests of the World, but if phytoplankton, which provides 80% of the
    World's oxygen, is destroyed, be it a chemical accident or global
    warming, what then? The story sounded too fantastic and far fetched
    to consider, back then. Not so much, today.

    nb

  17. #17
    graham Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Not only is most or all seafood contaminated with oil from the BP
    > leak, but it's also poisoned with the chemical they are adding to the
    > oil to disperse it. Seafood is no longer safe to eat, and on top of
    > that, this oil may wipe out all seafood for many years, or forever.
    > Be sure to send a f__k you letter to BP, and never buy any of their
    > products again.
    >

    There was massive oil pollution along the New England coast during the war
    due to u-boats sinking tankers. The fishery soon recovered.

    Remember, Mexico had a MUCH bigger blowout in the Gulf a few years ago.



  18. #18
    graham Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood


    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hv34hd$kd6$[email protected]..
    > cshenk wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Stu, keep in mind this affects the Gulf of Mexico, not the whole world.
    >> The seafood industry and tourism off the Gulf will be affected for years,
    >> but not a world-wide event like you make it sound.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Have you seen a not-so-long-term graphic of the plume of oil being carried
    > around the tip of Florida and joining the Gulf Stream, heading north along
    > the east coast and circling around toward Europe? It was done by NOAA and
    > a couple of oceanographers, IIRC, about two weeks ago, and it was very
    > ugly.
    >

    And it is all speculation!



  19. #19
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood

    "notbob" wrote
    > cshenk wrote:


    >> There's a reason why I like the idea of farmed catfish and farmed trout.


    > I agree, too a point, C. Catfish and talapia are OK. They can eat
    > plant food which is very sustainable. Trout, OTOH, are protein
    > eaters. I wonder where they get trout food from. If, like salmon,
    > they feed them processed protein made from other seafood, not so good.


    Figure that pellet is what we don't eat and they arent exactly fishing for
    it fresh. It's the leftovers and a wise use of them. It's like when I give
    my dog the gristle of a meat. He thinks I'm God and then best thing since
    sliced meatloaf! ;-)

    > The other down side is, in order to increase farmed fish yields,
    > severe crowding is the norm and then antibiotics are introduced to
    > prevent disease. Constant ingestion of any antibiotic deceases your
    > ability to benefit from the use of other antibiotics should YOU come
    > down with something. Another bummer. Nothing is for free. :|


    There are different types of these farms. Not all are like that. I won't
    get overseas hydroponically raised shrimp due to that though.


  20. #20
    Onei Guest

    Default Re: Goodbye Seafood


    notbob;1489305 Wrote:
    > On 2010-06-13, atec7 7 "" wrote:
    > -
    > nature will have repaired it if left alone....-
    >
    > True. Unfortunately, our fishing the oceans barren will have a much
    > more devestating impact. You know, like the end of life on this
    > planet. A much better reason to quit eating seafood at this time.
    >
    > nb


    Very true. The shear tonnage of wildlife ripped out of the sea and
    killed in nets is totally unsustainable and is going to end in disaster.




    --
    Onei

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