Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

  1. #1
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 01/05/2011 6:50 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > I peeled it, though mom said to scrape the outside.
    > It's sort of like a carrot, but you don't eat it raw
    > and it doesn't develop that awful flavor carrots do
    > when cooked. At only $1.69/lb at the Asian food store,
    > it's cheaper than carrots at Safeway.
    >
    > The Wikipedia article says it's like artichoke.
    > It's sufficiently close, I may try steaming it
    > and eating it with typical artichoke condiments.



    That article also talks about it being used for medicinal purposes. It
    reminded me of my neighbour's back 40 where there is a lot of stinging
    nettles. He told me that it is a good cure for arthritis. He said that
    if you you rub it on the afflicted area it provides some relief. I am
    not sure that is true. I was weeding in my yard the other day and came
    across some young stinging nettle plants. I convinced myself that if I
    handled the young plants gently I would not have a problem. I was
    wrong. I endured the annoying sting of that thing for two days and this
    morning my one finger that has a bit of arthritis in it was sore. It had
    not bothered me for months.... until I was exposed to the cure.

  2. #2
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 01/05/2011 7:45 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> That article also talks about it being used for medicinal purposes. It
    >> reminded me of my neighbour's back 40 where there is a lot of stinging
    >> nettles. He told me that it is a good cure for arthritis. He said that
    >> if you you rub it on the afflicted area it provides some relief. I am
    >> not sure that is true. I was weeding in my yard the other day and came
    >> across some young stinging nettle plants. I convinced myself that if I
    >> handled the young plants gently I would not have a problem. I was
    >> wrong. I endured the annoying sting of that thing for two days and this
    >> morning my one finger that has a bit of arthritis in it was sore. It had
    >> not bothered me for months.... until I was exposed to the cure.

    >
    > I don't know if I've ever seen a stinging nettle,
    > but there's a well-known phenomenon in medicine
    > called counter-irritation. If you have a pain
    > in one part of the body, irritating another part
    > nearby can divert attention from the pain, providing
    > some relief. That's why bee stings are sometimes
    > recommended for joint pain, as well as devices
    > that poke the skin with sharp points or deliver
    > small electric shocks.


    It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    My mom was telling me about how my grandmother used
    to cook with gobo, and it sounded pretty good, so
    I bought some today. I just ate some in soup.

    It's good. It doesn't have a strong flavor, but
    it does have a nice texture. I did soak it for
    10 minutes as recommended here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_burdock

    I peeled it, though mom said to scrape the outside.
    It's sort of like a carrot, but you don't eat it raw
    and it doesn't develop that awful flavor carrots do
    when cooked. At only $1.69/lb at the Asian food store,
    it's cheaper than carrots at Safeway.

    The Wikipedia article says it's like artichoke.
    It's sufficiently close, I may try steaming it
    and eating it with typical artichoke condiments.

  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 2011-05-01, Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    > problems with it.......


    Boy howdy! I peed on one when I was 8 yrs old. Swung away from me.
    Guess where it swung back to.

    nb

  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 01/05/2011 8:18 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    >> problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    >> had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    >> until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    >> handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    >> felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.

    >
    > Reading this:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle
    >
    > I think I may have touched a stinging nettle when
    > I was a teenager. I just barely touched it, and
    > immediately got a sharp pain even though I couldn't
    > see a thorn or wound in my finger.



    That could have been it. You do not see the spines that inflict that
    annoying stinging feeling for a day or two. If you can locate the area
    and squeeze it out you are doing well. The problem is that yo usually
    get a bunch of them and will still have some in there. After a few days
    they cause a bit f infection and you can see the pussy spots to better
    locate them and squeeze them out.

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > That article also talks about it being used for medicinal purposes. It
    > reminded me of my neighbour's back 40 where there is a lot of stinging
    > nettles. He told me that it is a good cure for arthritis. He said that
    > if you you rub it on the afflicted area it provides some relief. I am
    > not sure that is true. I was weeding in my yard the other day and came
    > across some young stinging nettle plants. I convinced myself that if I
    > handled the young plants gently I would not have a problem. I was
    > wrong. I endured the annoying sting of that thing for two days and this
    > morning my one finger that has a bit of arthritis in it was sore. It had
    > not bothered me for months.... until I was exposed to the cure.


    I don't know if I've ever seen a stinging nettle,
    but there's a well-known phenomenon in medicine
    called counter-irritation. If you have a pain
    in one part of the body, irritating another part
    nearby can divert attention from the pain, providing
    some relief. That's why bee stings are sometimes
    recommended for joint pain, as well as devices
    that poke the skin with sharp points or deliver
    small electric shocks.

  7. #7
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    > problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    > had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    > until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    > handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    > felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.


    Reading this:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle

    I think I may have touched a stinging nettle when
    I was a teenager. I just barely touched it, and
    immediately got a sharp pain even though I couldn't
    see a thorn or wound in my finger.

  8. #8
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 5/1/2011 6:50 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    > problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    > had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    > until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    > handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    > felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.


    "But don't run away, as this plant is worth gathering. Nettles are a
    mineral supply depot. Nettles have human usable forms of iron, calcium,
    potassium, magnesium, and Vitamins A, C, and D. "

    http://www.stonecirclefarm.com/artic...ng-nettle.html

    Nettle Soup

    Combine in a medium saucepan:

    5 cups chicken broth
    3 cups young nettle tops (washed and chopped into 1" pieces)

    Boil 10 minutes. For a smooth soup, force the cooked nettles through a
    sieve or food mill or blend 1 minute in a blender. Return nettles and
    liquid to the saucepan and add:

    3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
    1 tablespoon butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    pinch of black pepper, freshly ground.

    Simmer briefly and serve.



  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2011-05-01, Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    >> problems with it.......

    >
    > Boy howdy! I peed on one when I was 8 yrs old. Swung away from me.
    > Guess where it swung back to.
    >
    > nb


    Egad! I ran through a filed of them once, but that????

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 01/05/2011 8:54 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > On 5/1/2011 6:50 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    >> problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    >> had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    >> until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    >> handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    >> felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.

    >
    > "But don't run away, as this plant is worth gathering. Nettles are a
    > mineral supply depot. Nettles have human usable forms of iron, calcium,
    > potassium, magnesium, and Vitamins A, C, and D. "
    >
    > http://www.stonecirclefarm.com/artic...ng-nettle.html
    >
    > Nettle Soup
    >
    > Combine in a medium saucepan:
    >
    > 5 cups chicken broth
    > 3 cups young nettle tops (washed and chopped into 1" pieces)
    >
    > Boil 10 minutes. For a smooth soup, force the cooked nettles through a
    > sieve or food mill or blend 1 minute in a blender. Return nettles and
    > liquid to the saucepan and add:
    >
    > 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
    > 1 tablespoon butter
    > ½ teaspoon salt
    > pinch of black pepper, freshly ground.
    >
    > Simmer briefly and serve.
    >



    Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.

    >



  11. #11
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > On 01/05/2011 8:54 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    >> On 5/1/2011 6:50 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >>> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    >>> problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    >>> had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    >>> until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    >>> handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    >>> felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.

    >>
    >> "But don't run away, as this plant is worth gathering. Nettles are a
    >> mineral supply depot. Nettles have human usable forms of iron, calcium,
    >> potassium, magnesium, and Vitamins A, C, and D. "
    >>
    >> http://www.stonecirclefarm.com/artic...ng-nettle.html
    >>
    >> Nettle Soup
    >>
    >> Combine in a medium saucepan:
    >>
    >> 5 cups chicken broth
    >> 3 cups young nettle tops (washed and chopped into 1" pieces)
    >>
    >> Boil 10 minutes. For a smooth soup, force the cooked nettles through a
    >> sieve or food mill or blend 1 minute in a blender. Return nettles and
    >> liquid to the saucepan and add:
    >>
    >> 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
    >> 1 tablespoon butter
    >> ½ teaspoon salt
    >> pinch of black pepper, freshly ground.
    >>
    >> Simmer briefly and serve.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    > try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    > apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    >

    I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    that is nil.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm "not"
    [email protected]

  12. #12
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 5/1/2011 12:50 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > My mom was telling me about how my grandmother used
    > to cook with gobo, and it sounded pretty good, so
    > I bought some today. I just ate some in soup.
    >
    > It's good. It doesn't have a strong flavor, but
    > it does have a nice texture. I did soak it for
    > 10 minutes as recommended here:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_burdock
    >
    > I peeled it, though mom said to scrape the outside.
    > It's sort of like a carrot, but you don't eat it raw
    > and it doesn't develop that awful flavor carrots do
    > when cooked. At only $1.69/lb at the Asian food store,
    > it's cheaper than carrots at Safeway.
    >
    > The Wikipedia article says it's like artichoke.
    > It's sufficiently close, I may try steaming it
    > and eating it with typical artichoke condiments.


    I was at a funeral this evening and it's customary to serve a little
    meal at the end. They served a gobo dish which was julienned gobo and
    carrots simmered in a shoyu and sugar sauce. I'm not a big fan of gobo
    because it has an unpleasant fibrous texture. No matter, it's a popular
    funeral food as is nishime - which I'm not too fond of either.

    The shoyu pork and funeral sushi and mochi was pretty good. It's pretty
    funny - they always serve a sweet drink made from fruit punch or orange
    syrup at these things. I sure wish they'd serve something better.

  13. #13
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    In article <ipl7te$j7n$[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > > On 01/05/2011 8:54 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > >> On 5/1/2011 6:50 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > >>> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    > >>> problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    > >>> had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    > >>> until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    > >>> handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    > >>> felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.
    > >>
    > >> "But don't run away, as this plant is worth gathering. Nettles are a
    > >> mineral supply depot. Nettles have human usable forms of iron, calcium,
    > >> potassium, magnesium, and Vitamins A, C, and D. "
    > >>
    > >> http://www.stonecirclefarm.com/artic...ng-nettle.html
    > >>
    > >> Nettle Soup
    > >>
    > >> Combine in a medium saucepan:
    > >>
    > >> 5 cups chicken broth
    > >> 3 cups young nettle tops (washed and chopped into 1" pieces)
    > >>
    > >> Boil 10 minutes. For a smooth soup, force the cooked nettles through a
    > >> sieve or food mill or blend 1 minute in a blender. Return nettles and
    > >> liquid to the saucepan and add:
    > >>
    > >> 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
    > >> 1 tablespoon butter
    > >> ? teaspoon salt
    > >> pinch of black pepper, freshly ground.
    > >>
    > >> Simmer briefly and serve.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    > > try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    > > apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    > >

    > I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    > beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    > that is nil.


    IIRC, Solzhenitsyn mentions nettle soup as being a staple of Gulag
    cuisine. I suspect that there's a message there somehwere . . .





  14. #14
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention


    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> Nettle Soup
    >> > Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    >> > try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    >> > apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    >> >

    >> I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    >> beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    >> that is nil.

    >
    > IIRC, Solzhenitsyn mentions nettle soup as being a staple of Gulag
    > cuisine. I suspect that there's a message there somehwere . . .


    Nettles are absolutely delicious, just wear garden gloves when gathering
    them. Wash in a cool bath instead of a shower, wearing rubber gloves. Toss
    in a big pot, cover and cook until wilted. All the sting is now gone. You
    can then make anything of them. I make ravioli. I also sautè them with
    chard and spinach or turnip greens with garlic, red pepper and oil and toss
    freshly cooked pasta in it. Add raw oil to taste.

    Nettle soup like sorrel soup, of the same season, is jammed with butter, so
    though I like it, I never make it. The reason we eat nettles is that the
    plant is simply the most efficient at stripping minerals from soil, so they
    are a nutritionists dream. If you doubt me, plant some under your roses and
    watch your rose turn yellow.



  15. #15
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    James Silverton wrote:
    > On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >> On 01/05/2011 8:54 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    >>> On 5/1/2011 6:50 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >>>> It's worth learning about stinging nettles so that you might avoid
    >>>> problems with it. It is more of an annoyance than a severe problem. I
    >>>> had heard about it as a kid but never really knew what it looked like
    >>>> until I moved to this property and was weeding the garden. I grabbed a
    >>>> handful of weeds, one of which turned out to be stinging nettles. It
    >>>> felt like I had stuck my hand into a hornets' nest.
    >>>
    >>> "But don't run away, as this plant is worth gathering. Nettles are a
    >>> mineral supply depot. Nettles have human usable forms of iron, calcium,
    >>> potassium, magnesium, and Vitamins A, C, and D. "
    >>>
    >>> http://www.stonecirclefarm.com/artic...ng-nettle.html
    >>>
    >>> Nettle Soup
    >>>
    >>> Combine in a medium saucepan:
    >>>
    >>> 5 cups chicken broth
    >>> 3 cups young nettle tops (washed and chopped into 1" pieces)
    >>>
    >>> Boil 10 minutes. For a smooth soup, force the cooked nettles through a
    >>> sieve or food mill or blend 1 minute in a blender. Return nettles and
    >>> liquid to the saucepan and add:
    >>>
    >>> 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
    >>> 1 tablespoon butter
    >>> ½ teaspoon salt
    >>> pinch of black pepper, freshly ground.
    >>>
    >>> Simmer briefly and serve.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    >> try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    >> apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    >>

    > I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    > beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    > that is nil.
    >

    Same here. I keep reading about nettles being edible, but once
    stung, it is hard to work up the least bit of desire to try them.

    --
    Jean B.

  16. #16
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    dsi1 wrote:
    > On 5/1/2011 12:50 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> My mom was telling me about how my grandmother used
    >> to cook with gobo, and it sounded pretty good, so
    >> I bought some today. I just ate some in soup.
    >>
    >> It's good. It doesn't have a strong flavor, but
    >> it does have a nice texture. I did soak it for
    >> 10 minutes as recommended here:
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_burdock
    >>
    >> I peeled it, though mom said to scrape the outside.
    >> It's sort of like a carrot, but you don't eat it raw
    >> and it doesn't develop that awful flavor carrots do
    >> when cooked. At only $1.69/lb at the Asian food store,
    >> it's cheaper than carrots at Safeway.
    >>
    >> The Wikipedia article says it's like artichoke.
    >> It's sufficiently close, I may try steaming it
    >> and eating it with typical artichoke condiments.

    >
    > I was at a funeral this evening and it's customary to serve a little
    > meal at the end. They served a gobo dish which was julienned gobo and
    > carrots simmered in a shoyu and sugar sauce. I'm not a big fan of gobo
    > because it has an unpleasant fibrous texture. No matter, it's a popular
    > funeral food as is nishime - which I'm not too fond of either.
    >
    > The shoyu pork and funeral sushi and mochi was pretty good. It's pretty
    > funny - they always serve a sweet drink made from fruit punch or orange
    > syrup at these things. I sure wish they'd serve something better.


    I also am not too fond of gobo, but at least it isn't shiso, which
    I detest.

    --
    Jean B.

  17. #17
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    Giusi wrote:
    > "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>> On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >>>>> Nettle Soup
    >>>> Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    >>>> try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    >>>> apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    >>>>
    >>> I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    >>> beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    >>> that is nil.

    >> IIRC, Solzhenitsyn mentions nettle soup as being a staple of Gulag
    >> cuisine. I suspect that there's a message there somehwere . . .

    >
    > Nettles are absolutely delicious, just wear garden gloves when gathering
    > them. Wash in a cool bath instead of a shower, wearing rubber gloves. Toss
    > in a big pot, cover and cook until wilted. All the sting is now gone. You
    > can then make anything of them. I make ravioli. I also sautè them with
    > chard and spinach or turnip greens with garlic, red pepper and oil and toss
    > freshly cooked pasta in it. Add raw oil to taste.
    >
    > Nettle soup like sorrel soup, of the same season, is jammed with butter, so
    > though I like it, I never make it. The reason we eat nettles is that the
    > plant is simply the most efficient at stripping minerals from soil, so they
    > are a nutritionists dream. If you doubt me, plant some under your roses and
    > watch your rose turn yellow.
    >
    >

    Hmmm. Do they also strip toxins from the soil???

    --
    Jean B.

  18. #18
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention


    "Jean B." <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Hmmm. Do they also strip toxins from the soil???


    I have no idea. OTH, any mineral could be toxic in huge quantities, but I
    suspect that nettles are not toxic because generations of Mediterraneans and
    British have been eating them and have not disappeared from Earth. You eat
    them only when there is fresh growth, which here is spring and autumn, and
    you nip off the tops which are the freshest growth. In summer when it is
    very dry here they are inedible because of a build-up of oxalic acid.



  19. #19
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > >> On 5/1/2011 9:16 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Nettle Soup
    > >> > Thanks, but after having been stung numerous times, I am not likely to
    > >> > try it in soup. However, there is always the chance of some sort of
    > >> > apocalyptic famine and it might be the only thing to eat.
    > >> >
    > >> I suppose I might try cooked nettles in desperation if I was absolutely
    > >> beat for greens but I'd rather eat cooked spinach and my enthusiasm for
    > >> that is nil.

    > >
    > > IIRC, Solzhenitsyn mentions nettle soup as being a staple of Gulag
    > > cuisine. I suspect that there's a message there somehwere . . .

    >
    > Nettles are absolutely delicious,


    They certainly are; and a great source of iron, vitamins and minerals.

    > just wear garden gloves when gathering
    > them. Wash in a cool bath instead of a shower, wearing rubber gloves. Toss
    > in a big pot, cover and cook until wilted. All the sting is now gone.


    My grandmother always cooked young nettles in spring as a "cleanser and
    tonic" and she picked them barehanded. The sting only develops in mature
    leaves; young ones have next to none. She picked barehanded because
    that's how to tell the tastiest tenderest bits... they don't sting when
    grasped firmly. I'm currently weeding young spring nettles barehanded.

    Janet

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Gobo, a vegetable deserving more attention

    On 5/2/2011 11:29 AM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Janet wrote:
    >>
    >> My grandmother always cooked young nettles in spring as a "cleanser and
    >> tonic" and she picked them barehanded. The sting only develops in mature
    >> leaves; young ones have next to none. She picked barehanded because
    >> that's how to tell the tastiest tenderest bits... they don't sting when
    >> grasped firmly. I'm currently weeding young spring nettles barehanded.

    >
    > That sounds like determining whether a gun is loaded
    > by pulling the trigger.


    It's a thing that children learn early and is well known in the phrase
    "Grasp the nettle". However, as children also learn, the nettle should
    also be grasped *quickly*.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm "not"
    [email protected]

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32