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Thread: Goat meatballs

  1. #1
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Goat meatballs

    I was planning to make my standard lamb meatballs, but there
    was also ground goat at the farmer's market so impulsively I
    bought that instead.

    I am wondering what sort of adjustment of seasoning makes
    sense? I am thinking along the lines of curry, garam masala,
    or jerk. I also have some Bufalo (not Buffalo) sauce and
    thought I'd throw a bit of that in.

    Any opinions?

    Steve

  2. #2
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Wed, 25 Mar 2009 23:02:32 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    >I was planning to make my standard lamb meatballs, but there
    >was also ground goat at the farmer's market so impulsively I
    >bought that instead.
    >
    >I am wondering what sort of adjustment of seasoning makes
    >sense? I am thinking along the lines of curry, garam masala,
    >or jerk. I also have some Bufalo (not Buffalo) sauce and
    >thought I'd throw a bit of that in.
    >

    Treat it just like lamb. Or mutton - in Indian recipes (from India)
    they often use the word mutton when referring to goat meat.

  3. #3
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs


    Steve Pope wrote:
    >
    > I was planning to make my standard lamb meatballs, but there
    > was also ground goat at the farmer's market so impulsively I
    > bought that instead.
    >
    > I am wondering what sort of adjustment of seasoning makes
    > sense? I am thinking along the lines of curry, garam masala,
    > or jerk. I also have some Bufalo (not Buffalo) sauce and
    > thought I'd throw a bit of that in.
    >
    > Any opinions?
    >
    > Steve


    The only goat I've had was Jamaican curry goat which was very good. I'm
    not sure if they do goat with jerk seasoning.

  4. #4
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Pete C. said...

    >
    > Steve Pope wrote:
    >>
    >> I was planning to make my standard lamb meatballs, but there
    >> was also ground goat at the farmer's market so impulsively I
    >> bought that instead.
    >>
    >> I am wondering what sort of adjustment of seasoning makes
    >> sense? I am thinking along the lines of curry, garam masala,
    >> or jerk. I also have some Bufalo (not Buffalo) sauce and
    >> thought I'd throw a bit of that in.
    >>
    >> Any opinions?
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > The only goat I've had was Jamaican curry goat which was very good. I'm
    > not sure if they do goat with jerk seasoning.



    I wouldn't buy ground goat if I didn't witness it butchered and ground up.

    I'd try it untouched by spices to try it's flavor the first time, then
    doctor it up next time.

    Andy

  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Wed, 25 Mar 2009 19:18:19 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I wouldn't buy ground goat if I didn't witness it butchered and ground up.


    As Steve more than likely bought it at the Berkeley farmers market, I
    don't think I would worry too much about it. They are pretty
    demanding in terms of the products sold....and pretty ethical.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Thanks for the replies so far.

    I know I could season it just like lamb meatballs (for which
    I use garlic, Spanish smoked pimenton, olive oil, lemon juice
    and sea salt), but part of my goal is to differentiate the
    goat meatballs, so as to serve them side-by-side with
    conventional lamb meatballs as a sort of contrast.

    I will probably give it a shot with garam masala as I have
    some on hand, and the ingredients in it (cinnimon, clove..)
    resemble some goat curries I've had.

    The suggestion of cooking and tasting some unseasoned is
    also a good one. I've bought goat shoulder from this vendor,
    but not ground goat before.

    Steve

  7. #7
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Mar 25, 6:02*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > I was planning to make my standard lamb meatballs, but there
    > was also ground goat at the farmer's market so impulsively I
    > bought that instead.
    >

    I don't personally enjoy goat, but it is a healthier meat than beef,
    pork, or even lamb. It has a better fatty acid profile. That's
    especially true of goat milk/cheese.
    >
    > Steve


    --Bryan

  8. #8
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Mar 25, 6:36*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Thanks for the replies so far.
    >
    > I know I could season it just like lamb meatballs (for which
    > I use garlic, Spanish smoked pimenton, olive oil, lemon juice
    > and sea salt), but part of my goal is to differentiate the
    > goat meatballs, so as to serve them side-by-side with
    > conventional lamb meatballs as a sort of contrast.
    >
    > I will probably give it a shot with garam masala as I have
    > some on hand, and the ingredients in it (cinnimon, clove..)
    > resemble some goat curries I've had.
    >
    > The suggestion of cooking and tasting some unseasoned is
    > also a good one. *I've bought goat shoulder from this vendor,
    > but not ground goat before.
    >
    > Steve


    What if you treat the lamb Greek and the goat Indian? Serve them with
    rice or couscous or both. Add a salad of cukes and carrots and
    radishes with a chili vinaigrette and something really soft and
    soothing for dessert - kheer or flan or . . .
    Lynn in Fargo
    singing: How high's the water, Mama?
    I said 36.5 and risin'!

  9. #9
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What if you treat the lamb Greek and the goat Indian? Serve them with
    >rice or couscous or both. Add a salad of cukes and carrots and
    >radishes with a chili vinaigrette and something really soft and
    >soothing for dessert - kheer or flan or . . .


    Great ideas.

    I did do the trial run of goat meatballs seasoned with garam
    masala. Pretty good, but not sure if they're presentation
    quality. I may play it safe and stick with only lamb meatballs
    for my guests.

    Steve

  10. #10
    phil..c Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Thanks for the replies so far.
    >
    > I know I could season it just like lamb meatballs (for which
    > I use garlic, Spanish smoked pimenton, olive oil, lemon juice
    > and sea salt), but part of my goal is to differentiate the
    > goat meatballs, so as to serve them side-by-side with
    > conventional lamb meatballs as a sort of contrast.
    >
    > I will probably give it a shot with garam masala as I have
    > some on hand, and the ingredients in it (cinnimon, clove..)
    > resemble some goat curries I've had.
    >
    > The suggestion of cooking and tasting some unseasoned is
    > also a good one. I've bought goat shoulder from this vendor,
    > but not ground goat before.
    >
    > Steve

    as another poster mentioned just treat as you would Mutton
    Mutton in this sense as not the same as lamb .
    Goat is actually VERY flavoursome
    and now prefer it over lamb
    unless the lamb has been on salt bush ---------- now that is a great taste

  11. #11
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 13:07:33 +0900, "phil..c" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >> Steve

    >as another poster mentioned just treat as you would Mutton


    Not my exact intention. I only meant to say that many recipes from
    India, when translated into American, will use the word mutton when in
    actuality they would use goat when cooking it.

    Goat is much more tender and has a different flavor from 'real' mutton,
    which is a wether (castrated male sheep), or a breeding female, at least
    2 years old. Mutton is not easy to find in the US.

    > Mutton in this sense as not the same as lamb .
    >Goat is actually VERY flavoursome
    > and now prefer it over lamb
    >unless the lamb has been on salt bush ---------- now that is a great taste






  12. #12
    phil..c Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Robert Klute wrote:
    > On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 13:07:33 +0900, "phil..c" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> Steve

    >> as another poster mentioned just treat as you would Mutton

    >
    > Not my exact intention. I only meant to say that many recipes from
    > India, when translated into American, will use the word mutton when in
    > actuality they would use goat when cooking it.
    >
    > Goat is much more tender and has a different flavor from 'real' mutton,
    > which is a wether (castrated male sheep), or a breeding female, at least
    > 2 years old. Mutton is not easy to find in the US.


    Weird when you think about it often Mutton (IMO) has a better flavour
    than some lamb

    We are embarrassed by the numbers of Mutton sheep here and the blasted
    goats tens of thousands of the buggers that have gone Feral


    Nine years ago it was estimated that there were 2.6 million feral goats
    roaming about.

    That's more than the population of Perth and Adelaide combined!


    >> Mutton in this sense as not the same as lamb .
    >> Goat is actually VERY flavoursome
    >> and now prefer it over lamb
    >> unless the lamb has been on salt bush ---------- now that is a great taste

    >
    >
    >
    >


  13. #13
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    In article <gqein1$gjq$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Thanks for the replies so far.
    >
    > I know I could season it just like lamb meatballs (for which
    > I use garlic, Spanish smoked pimenton, olive oil, lemon juice
    > and sea salt), but part of my goal is to differentiate the
    > goat meatballs, so as to serve them side-by-side with
    > conventional lamb meatballs as a sort of contrast.


    Roll the cooked lamb meatballs in freshly chopped mint, and leave the
    goat meatballs as is. This may not be a good idea.

    leo

  14. #14
    phil..c Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    Leonard Blaisdell wrote:
    > In article <gqein1$gjq$[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for the replies so far.
    >>
    >> I know I could season it just like lamb meatballs (for which
    >> I use garlic, Spanish smoked pimenton, olive oil, lemon juice
    >> and sea salt), but part of my goal is to differentiate the
    >> goat meatballs, so as to serve them side-by-side with
    >> conventional lamb meatballs as a sort of contrast.

    >
    > Roll the cooked lamb meatballs in freshly chopped mint, and leave the
    > goat meatballs as is. This may not be a good idea.
    >
    > leo


    Hmmmmmmmm this just gave me an idea

    do goat meat balls then serve with mint and yoghurt with some paprika
    mixed in

    will try tomorrow have some goat in the freezers

    now to set up the old mincer same model as these
    only a LOT cleaner

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._gnangarra.jpg

    we had boxes of these things and donated them yonks ago and kept the
    better ones for own use .

  15. #15
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: Goat meatballs

    On Fri, 27 Mar 2009 08:02:50 +0900, "phil..c" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Robert Klute wrote:
    >> On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 13:07:33 +0900, "phil..c" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>> Steve
    >>> as another poster mentioned just treat as you would Mutton

    >>
    >> Not my exact intention. I only meant to say that many recipes from
    >> India, when translated into American, will use the word mutton when in
    >> actuality they would use goat when cooking it.
    >>
    >> Goat is much more tender and has a different flavor from 'real' mutton,
    >> which is a wether (castrated male sheep), or a breeding female, at least
    >> 2 years old. Mutton is not easy to find in the US.

    >
    >Weird when you think about it often Mutton (IMO) has a better flavour
    >than some lamb


    I agree, but Americans (USA only, apologizes to Mexico and Canada) tend
    to be adverse to meats they perceive to be gamy or strongly flavored.


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