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Thread: Gleaning apples

  1. #1
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Gleaning apples



    Just walked down the street to pick more apples from a tree in the yard
    of an empty house about to go into foreclosure. Sad. After ~20 years
    with two really nice families who raised their children and moved on,
    the past two or three inhabitants have been really shady and have lasted
    in the house less than a year apiece.

    I made applesauce last week,end with a basket of the apples. We think
    they may be golden delicious but they are unpruned, unsprayed, and many
    are wormy but the flavor is worth the prep required. There is also a
    thick layer of rotting drops on the ground that would probably make
    great compost

    Last night we had dinner at Daughter's house and I took an apple crisp,
    lots of sliced apples in the bottom of a glass baking dish, topped with
    a mixture of oats, brown sugar, butter, a little flour and salt, baked
    until the apples were tender and served warm with vanilla ice cream.
    Heavenly and healthy, too--think of all that oatmeal! (Hah!)

    gloria p

  2. #2
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Gleaning apples

    Gloria P wrote:
    >
    >
    > Just walked down the street to pick more apples from a tree in the yard
    > of an empty house about to go into foreclosure. Sad. After ~20 years
    > with two really nice families who raised their children and moved on,
    > the past two or three inhabitants have been really shady and have lasted
    > in the house less than a year apiece.
    >
    > I made applesauce last week,end with a basket of the apples. We think
    > they may be golden delicious but they are unpruned, unsprayed, and many
    > are wormy but the flavor is worth the prep required. There is also a
    > thick layer of rotting drops on the ground that would probably make
    > great compost
    >
    > Last night we had dinner at Daughter's house and I took an apple crisp,
    > lots of sliced apples in the bottom of a glass baking dish, topped with
    > a mixture of oats, brown sugar, butter, a little flour and salt, baked
    > until the apples were tender and served warm with vanilla ice cream.
    > Heavenly and healthy, too--think of all that oatmeal! (Hah!)
    >
    > gloria p




    I picked a bucket of crabapples from the only Dolgo tree I know of in
    town last month. I made a bunch of jelly (some of my best ever) and I
    have a quart of leftover juice and about 5 or 6 pounds of leftover
    crabapples in the freezer that I'm going to use to flavor some mead. I
    might get that started this weekend; it's getting close to the top of my
    todo list.

    There are crabapple trees planted all over town. Hundreds of them;
    maybe even a thousand. And almost all of them are varieties with hard
    little apples not much bigger than a pea. The stay on the trees all
    winter and never fall and even the birds won't eat them. (no they are
    not Bradford pear) I still haven't figured out why people plant apple
    trees and then go out of their way to get varieties that aren't even
    good for feeding the wildlife.

    Bob

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Gleaning apples

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > There are crabapple trees planted all over town. Hundreds of them;
    > maybe even a thousand. And almost all of them are varieties with hard
    > little apples not much bigger than a pea. The stay on the trees all
    > winter and never fall and even the birds won't eat them. (no they are
    > not Bradford pear) I still haven't figured out why people plant apple
    > trees and then go out of their way to get varieties that aren't even
    > good for feeding the wildlife.


    Same reason the cherry trees on the Capitol mall don't
    bear fruit. They were selected to be ornamental, in which
    case you don't want a bunch of rotten fruit on the ground.
    Or bird messes.

  4. #4
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: Gleaning apples

    On Oct 3, 4:45*pm, Gloria P <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Just walked down the street to pick more apples from a tree in the yard
    > of an empty house about to go into foreclosure. *Sad. *After ~20 years
    > with two really nice families who raised their children and moved on,
    > the past two or three inhabitants have been really shady and have lasted
    > in the house less than a year apiece.
    >
    > I made applesauce last week,end with a basket of the apples. *We think
    > they may be golden delicious but they are unpruned, unsprayed, and many
    > are wormy but the flavor is worth the prep required. *There is also a
    > thick layer of rotting drops on the ground that would probably make
    > great compost
    >
    > Last night we had dinner at Daughter's house and I took an apple crisp,
    > lots of sliced apples in the bottom of a glass baking dish, topped with
    > a mixture of oats, brown sugar, butter, a little flour and salt, baked
    > until the apples were tender and served warm with vanilla ice cream.
    > Heavenly and healthy, too--think of all that oatmeal! *(Hah!)
    >
    > gloria p


    Just passed one of my favourite 'gleaning' apple trees this afternoon:
    Not an apple left on the tree. Autumn has arrived.

    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada

  5. #5
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Knobby Apple Cake (was: Gleaning apples)

    Gloria P wrote:
    >
    >
    > Just walked down the street to pick more apples from a tree in the yard
    > of an empty house about to go into foreclosure. Sad. After ~20 years
    > with two really nice families who raised their children and moved on,
    > the past two or three inhabitants have been really shady and have lasted
    > in the house less than a year apiece.
    >
    > I made applesauce last week,end with a basket of the apples. We think
    > they may be golden delicious but they are unpruned, unsprayed, and many
    > are wormy but the flavor is worth the prep required. There is also a
    > thick layer of rotting drops on the ground that would probably make
    > great compost
    >
    > Last night we had dinner at Daughter's house and I took an apple crisp,
    > lots of sliced apples in the bottom of a glass baking dish, topped with
    > a mixture of oats, brown sugar, butter, a little flour and salt, baked
    > until the apples were tender and served warm with vanilla ice cream.
    > Heavenly and healthy, too--think of all that oatmeal! (Hah!)
    >
    > gloria p



    I've been eating sour apples all week for lunch. I bought a half
    bushel of Harelson seconds and culls last weekend for $8 at the local
    orchard. Tonight I brought the still-almost-full bag in the house and
    decided to cook something with them. I found this recipe posted here
    last year by "Martha", all I did was reformat it. It uses twice as many
    apples as my usual apple cake recipes. I made a 8x8" for supper
    tonight. Yes, we had cake for supper :P The batter tasted too salty
    when raw, but the cake is just right.


    Knobby Apple Cake
    (recipe from Farm Journal)

    1 cup sugar
    3 Tbsp butter, soft [I used 4 Tbsp]
    1 egg
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 c flour
    1/2 tsp cinnamon
    1/2 tsp nutmeg [I substituted ginger]
    3 cups chopped apples [I used Haralson]
    1/4 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

    Cream together the sugar and butter; add egg, and beat well. Sift
    together the dry ingredients, add to the wet and blend until well mixed.
    The batter will look like stiff cookie dough. Stir in the apples and
    nuts, and spread batter in well-greased 8x8" pan and bake at 350° until
    done, about 40 minutes. Serve warm.


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