Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

  1. #1
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default ginger - dry to fresh conversion???


    Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    (grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.

    Teriyaki marinade
    1/3 cup soy sauce
    1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    1 clove garlic crushed
    Janet US

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    > (grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    > molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    > did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    > forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >
    > Teriyaki marinade
    > 1/3 cup soy sauce
    > 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    > 2 tablespoons sugar
    > 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    > 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    > 1 clove garlic crushed
    > Janet US


    Fresh ginger is much more appropriate in a recipe like that one and
    you won't kill yourself if you taste for flavor. I'd use up to a
    tablespoon of fresh, but you could start with an equal amount of fresh
    and increase it depending on how much you want to taste the ginger.
    I'd also substitute 1T molasses for that brown sugar.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On 3/8/2012 1:11 PM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    > Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    > (grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    > molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    > did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    > forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >
    > Teriyaki marinade
    > 1/3 cup soy sauce
    > 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    > 2 tablespoons sugar
    > 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    > 1& 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    > 1 clove garlic crushed
    > Janet US


    Both fresh and powdered ginger have their uses but neither really can
    replace the other but I'll bet fresh ginger would work well in your
    marinade. I'd guess a couple of tablespoons.

    --
    Jim Silverton

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  4. #4
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Mar 8, 10:11*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    > (grated on micro plane) for powdered? *Also, have any of you used some
    > molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? *How
    > did that work out? *I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    > forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >
    > Teriyaki marinade
    > 1/3 cup soy sauce
    > 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    > 2 tablespoons sugar
    > 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    > 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    > 1 clove garlic crushed



    For that volume of liquid I would start by peeling and grating an inch
    of root first, and then tasting the marinade to see if it needs more,
    because the amount of "punch" imparted by any piece of ginger will
    vary. (I like more ginger than my wife does, so you may want to poll
    your family.) Same with the molasses -- in my experience molasses has
    to be added very judiciously because the flavor tends to overpower
    everything else.

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:05:44 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    >> (grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    >> molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    >> did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    >> forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >>
    >> Teriyaki marinade
    >> 1/3 cup soy sauce
    >> 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    >> 2 tablespoons sugar
    >> 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    >> 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    >> 1 clove garlic crushed
    >> Janet US

    >
    >Fresh ginger is much more appropriate in a recipe like that one and
    >you won't kill yourself if you taste for flavor. I'd use up to a
    >tablespoon of fresh, but you could start with an equal amount of fresh
    >and increase it depending on how much you want to taste the ginger.
    >I'd also substitute 1T molasses for that brown sugar.


    Thank you. You reinforced my inclination -- and, actually it tastes
    really good that way. I got this recipe from my MIL as a new bride
    back long, long ago. I love the flavor it gives to a nice hunk of
    beef but I think the fresh ginger will add more sparkle.
    Janet US

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    >(grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    >molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    >did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    >forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >
    >Teriyaki marinade
    >1/3 cup soy sauce
    >1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    >2 tablespoons sugar
    >1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    >1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    >1 clove garlic crushed
    >Janet US


    Ginger is one of those flavoring ingredients one uses "to taste",
    especially for something like a marinade. I don't think I've ever
    measured any ingredients for a marinade, so long as there's enough to
    cover whatever is being marinated. However you can substitute 3 Tbls
    of light brown sugar for 2 Tbls sugar and 1 Tbls dark brown sugar. You
    can also use honey instead, I would typically use orange marmalade.
    Unless you're going to start a business of selling marinades and need
    consistancy it's really inane to actually measure ingredients for any
    marinade for a home cook... use what you got an dhow much *feels*
    right. It's difficult to accurately substitute powdered ginger for
    fresh because once prepared powdered gets stronger over time just like
    mustard powder... I'd probably eyeball half the amount of powdered as
    fresh. Btw, ginger mustard is very good with fish and poultry. I
    usually add some powdered ginger when I prepare hot oriental mustard.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 12:12:54 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:05:44 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    > >> (grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    > >> molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    > >> did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    > >> forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    > >>
    > >> Teriyaki marinade
    > >> 1/3 cup soy sauce
    > >> 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    > >> 2 tablespoons sugar
    > >> 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    > >> 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    > >> 1 clove garlic crushed
    > >> Janet US

    > >
    > >Fresh ginger is much more appropriate in a recipe like that one and
    > >you won't kill yourself if you taste for flavor. I'd use up to a
    > >tablespoon of fresh, but you could start with an equal amount of fresh
    > >and increase it depending on how much you want to taste the ginger.
    > >I'd also substitute 1T molasses for that brown sugar.

    >
    > Thank you. You reinforced my inclination -- and, actually it tastes
    > really good that way. I got this recipe from my MIL as a new bride
    > back long, long ago. I love the flavor it gives to a nice hunk of
    > beef but I think the fresh ginger will add more sparkle.
    > Janet US


    YW! Try marinating chicken parts or pork ribs in it too.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  8. #8
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    Janet Bostwick wrote:

    >Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    >(grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    >molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    >did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    >forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >
    >Teriyaki marinade
    >1/3 cup soy sauce
    >1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    >2 tablespoons sugar
    >1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    >1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    >1 clove garlic crushed


    To use fresh ginger, I'd use double the amount of dried.

    And as for sugar, I thought the definition of brown sugar is white
    sugar + molasses. The only real use I have for brown sugar is
    streusel, where you don't mix it enough to blend the molasses
    properly. To simplify, the rule of thumb I've used is 1 cup brown
    sugar = 1 cup white sugar + 1 tsp molasses.



  9. #9
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Mar 8, 11:12*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:05:44 -0800, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > >On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    > ><nos...@cableone.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    > >> (grated on micro plane) for powdered? *Also, have any of you used some
    > >> molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? *How
    > >> did that work out? *I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    > >> forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.

    >
    > >> Teriyaki marinade
    > >> 1/3 cup soy sauce
    > >> 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    > >> 2 tablespoons sugar
    > >> 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    > >> 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    > >> 1 clove garlic crushed
    > >> Janet US

    >
    > >Fresh ginger is much more appropriate in a recipe like that one and
    > >you won't kill yourself if you taste for flavor. *I'd use up to a
    > >tablespoon of fresh, but you could start with an equal amount of fresh
    > >and increase it depending on how much you want to taste the ginger.
    > >I'd also substitute 1T molasses for that brown sugar.

    >
    > Thank you. *You reinforced my inclination -- and, actually it tastes
    > really good that way. *I got this recipe from my MIL as a new bride
    > back long, long ago. *I love the flavor it gives to a nice hunk of
    > beef but I think the fresh ginger will add more sparkle.


    Realize though, that a tablespoon of brown sugar contains nothing like
    the tablespoon of molasses that sf would have you substitute for it. I
    would add molasses drop by drop.


  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 8 Mar 2012 11:28:59 -0800 (PST), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mar 8, 11:12*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:05:44 -0800, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >> >On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:11:20 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    >> ><nos...@cableone.net> wrote:

    >>
    >> >> Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    >> >> (grated on micro plane) for powdered? *Also, have any of you used some
    >> >> molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? *How
    >> >> did that work out? *I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    >> >> forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.

    >>
    >> >> Teriyaki marinade
    >> >> 1/3 cup soy sauce
    >> >> 1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    >> >> 2 tablespoons sugar
    >> >> 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    >> >> 1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    >> >> 1 clove garlic crushed
    >> >> Janet US

    >>
    >> >Fresh ginger is much more appropriate in a recipe like that one and
    >> >you won't kill yourself if you taste for flavor. *I'd use up to a
    >> >tablespoon of fresh, but you could start with an equal amount of fresh
    >> >and increase it depending on how much you want to taste the ginger.
    >> >I'd also substitute 1T molasses for that brown sugar.

    >>
    >> Thank you. *You reinforced my inclination -- and, actually it tastes
    >> really good that way. *I got this recipe from my MIL as a new bride
    >> back long, long ago. *I love the flavor it gives to a nice hunk of
    >> beef but I think the fresh ginger will add more sparkle.

    >
    >Realize though, that a tablespoon of brown sugar contains nothing like
    >the tablespoon of molasses that sf would have you substitute for it. I
    >would add molasses drop by drop.


    I understand. She also recommended tasting as you go. I had done
    that. Doing so kept the molasses from predominating
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 11:19:31 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >> Janet US

    >
    >YW! Try marinating chicken parts or pork ribs in it too.


    I never thought of using it on pork. good idea. I'll try it.
    Janet US

  12. #12
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 14:15:40 -0500, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    snip. Btw, ginger mustard is very good with fish and poultry.
    I

    >usually add some powdered ginger when I prepare hot oriental mustard.


    What a good idea! I have never heard of ginger mustard. Thanks
    Janet US

  13. #13
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 14:22:58 -0500, George M. Middius
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    >>Does anyone know what the proper substitution amount of fresh ginger
    >>(grated on micro plane) for powdered? Also, have any of you used some
    >>molasses and white sugar when a recipe called for brown sugar? How
    >>did that work out? I'm making a marinade that I have made just about
    >>forever -- see below and was wondering about doing some substitutions.
    >>
    >>Teriyaki marinade
    >>1/3 cup soy sauce
    >>1 tablespoon wine vinegar
    >>2 tablespoons sugar
    >>1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
    >>1 & 1/2 tsp powdered ginger
    >>1 clove garlic crushed

    >
    >To use fresh ginger, I'd use double the amount of dried.
    >
    >And as for sugar, I thought the definition of brown sugar is white
    >sugar + molasses. The only real use I have for brown sugar is
    >streusel, where you don't mix it enough to blend the molasses
    >properly. To simplify, the rule of thumb I've used is 1 cup brown
    >sugar = 1 cup white sugar + 1 tsp molasses.
    >


    You are correct that brown sugar is white plus molasses. This is a
    very old recipe -- before home cooks knew that. I've just been making
    it the same old way for ever without thinking much about it. Today I
    had time to think and change the recipe. Old dogs and new tricks you
    know. ;o)
    Janet US

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 8 Mar 2012 11:28:59 -0800 (PST), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Realize though, that a tablespoon of brown sugar contains nothing like
    > the tablespoon of molasses that sf would have you substitute for it. I
    > would add molasses drop by drop.


    I don't have the same aversion that you have to molasses... but I use
    unsulphured, so maybe that's why.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On 8 Mar 2012 20:19:41 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2012-03-08, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > > fresh because once prepared powdered gets stronger over time just like
    > > mustard powder...

    >
    > I disagree.
    >
    > I've never tasted a ginger pwdr that's even remotely close to fresh
    > ginger in tang/piquancy. It's been my experience it starts degrading
    > immediately and becomes useless dreck after a few months. Strangely,
    > I have some homemade (not by me) candied ginger that is amazingly
    > strong, but it doesn't seem to leach any of its tangy good gingeryness
    > out into the dish. Not sure what's happening --or not happening--
    > there. Still experimenting.
    >

    Remember, he thinks mustard powder gets stronger over time too.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  16. #16
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    > You are correct that brown sugar is white plus molasses. This is a
    > very old recipe -- before home cooks knew that.


    Go back even farther and brown was usually as pure as common sugar got.
    To this day I can go to a Hispanic market and find cones of cane sugar
    that are brown. They came that way from the farm not made by
    recombining purified sugar plus molasses.

  17. #17
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Thu, 8 Mar 2012 20:59:36 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>
    >> You are correct that brown sugar is white plus molasses. This is a
    >> very old recipe -- before home cooks knew that.

    >
    >Go back even farther and brown was usually as pure as common sugar got.
    >To this day I can go to a Hispanic market and find cones of cane sugar
    >that are brown. They came that way from the farm not made by
    >recombining purified sugar plus molasses.


    I can get the cones here in the bulk bins, but I've never tried them.
    Do you use them for something specific?
    Janet US

  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On 8 Mar 2012 20:19:41 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2012-03-08, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> fresh because once prepared powdered gets stronger over time just like
    >> mustard powder...

    >
    >I disagree.
    >
    >I've never tasted a ginger pwdr that's even remotely close to fresh
    >ginger in tang/piquancy. It's been my experience it starts degrading
    >immediately and becomes useless dreck after a few months. Strangely,
    >I have some homemade (not by me) candied ginger that is amazingly
    >strong, but it doesn't seem to leach any of its tangy good gingeryness
    >out into the dish. Not sure what's happening --or not happening--
    >there. Still experimenting.
    >
    >nb


    You're obviously buying stale crap. Try Penzeys powdered ginger and
    store it properly. Dried ginger is very hard and difficult to
    grind... many companys that sell spices buy theirs already ground and
    they buy several years supply to get a low price, so what you are
    buying is too old. Ground spices have a rather short shelf life. I
    buy powdered ginger in an amount I can use up in about a year (4
    ounces) and I keep it in the freezer. Penzeys powdered ginger always
    arrives smelling very potent, it's obviously fresh ground.



  19. #19
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Janet Bostwick wrote:

    >
    >>> You are correct that brown sugar is white plus molasses. This is a
    >>> very old recipe -- before home cooks knew that.

    >
    >>Go back even farther and brown was usually as pure as common sugar got.
    >>To this day I can go to a Hispanic market and find cones of cane sugar
    >>that are brown. They came that way from the farm not made by
    >>recombining purified sugar plus molasses.

    >
    > I can get the cones here in the bulk bins, but I've never tried them.
    > Do you use them for something specific?


    Anything that brown sugar would go in. The brown sugar cones of
    incompletely refined cane sugar from Hispanic markets are the
    original form of brown sugar. Mixing completely refined white sugar
    with molasses is a "modern" immitation of that original form. Where
    modern in this context is now 2-3 generations.

    I like that the brown cones are smaller than a box of C&H brown sugar.

    I like that the brown cones are already solid so I don't have to worry
    about hardened - I know in advance I'll have to whack it with a hammer
    to get it into powdered form. "Like" is a bit of an exaggeration. It
    eliminates a known source of frustration.

    I like that they are products of small farms and small companies. Think
    global, act local.

    Most of all with the brown ones there's enough of the original cane left
    that it has a slight but definate flavor from the cane. I can tell with
    a taste that it's not HFCS (or beet sugar). Try it side by side with
    the molasses form and the difference is obvious. Try it separated by
    days, probably not.

  20. #20
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: ginger - dry to fresh conversion???

    On Fri, 9 Mar 2012 16:05:25 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>Janet Bostwick wrote:

    >>
    >>>> You are correct that brown sugar is white plus molasses. This is a
    >>>> very old recipe -- before home cooks knew that.

    >>
    >>>Go back even farther and brown was usually as pure as common sugar got.
    >>>To this day I can go to a Hispanic market and find cones of cane sugar
    >>>that are brown. They came that way from the farm not made by
    >>>recombining purified sugar plus molasses.

    >>
    >> I can get the cones here in the bulk bins, but I've never tried them.
    >> Do you use them for something specific?

    >
    >Anything that brown sugar would go in. The brown sugar cones of
    >incompletely refined cane sugar from Hispanic markets are the
    >original form of brown sugar. Mixing completely refined white sugar
    >with molasses is a "modern" immitation of that original form. Where
    >modern in this context is now 2-3 generations.
    >
    >I like that the brown cones are smaller than a box of C&H brown sugar.
    >
    >I like that the brown cones are already solid so I don't have to worry
    >about hardened - I know in advance I'll have to whack it with a hammer
    >to get it into powdered form. "Like" is a bit of an exaggeration. It
    >eliminates a known source of frustration.
    >
    >I like that they are products of small farms and small companies. Think
    >global, act local.
    >
    >Most of all with the brown ones there's enough of the original cane left
    >that it has a slight but definate flavor from the cane. I can tell with
    >a taste that it's not HFCS (or beet sugar). Try it side by side with
    >the molasses form and the difference is obvious. Try it separated by
    >days, probably not.


    O.k., I'll give it a try. thanks
    Janet US

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32