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Thread: The gift (or Free) economy

  1. #1
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default The gift (or Free) economy

    This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    with them some day!" It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    thought I'd share.

    http://www.blogher.com/economy-and-community-free

    Serene
    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  2. #2
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy

    On Mar 23, 11:49*am, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    > that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    > saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    > with them some day!" *It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    > thought I'd share.
    >
    > http://www.blogher.com/economy-and-community-free



    Yeah, yeah. Some guy might need that info today, and the other might
    never get to write that book.

    It's nice to know that it's not always all about money. What's that
    about lights under bushels?

  3. #3
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy

    On 2010-03-23, Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    > that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    > saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    > with them some day!" It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    > thought I'd share.


    I don't see anything wrong with charging for one's knowledge. Much of
    mine I give away. But, if I was to need income and charge for, say, a
    cookbook of my recipes, there's nothing wrong with that. I'd probably
    starve to death, but the concept is a good one.

    nb



  4. #4
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy


    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2010-03-23, Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    > > that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    > > saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    > > with them some day!" It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    > > thought I'd share.

    >
    > I don't see anything wrong with charging for one's knowledge. Much of
    > mine I give away. But, if I was to need income and charge for, say, a
    > cookbook of my recipes, there's nothing wrong with that. I'd probably
    > starve to death, but the concept is a good one.
    >
    > nb


    Knowledge is power, and sharing one's knowledge indescriminantly can
    have very negative unintended consequences. Granted this is less likely
    with food recipes than with military technology, but the overall point
    remains.

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 08:49:05 -0700, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    > that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    > saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    > with them some day!" It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    > thought I'd share.
    >
    > http://www.blogher.com/economy-and-community-free
    >


    What happens if someone decides to patent or copyright something you
    gave away for free and tells you to cease and desist?


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  6. #6
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy

    On 3/23/2010 1:51 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 08:49:05 -0700, Serene Vannoy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> This article is a good example of the thinking that is behind the fact
    >> that I share all my recipes with anyone who wants them, rather than
    >> saying "Oh, but I'm writing a cookbook and I might want to make money
    >> with them some day!" It made me think of the related threads here, so I
    >> thought I'd share.
    >>
    >> http://www.blogher.com/economy-and-community-free
    >>

    >
    > What happens if someone decides to patent or copyright something you
    > gave away for free and tells you to cease and desist?


    If you can prove you wrote it first then that backfires on them because
    you hold the copyright. Just the act of writing something down
    copyrights it in the US and much of the rest of the world. Registration
    of copyright secures additional rights for the author but it's not
    necessary.

    As for patents, if you can demonstrate prior art then the patent becomes
    invalid.

    Of course defending such things can be expensive.


  7. #7
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: The gift (or Free) economy

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > sf wrote:
    >
    >> What happens if someone decides to patent or copyright something you
    >> gave away for free and tells you to cease and desist?

    >
    > If you can prove you wrote it first then that backfires on them because
    > you hold the copyright. Just the act of writing something down
    > copyrights it in the US and much of the rest of the world. Registration
    > of copyright secures additional rights for the author but it's not
    > necessary.
    >
    > As for patents, if you can demonstrate prior art then the patent becomes
    > invalid.
    >
    > Of course defending such things can be expensive.


    In the case of a UseNet post it's very cheap to look it up in the Google
    archive, print it out, hilight the date and send it in a registered
    letter to the lawyer who sent you a notice. Attach a note saying that
    demonstrates prior art or that you are the copyright holding original
    author. Offer to not ask to have them disbarred for filing a frivolous
    lawsuit if they terminate their case with prejudice. Point out that if
    they do take you to court your evidence is that easy and you'll ask the
    court that they pay your court costs then ask about punative damages to
    keep them from bothering others with similar cases.

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